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Domaine Méo Camuzet

With numerous vineyard holdings throughout Vosne-Romanée, Nuits-St-George and Vougeot, not to mention a single but equally prestigious outpost at Corton, Méo-Camuzet are very well placed indeed to make top-quality Burgundy. They possess 15 acres of their own vines and a further 13.5 acres under contract but it was not always that way. Until recent years the vast majority of the vineyards were owned by sharecroppers who supplied the domaine with grapes, and it was not until 1985 that domaine bottling was begun rather than selling the wines to négociants.

Nowadays, instead of the previous benign but absentee landlord, Jean Méo, there is a stronger guiding hand in the form of his son Jean-Nicolas Méo, a slightly removed descendant of the early 20th-century founder Etienne Camuzet. Jean-Nicolas wisely worked with the advice of the late great Henri Jayer and his right hand man is Christian Faurois. Both were sharecroppers and Jayer was a legend among Burgundy producers for the quality of his wines. Christian Faurois knows the domaine like the back of his hand and has been an invaluable resource for Jean-Nicolas to draw on as he has put his own stamp on the wines.

Most of the vineyards are farmed organically and fastidious care is taken to ensure the well-being of the vines themselves. Jean-Nicolas has no doubts whatsoever about the relationship between the harmony of the vines and their terroir and the quality of the wine that ensues. Much work is done pruning, green harvesting, managing the canopy and manually harvesting, before the grapes are sorted with great care at the winery. All the grapes are destemmed prior to a pre-fermentation maceration. When the must has fermented the wine will spend time in barrel, grand cru wines in 100% new oak, premier cru in 75% and villages wines in 50%, but the amount of new wood is under review and may change in the future. Little sulphur is used in the winemaking process and bottling is carried using only the force of gravity and without filtration.

The domaine has now established a négociant property, Méo-Camuzet frères et soeurs.

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