Pronunciation guide to grape varieties (A-G)

The Society's audio guide to grape pronunciation gives members more than a fighting chance of being able to get their mouths around even the most challenging sounding of varieties. Click on the grape name to hear our recommendation of how to say the name.

For extended profiles of some of the more common grape varieties see our Guide to grapes.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G

Pronunciation guide to grape varieties (H-S) | Pronunciation guide to grape varieties (T-Z)


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Aglianico


This high-quality Italian red is grown almost exclusively in southern Italy and is at its best in the mountainous vineyards of Campania and Basilicata. High levels of tannin and acidity and its attractive perfume have led to it being known as the Barolo of the south. Read more

Click here for wines from the aglianico grape


Albariño


High quality, fashionable aromatic white variety from Spanish/Portuguese borders (known as alvarinho in Portugal). Read more

Click here for wines from the albarino grape


Alvarinho


Mainly grown in the Minho (known as albariño in Spain), this produces crisp, aromatic wines with notes of peach, apple and citrus fruits with a mineral character.

Click here for wines from the alvarinho grape


Assyrtiko


High-quality Greek white found mainly on the island of Santorini making mineral wines with good structure.

Click here for wines from the assyrtiko grape


Auxerrois


Today this white variety is only really found in Alsace and Luxembourg where it makes characterful slightly spicy wines, somewhere between pinot blanc and pinot gris in style. Read more

Click here for wines from the auxerrois grape


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Barbera


Versatile red grape from Italy's north-west which, with its zippy acidity and smooth tannins makes classic pizza & pasta wine. Can make for more distinguished bottles in the right hands too. Read more

Click here for wines from the barbera grape


Blaufränkisch


Dark-skinned Austro-Hungarian variety (known as kékfrankos in Hungary) making full-bodied, rich wines.

Click here for wines from the blaufränkisch grape


Bourboulenc


An ancient variety of southern France which may be of Greek origins. Really thrives on the limestone outcrop of La Clape where the wines are fresh and almost have a salty tang to them.

Click here for wines from the bourboulenc grape


Bourgogne Aligoté


Burgundy's lesser known white variety generally makes quite tart, neutral wines that are light in body. The locals often mix with crème de cassis to make kir. Read more

Click here for wines from the aligoté grape


Brunello


Just one of the many synonyms of the sangiovese grape, Tuscany's foremost quality red variety and the grape behind Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montalcino. Read more

Click here for wines from the brunello grape


Bual



Also known as boal on the island of Madeira, but officially, the grape is malvasia fina, a high-quality Portuguese variety.

Click here for wines from the bual grape


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Cabernet Franc


The parent of cabernet sauvignon is at home in the Loire Valley and an important constituent in Bordeaux blends.

Click here for wines from the cabernet franc grape


Cabernet Sauvignon


One of the world's most travelled and renowned quality red grape variety whose homeland is in the south west of France. Read more

Click here for wines from the cabernet sauvignon grape


Carignan


Known as mazuelo in Spain, this dark-skinned tannic red was always considered something of a workhorse variety in the vineyards of southern France but old plantings have revealed it to be a star in its own right.

Click here for wines from the carignan grape


Chardonnay


One of the top international whites and the grape behind white Burgundy, capable of making a wide variety of styles of wine. Read more

Click here for wines from the chardonnay grape


Chenin Blanc


Versatile white Loire grape that has found its second home in South Africa making everything from sparkling to dry to dessert whites for long ageing. Read more

Click here for wines from the chenin blanc grape


Ciliegiolo


Cherry-flavoured Tuscan red grape that is often used to soften sangiovese in Chianti. Occasionally found as 100% varietal in the Maremma.

Click here for wines from the ciliegiolo grape


Cinsault


Click here for wines from the cinsault grape


Clairette


Click here for wines from the clairette grape


Colombard


Click here for wines from the colombard grape


Corvina


Click here for wines from the corvina grape


Cserszegi


Click here for wines from the Cserszegi grape


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Dolcetto


Literally translated as 'little sweet one' due to its low acitity, this fragrant Piedmont red makes soft, fruity wines usually for early drinking.

Click here for wines from the dolcetto grape


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Fer Servadou


This tannic red grape from Marcillac in France's south-west is little found elseshere and goes by a number of confusing synonyms.

Read more

Click here for wines from the fer servadou grape


Fiano


Click here for wines from the fiano grape


Frappato


Click here for wines from the frappato grape


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Gaglioppo


Calabria's best-known red grape and the grape behind the characterful Cirò wines which often have a characteristic aroma of roses.

Click here for wines from the gaglioppo grape


Gamay


This ancient Burgundian variety is the grape behind Beaujolais and generally makes soft, fruity reds for early drinking. Read more

Click here for wines from the gamay grape


Gamza


Click here for wines from the gamza grape


Garganega


This white from Veneto is the main constituent of Soave.

Click here for wines from the garganega grape


Garnacha


Click here for wines from the garnacha grape


Gewurztraminer


This distinctive heady white variety whose spiritual home is in Alsace makes anything from full-bodied dry wines to luscious dessert bottles. Read more

Click here for wines from the gewurztraminer grape


Godello


This high-quality white from north-west Spain makes concentrated wines with distinct minerality. Read more

Click here for wines from the godello grape


Grechetto


Click here for wines from the grechetto grape


Greco Di Tufa


Click here for wines from the greco di tufa grape


Grenache


Click here for wines from the grenache grape


Grenache Blanc


Click here for wines from the grenache blanc grape


Grenache Gris


Click here for wines from the grenache gris grape


Gros Manseng


Click here for wines from the gros manseng grape


Grüner Veltliner


Click here for wines from the grüner veltliner grape

Members' Comments (2)

"Thank you for doing this, I can bluff more effectively. Now only "a few" place names to improve."

Mr Jonathan White (05-Aug-2016)

"I believe Cserszegi is pronounced with the stress on the first syllable like the great majority of Hungarian words."

Mrs Lucy M Forster (05-Aug-2016)

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