Recent Reviews

If you’d like to add your own review, simply click ‘Leave a Review’ on the wine’s product page.


SP16331 SP16331 The Society's Exhibition Rioja Reserva 2015

The wine is a garnet colour, indicating it has some ageing behind it. And this wine has done that very elegantly indeed. It has aromas of cedar, vanilla, coconut and red fruits. There's a refreshing acidity with red fruits, vanilla and spice all tapping on my palate's senses. - Jane Clare

( Lancashire Evening Post 5th Apr 2021 )

£16.50
CE10971 CE10971 Undurraga Candelabro Itata Cinsault 2019

The grapes for this wine come from 70-year old, “dry-farmed” (unirrigated) cinsault vines in Itata, one of Chile’s more southerly wine regions. This is a light-ish-bodied – yet also fleshy – red that would work well with lamb chops or pâté. - Victoria Moore

( The Daily Telegraph 3rd Apr 2021 )

£7.50
SP15721 SP15721 Asua Crianza Rioja, 2017

This Rioja is a scintillating mix of coffee, vanilla and chocolate aromas with a delicious spicy smokiness from 18 months of ageing in French oak barrels.  Top notch with lamb. - Matt Nixson

( Daily Express 3rd Apr 2021 )

£10.50
WC21120 WC21120 Fizz & Chocolates Case

The Saumur region of the Loire is noted for its sparkling wine and this fizz, from producer Gratien & Meyer's 2015 vintage, brings body to the wine without losing freshness. Easy on the palate and the Linden Lady chocolates in a 300g box are equally tasty. - Matt Nixson

( Daily Express 3rd Apr 2021 )

£26.50
AA3081 AA3081 Familie Mantler Roter Veltliner, Niederösterreich 2019

This obscure white grape variety is a rarity, accounting for just 0.4% of Austrian plantings. Despite the name, it's not believed to related to gruner veltliner. The fruit character here feels softer than in gruner, red apple and pear flavours, fresh and clean. Aged in stainless steel for a year and bottled under screwcap, this is an uncomplicated wine with modest alcohol. Will be moving on to the 2020 vintage soon. 88/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£8.95
AU23151 AU23151 Pauletts Polish Hill River Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot 2017

Neil and Alison Paulett bought this Clare Valley winery in 1983 and have since extended the vineyards and welcomed their son Matthew into the business. Both father and son graduated from Adelaide's famous wine school, Roseworthy, and Neil spent time at Penfolds and Rosemount before branching out on his own. This well-priced red shows off their expertise, fruit-forward and silky smooth. It's a blend of 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, and has some age to add extra complexity. Very open on the nose, with brooding, dark, hedgerow fruits and a hint of boot polish. Subtle oaking doesn't obscure the New World generosity of fruit. Great value. 92/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£11.50
BJ8761 BJ8761 Beaujolais Les Pierres Dorées, Cuvée Louis Dépagneux 2020

The 2020 vintage of this wine is on sale from 13 April, and I'd advise you to make a beeline for it. It's a great year for Beaujolais and here has produced a fantastic value, semi-carbonic maceration style wine that offers masses of uncomplicated pleasure. Vibrant and unoaked, there's fleshy black cherry fruit, freshness and acidity. It's just what you'd want from a simple Beaujolais, and a great everyday summer red to serve slightly chilled 92/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£8.50
BU69901 BU69901 Domaine Sylvain Pataille, Marsannay Les Longeroies 2017

Sylvain Pataille trained as an oenologist in Bordeaux, and now consults to around 15 domaines in Burgundy. He has built a reputation as a brilliant winemaker, and is a reliable source of value for those who can't afford the top-level Burgundies. The grapes for this delightful Pinot Noir were grown in a sunny, mid-slope vineyard, ripening easily. 100% whole bunches were used in the fermentation, giving less extraction and more freshness. Super drinkable, with perfumed, poised red berry fruit, light oak influence and lovely acidity. A real vin de soif. 91/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£35.00
BU74021 BU74021 Domaine Cordier, Macon-Fuissé 2018

This delicious Mâcon-Fuissé is made by father-and-son team Roger and Christophe Cordier. They are always among the last to harvest every year, waiting till the grapes are fully ripe. There's still plenty of freshness here though, allied with citrus notes and some round butteriness. Impressive at the price. - Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£13.50
CB5961 CB5961 Château Lary Tagot, Bordeaux 2018

From vineyards in Entre-Deux-Mers, this everyday claret scores highly for the value it offers. Merlot-dominant, it has good freshness despite coming from the warm 2018 vintage. Juicy, dark fruit, some earthy notes and good typicity. Aged for 10-12 months in stainless steel. Straightforward, unfussy Bordeaux that should be enjoyed within the next year or two. 91/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£8.50
CE11361 CE11361 Undurraga Finca Las Lomas Leyda Sauvignon Gris 2020

Try sauvignon gris for a slightly different flavour profile to sauvignon blanc. You'll get the same green pea, asparagus and grassy flavours, but a broader, rounder feel, and an almost tangy tropical fruit richness to balance the zesty acidity. Lees ageing adds weight. 89/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£8.50
EN1611 EN1611 Camel Valley Bacchus, Cornwall 2020

Sales of English wine at The Wine Society have 'gone bananas' in the last few months, according to buyer Matthew Horsley. Bacchus is probably the most well-known white grape used for still wines in England, offering a fresh and aromatic character, with elderflower, hedgerow fragrance and some lime citrus zestiness. This bottling from the great 2020 vintage has 4.7g/L residual sugar to round out the palate, and is an easy-drinking alternative to sauvignon blanc that isn't too pungent. 89/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£13.95
FC39501 FC39501 Jurançon Geyser, Domaine Cauhapé 2019

The second wine of Domaine Cauhapé, this is made from grapes that will be unfamiliar to some wine lovers: Gros and Petit Manseng, Camaralet, Lauzet and Courbu. It's quite a rich, full-bodied, unoaked style, with a marked fragrance of grapefruit, and a lingering zestiness on the finish. Almost exotic in character, this would happily withstand quite robust flavours, even some spice. Try it with strong hard cheese, or fresh river fish. 90/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£13.95
FC39751 FC39751 Domaine Félines-Jourdan Rouge, Hérault 2019

The Pfalz is the one region in the country outperforming the rest, according to the Wine Society's buyer for Germany, Marcel Orford Williams. This wine is a slight oddity in that the grapes used to make it are all grown across the border in France's Alsace region – the border as it was drawn in 1945 cuts through the middle of the vineyards belonging to this small family estate. Dry, lively and uncomplicated, this pinot blanc is light to medium bodied, refreshing, with firm peach fruit flavours and good acidity. A good everyday food wine. 88/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£7.50
GE13551 GE13551 Weissburgunder, Weingut Jülg 2019

The Pfalz is the one region in the country outperforming the rest, according to the Wine Society's buyer for Germany, Marcel Orford Williams. This wine is a slight oddity in that the grapes used to make it are all grown across the border in France's Alsace region – the border as it was drawn in 1945 cuts through the middle of the vineyards belonging to this small family estate. Dry, lively and uncomplicated, this pinot blanc is light to medium bodied, refreshing, with firm peach fruit flavours and good acidity. A good everyday food wine. 88/100  Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£11.50
GR1881 GR1881 Armi Thrapsathiri, Domaine Lyrarakis 2019

The 14% alcohol may be off putting, but this new listing is entirely in balance and would be a good alternative to a white Rioja. This native Cretan grape variety (thrapsathiri) produces a rich, nutty, oxidised style of white wine, with fresh but relatively soft acidity, round, ripe stone fruit and lemon citrus notes, and a good length. It's been through barrel fermentation and a short ageing period in the same barrels, with batonnage. A good food wine for those occasions where you need a fuller-bodied white. - Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£14.50
GR1891 GR1891 Plakoura Mandilari, Domaine Lyrarakis 2017

The new listings from Domaine Lyrarakis (there's a white from the thrapsathiri grape too) show just what Crete is capable of producing, wine wise. Made 100% from the local mandilari grape variety, it was aged for a year in a mix of French and American oak, and has noticeable cedar, vanilla notes, along with grippy, rich dark berry fruits. A small proportion of the grapes were dried in the sun for three days to give added concentration and complexity. The tannins are pretty hefty, but starting to soften with age, and the acidity is still bright. A lovely food wine, you may want to decant before serving. 91/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£12.95
GR1951 GR1951 Xinomavro Naoussea, Ktima Foundi 2016

Greece is the fastest-growing region at The Wine Society, with sales more than tripling over the last year. This success is largely down to the success of the Greek red variety, xinomavro. Thymiopoulos' Jeunes Vignes is a Decanter favourite, but I'd urge you to seek out this new listing too. From the 2016 vintage, it's been aged for a year in French oak and then given a further 30 months of bottle age. It really is gorgeous, with some chewy nebbiolo character, bright red fruit and sundried tomato flavours. There's structure, minerality, good acidity and ripe tannins, making it a perfect match for roast lamb or aged sheep's cheese. The Jeunes Vignes is fresher and more youthful, but the extra age on this wine make it equally delicious, in a different style. 93/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£14.95
HU1661 HU1661 Dry Furmint Tokaji, Tokaj Nobilis 2019

Dry wines have always existed in Tokaj, but the move to purposely made, high quality dry wines is more recent. A perfect match for mildly spiced Asian dishes, this has spicy apple, ginger and yellow peach flavours. It's straight forward but good value at this price point. - Amy Wislocki

( Decanter 1st Apr 2021 )

£9.95
IT30851 IT30851 The Society’s Chianti 2018

The Society has gone to the cooler sub-region of Rufina for its own-label Chianti. At under a tenner, this is a great price for a light to medium-bodied Chianti that offers the trademark cherry fruit, with a slight hint of tomato too. Fragrant and food-friendly, with lovely typicity and a fresh finish. 91/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£9.95
IT31011 IT31011 The Society's Sicilian Reserve Red 2017

This guaranteed crowd-pleaser is a perennial favourite at The Wine Society. The Nero d'Avola grape produces a wine with abundant fleshy dark red fruit, ripe and with some oak influence from the 10 months in French barriques. Great, uncomplicated everyday drinking for those who like their red wines smooth, ripe and fruit forward. 90/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£8.95
JU1611 JU1611 Vin de Savoie, Mondeuse Terres Rouges, Jean-François Quénard 2019

An Alpine red made 100% from mondeuse. It's a grape that doesn't always ripen well, but excelled in the sensational 2019 vintage. Aged for 10 months in a mix of stainless steel and concrete eggs, this is modest in alcohol, with dark berry fruit and a hint of pepper. There's good acidity and freshness too. Reminiscent of some Loire reds, it would be a great match for charcuterie. 90/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£13.50
LE1161 LE1161 Château Ksara Old Vine Carignan, Lebanon 2018

New to The Wine Society's range, this delicious modern red is Château Ksara's first vintage of single-varietal Carignan. Aged in concrete, there's no oak, just focused, lively red fruit with a herbal twist. Good purity, good acidity, and great freshness. Would pair well with lamb chops. 91/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£11.95
NZ12231 NZ12231 Neudorf Tom's Block Nelson Pinot Noir 2017

Nelson isn't as famous as some other regions in New Zealand for Pinot Noir, but Neudorf is a top name there. Owners Tim and Judy Finn have produced a beautiful wine here, great value for a NZ Pinot at this level. It has some age, but the bright red fruit is still there in abundance, with structure and complexity, and some forest floor character behind. The wine has spent 10 months in French oak, 20% new. Aromatic, focused and linear, it's a food-friendly wine that you'll find it hard to resist pouring another glass of. 91/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£20.00
RH50561 RH50561 The Society's Exhibition Gigondas 2016

This terrific southern Rhône red was made by the talented owner and winemaker of Château Ste Cosme, Louis Barruol. 2016 was a fantastic vintage in the region, and this wine is full of appeal, bursting with spicy red fruits and yes, a definite note of fig, warm, with structure and depth of flavour. It's 15% alcohol but not out of balance, and you can't help but be seduced by the generosity of aroma and flavour. Would be a delicious match for roast lamb or beef. Yum. 93/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£18.00
SA16301 SA16301 Simonsig Frans Malan Cape Blend, Stellenbosch 2016

The 70% Pinotage in this blend (married with Cabernet Sauvignon and a dash of Merlot) gives this a real South African character. This is a robust red that would be a perfect match for a stew or even a meat curry. Aged for 15 months in mainly French (20% American) oak, it's full-on, rich and ripe with dark plummy fruit and oak framing. A good introduction to Pinotage as the other grapes in the blend temper the distinctive varietal character. It's already got some age on it, but would keep for another year or two. 89/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£18.50
SA16622 SA16622 Half bottle of The Liberator 'Napoleon Bona Part Five' Noble Late Harvest, Western Cape 2019

Two-thirds muscat and a third chenin blanc, this super-delicious sweet wine (160g/L residual sugar) – a limited-edition parcel – is fresh and youthful, with cane sugar sweetness and a weight of juicy, fleshy pineapple and apricot fruit. Great purity. Try it with blue cheese or a tarte tatin. 92/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£10.95
SH671 SH671 Cayetano del Pino Palo Cortado Solera

Bodegas Sánchez Romate is located in the historic centre of Jerez de la Frontera, one of the few bodegas still entirely owned by Jerez families. Palo cortado is a fino which loses its flor and so ages oxidatively. Around 17 years old, this wine is a real treat for lovers of dry Sherry, and a steal at this price. Elegant, nutty and complex, with real depth of flavour, there's sweetness on the nose but it's bone-dry to taste, with savoury, umami, mushroominess, nuts, spice and a lick of salinity. One to savour – enjoy over two to three weeks after opening. 94/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£16.00
SP16201 SP16201 Glorioso Reserva, Rioja 2016

This Rioja Reserva falls stylistically between the traditional and the modern, with fresh, vibrant fruit, and well-integrated French oak. Made by Bodegas Palacio, in the heart of Rioja Alavesa, it's drinking beautifully now but has life left in it yet if you want to keep it for a few years. If you prefer your Rioja to be aged in sweeter American oak, try The Society's Rioja Reserva from the equally good 2015 vintage. 90/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£12.50
SP16331 SP16331 The Society's Exhibition Rioja Reserva 2015

This is benchmark old school and will appeal to those who love the more traditional creamy style of Rioja. Produced by respected producer La Rioja Alta, the wine spends two years in American oak (the first year in new oak, and the second in four-year-old barrels), and there's clear evidence of that on the nose and palate, in the sweet coconut character. You can see some evolution in the glass, but there's still a generosity of rich, deep, dark fruit to complement the creamy oak. 90/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£16.50
SP16411 SP16411 Mancuso Garnacha, Carineña 2018

This garnacha from a small family estate has seen a year of ageing, in a mix of concrete and 500L French oak barrels. There's a discernible creamy, light oak influence, but it's fresh and floral at the same time, down to the slate soils, old vines (bush vines, 50 years old, hand picked), and 650m altitude. Dark berry character and the structure to match with robust meat dishes. 89/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£12.95
US9391 US9391 Elk Cove Vineyards Willamette Valley Estate Pinot Blanc 2019

a majority Pinot Blanc, with a smattering of viognier, gewurztraminer and chardonnay. It's early picked and unoaked, with 4g/L residual sugar to offset the acidity and some lees ageing (in steel) to add textural interest. Attractive limey character, and some stone fruit on the palate. A little pricey, but Oregon is never going to be a place for bargain hunting. Would pair well with salmon. 89/100 Amy Wislocki

( decanter.com 1st Apr 2021 )

£18.00
AA3081 AA3081 Familie Mantler Roter Veltliner, Niederösterreich 2019

It certainly packs an amazing punch for a wine with so little alcohol. Great extract and a certain spiciness but lots of tension too. The character is much more on the palate than the nose. Still a little astringent but not shamefully so. Very good value. 16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£8.95
AA3131 AA3131 Birgit Braunstein Pinot Blanc, Burgenland 2019

Pretty broad and intense on the nose and with a great combination of density of lightly floral fruit and tension on the palate. Real life here. Much more complex than most Pinot Blanc with grip on the finish. Very intense in general. Good value. 16.5/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£13.50
AU23151 AU23151 Pauletts Polish Hill River Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot 2017

Very deep crimson. Intense, ripe nose and rather pronounced acidity. Not bad but it could do with just a little more juicy fruit on the mid palate. Not exactly opulent; I suspect it will always be a bit chewy. But very Australian. 15.5/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£11.50
BG381 BG381 Bononia Estate Gamza 2019

This was the wine I recommended in my collection of wines for spring. Pale ruby. Soft, light, fruity and charming but not for long keeping. Very unlike most reds. Good value. 16.5/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£8.95
BJ8601 BJ8601 Beaujolais Blanc Classic, Les Terres Dorées 2019

This producer rarely disappoints, on either quality or value. Eat your heart out, Bourgogne Blanc. This is great value and is only a tad broader than most wines from further north. There is tension here and real stony character. Nothing remotely fat. You just know when tasting this wine that it is made by a producer who really cares. Good value. 16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£12.50
BJ8761 BJ8761 Beaujolais Les Pierres Dorées, Cuvée Louis Dépagneux 2020

It seems as though the Terres Dorées district of Beaujolais is suddenly modish – the work of Jean-Paul Brun? Really dark, concentrated crimson. And super-satisfying for the money, Quite luscious gamay fruit. Good value - Jancis Robinson MW

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£8.50
BU69901 BU69901 Domaine Sylvain Pataille, Marsannay Les Longeroies 2017

Not even The Wine Society can resist the upward shift of Burgundy prices. But Sylvain Pataille is well worth following, and this is a particularly approachable vintage. Quite a deep garnet. Rich nose that is so much more complex than most non-burgundy pinots. Lovely freshness on the end. Very flattering. And in a Burgundian context you have to say that this is good value. 16.5/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£35.00
BU75991 BU75991 Domaine de la Rochette Mont Sard, Mâcon-Bussières 2019

Deep straw colour. Rather a flinty nose and then generously broad on the palate with quite a bit of honeyed stone-fruit quality. Even a suggestion of toffee – thanks to the warm vintage? Nicely balanced and certainly not fat. Not for the very long term but good value. 16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£14.95
CB5961 CB5961 Château Lary Tagot, Bordeaux 2018

Crazy price! Deep crimson. Clean and appetising with perhaps not the depth and ageability of a bordeaux grandee but, say, a bordeaux blend from anywhere else would cost so much more! Deep colour, deep flavour and great balance. Sweet start and dry end. Very good value. 16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£8.50
CE10971 CE10971 Undurraga Candelabro Itata Cinsault 2019

Translucent ruby. Penetrating, slightly gamey nose. Then delightfully sweet, red-cherry fruit and virtually no tannin but with refreshing acidity. So much character (and back story – put Itata in our search box) for just £7.50. Well bought! Though I just hope those poor farmers are being suitably rewarded. Truly charming – and a useful summer red that could be sipped without food. Very good value. 16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£7.50
CE11321 CE11321 Concha y Toro Corte Ignacio Casablanca Sauvignon Blanc 2020

Actually this is less powerfully aromatic than the Undurraga Sauvignon Gris … but it's lovely on the palate with a fresh whoosh of greenery across the palate and is clean as a whistle. Very refreshing and rather crystalline in texture. The perfect spring wine? Though a little more fleeting than the Sauvignon Gris.  16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£8.95
CE11361 CE11361 Undurraga Finca Las Lomas Leyda Sauvignon Gris 2020

Smells less perfumed and more sauvignon blanc than many examples of this grape. But there's a little more breadth on the palate and most lovers of NZ SB should pounce on this wine that offers more palate depth and the same aromatic delivery than most at this price. Quite persistent. Undurraga are on a roll. Good value. 16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£8.50
CM19301 CM19301 Château Dutruch Grand Poujeaux, Moulis-en-Médoc 2015

Very deep purplish crimson still. Lovely fresh lift on the nose. Bone-dry finish but a luscious start and just what you want from a modern Médoc. Silly price. The interesting thing here is the drinking window: I'd say it has only just started and may not go on for as long as wines from some more illustrious properties but this is a great bet for the elderly! Lovely bite and balance.  16.5/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£20.00
EN1611 EN1611 Camel Valley Bacchus, Cornwall 2020

Technically perfect, with good balance of fruit and (marked) acidity. I'm not 100% sure this is the wine to win-over a doubting Frenchman but it certainly doesn't have any faults. 15.5/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£13.95
FC39501 FC39501 Jurançon Geyser, Domaine Cauhapé 2019

Look at all those local grape varieties! Glowing transparent copper colour. Really intense green-fruit nose and massive extract on the palate. Surprisingly accessible already. Odd that they are still using synthetic corks. Crunchy fruit and masses of character. Super-tangy and with real, admirable grip on the end. You could have a lot of fun trying different foods for this. Creamy pâté? Anything in a creamy sauce. 16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£13.95
FC39751 FC39751 Domaine Félines-Jourdan Rouge, Hérault 2019

Deep lustrous purplish crimson. Still very youthful nose with the fruit only just formed. But clean and fresh and reaches every crevice of the palate. Sweet but not too sweet. Not at all industrial. Straightforward sun-ripened fruit with a hint of warm tomato-skin scent. Far from complex but definitely good value. 16/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£7.50
GE13551 GE13551 Weissburgunder, Weingut Jülg 2019

Good tension on the palate and a light buttered popcorn pinot blanc flavour with a good positive finish. Lime sherbet. 15.5/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£11.50
GR1881 GR1881 Armi Thrapsathiri, Domaine Lyrarakis 2019

Deep gold. Really interesting blend of leafiness (like so many Cretan white-wine varieties!) with a rich, burnished quality. Great grip on the broad palate without being uncomfortably astringent or oaky. The evolution of this unusual wine should be so interesting to follow. Silly price. Very good value. 16.5+/20

( JancisRobinson.com 31st Mar 2021 )

£14.50

Want more inspiration?

Sign up for a carefully-curated selection of recipes, guides, in-depth expertise and much more.

Our website uses cookies with the aim of providing you with a better service. By using this website you consent to The Wine Society using cookies in accordance with our policy.

Close

4.4. Cookie Policy

By using The Wine Society website, you agree to cookies being used in accordance with the policy outlined below. If you do not agree to this, you must alter your browser settings to turn off cookies or block those types which are unacceptable to you or cease using the website.

The Wine Society uses cookies to enable easy navigation and shopping on the website. We take the privacy of all who use our website very seriously and ensure that our use of cookies complies with current EU legislation. The following guide outlines what cookies are, the types of cookies used on The Society's website and how they work.

You may alter your browser settings to turn off cookies or block those types which are unacceptable to you, but this will cause difficulties when accessing and using some areas of the site. Instructions on how to do this can also be found below.

4.4.1. What are 'Cookies'?

  • Most major websites use cookies.
  • A cookie is a very small data file placed on your hard drive by a web page server. It is essentially your access card, and cannot be executed as code or deliver viruses. It is uniquely yours and can only be read by the server that gave it to you.
  • Cookies cannot be used by themselves to identify you.
  • The purpose of a basic cookie is to tell the server that you returned to that web page or have items in your basket. Without cookies, websites and their servers have no memory. A cookie, like a key, enables swift passage from one place to the next.
  • Without a cookie every time you open a new web page the server where that page is stored will treat you like a completely new visitor.
  • More recently, cookies have also been used to collect information about the user which allows a profile of their preferences and interests to be created so that they can be served with interest-based rather than generic information about available goods and services.

4.4.2. How do Cookies help The Wine Society?

Cookies allow our website to function effectively. Cookies also help us to arrange content to match your preferred interests more quickly. We can learn what information is important to our visitors, and what isn't.

4.4.3. How does The Wine Society use cookies?

The Wine Society does not accept advertising from third parties and therefore, as a rule, does not serve third-party cookies. Exceptions to this include performance/analytical cookies (see below), used anonymously to improve the way our website works, the provision of personalised recommendations, and occasions when we may team up with suppliers to offer special discounts on goods or services.

The Society uses technology to track the patterns of behaviour of visitors to our site.

4.4.4. What type of cookies does The Wine Society use?

We use the following three types of cookies:

4.4.4.1. Strictly Necessary Cookies
These cookies are required for the operation of our website, enabling you to move around the website and use its features, such as accessing secure areas of the website. Without these cookies, services like shopping baskets or e-billing cannot be provided. Under this heading, we currently use the following cookies:

  • Authentication Cookie and Anonymous Cookie
    These cookies remember that you are logged in to your account – without them, the website would repeatedly request your login details with each new page you visit during your time on our website. They are removed once your session has ended.
  • Session Cookie
    These cookies are used to remember who you are as you use our site: without them, the website would be unable to tell the difference between you and another Wine Society member and facilities such as your basket and the checkout process would therefore not be able to function. They too are removed once your session has ended.

4.4.4.2. Functionality & Targeting/Tracking Cookies
These cookies are used to recognise you when you return to our website and to provide enhanced features. This allows us to personalise our content for you. Under this heading, we currently use the following cookies:

  • Unique User Cookie
    This cookie is used to:
    • store your share number in order to identify that you have visited the website before. Without this cookie, we would be unable to tell whether you are a member or not.
    • record your visit to the website, the pages you have visited and the links you have followed. We use this information to make our website, the content displayed on it and direct marketing communications we may send to you or contact you about more relevant to your interests.
    • This cookie expires after 13 months.
  • Peerius Cookies
    These third-party cookies are used to provide you with personalised recommendations based on your purchase and browsing history. They expire within 4 hours of your visit.

4.4.4.3. Performance/analytical cookies
These cookies collect information about how visitors use a website, for instance which pages visitors go to most often, and if they get error messages from web pages. These cookies don't collect information which identifies a visitor. All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. It is only used to improve how a website works. Under this heading, we currently use the following cookies:

  • Google Analytics Cookies
    These are third-party cookies to enable Google Analytics to monitor website traffic. All information is recorded anonymously. Using Google Analytics allows The Society to better understand how members use our site and monitor website traffic.

4.4.4.4. Authentication Cookie
In order for us to ensure that your data remains secure it is necessary for us to verify that your session is authentic (i.e. it has not been compromised by a malicious user). We do this by storing an otherwise meaningless unique ID in a cookie for the duration of your visit. No personal information can be gained from this cookie.

4.4.5. How do you turn cookies off?

All modern browsers allow you to modify your cookie settings so that all cookies, or those types which are not acceptable to you, are blocked. However, please note that this may affect the successful functioning of the site, particularly if you block all cookies, including essential cookies. For example, In Internet Explorer, go to the Tools Menu, then go to Internet Options, then go to Privacy. Here you can change the rules your browser uses to accept cookies. You can find out more in the public sources mentioned below.

4.4.6. Learn more about cookies

4.4.7. Changes to our cookie policy

Any changes we may make to our cookie policy in the future will be posted on the website and, where appropriate, notified to you by email. Please check back frequently to see any updates and changes to our cookie policy.