This is a carousel with zoom. Use the thumbnails to navigate, or jump to a slide. Use the zoom button to zoom into a image.

Low stock

Blandy's Terrantez, 20 years old 50cl

Madeira from Madeira
Delicious, complex Madeira with all the structure of a sumptuous sweet wine but with less of the sugar. Many believe the terrantez grape shows Madeira wine at its absolute best, combining the steely dryness of sercial and the sublime richness and opulence of bual. Tragically, it all but disappeared from Madeira following the phylloxera devastation of the late 19th century, after which there was little appetite to replant such a low-yielding and particularly awkward grape to grow.Thankfully, Blandy's is still flying the flag. And what a delicious example this 20-year-old wine is. It has a tinge of green to the deep amber colour with wonderfully intense aromas of nuts, spice and dried fruit and a lingering concentrated dry aftertaste.
Price: £52.00 Bottle
Price: £312.00 Case of 6 (out of stock)
Low stock
Code: MA401

Wine characteristics

  • Madeira
  • Dessert sweetness
  • 20% Alcohol
  • Bouquet/flavour marked by oak
  • 50cl
  • Stopper cork, ie sherry

Madeira Wine Company

The Madeira Wine Company has come a long way since it was formed in 1913: today, it accounts for around 35% of the island’s total Madeira production.

It began as the joint venture of two producers who wanted to survive a bleak economic period by pooling their resources and reducing costs. They formed the Madeira Wine Association, and over the years several other companies joined them to brave the increasingly competitive and costly market.

One of the most notable additions was Blandy’s, who came on board in 1925, at the same time as Leacock’s. Along with Cossart Gordon and Co, who joined in 1953, and Rutherford and Miles, these four companies today make up the main brands associated with the company’s premium Madeira production.

Blandy’s is the company that has had by far the most involvement in the running of organisation, perhaps due to its significant experience: the only remaining Madeira company that is still family-run, in 2011 it celebrated 200 years of production, having made a considerable contribution to the history and development of Madeira.

John Ernest Blandy became chairman of the Madeira Wine Company in 1925. His right-hand man was a previous Blandy’s manager, Thomas L Mullins, who instilled in the union a spirit of keeping each company true to its own style while reducing overheads. This ethos exists to this day, which is perhaps why the organisation has lasted as long as it has.

The Madeira Wine Association didn’t become The Madeira Wine Company until 1981. By...
The Madeira Wine Company has come a long way since it was formed in 1913: today, it accounts for around 35% of the island’s total Madeira production.

It began as the joint venture of two producers who wanted to survive a bleak economic period by pooling their resources and reducing costs. They formed the Madeira Wine Association, and over the years several other companies joined them to brave the increasingly competitive and costly market.

One of the most notable additions was Blandy’s, who came on board in 1925, at the same time as Leacock’s. Along with Cossart Gordon and Co, who joined in 1953, and Rutherford and Miles, these four companies today make up the main brands associated with the company’s premium Madeira production.

Blandy’s is the company that has had by far the most involvement in the running of organisation, perhaps due to its significant experience: the only remaining Madeira company that is still family-run, in 2011 it celebrated 200 years of production, having made a considerable contribution to the history and development of Madeira.

John Ernest Blandy became chairman of the Madeira Wine Company in 1925. His right-hand man was a previous Blandy’s manager, Thomas L Mullins, who instilled in the union a spirit of keeping each company true to its own style while reducing overheads. This ethos exists to this day, which is perhaps why the organisation has lasted as long as it has.

The Madeira Wine Association didn’t become The Madeira Wine Company until 1981. By this point, although Blandy’s were still running the company, it knew that even its wealth of experience wasn’t enough to achieve the worldwide distribution it needed. The team sought the help of renowned port brand Symington’s, with whom the company formed a partnership in 1989.

It wasn’t just the Madeira Wine Company’s distribution needs that Symington’s met – they also advised the various producers involved on their branding, and brought production methods at the company’s winery to modern, state-of-the-art standards. In 2000, the Madeira Wine Company completed a huge renovation project to improve its blending and storage facilities.

Although Symington’s is still involved with the company, Blandy’s took control again in 2011, with the appointment of Chris Blandy as chief executive. Since taking over again, Blandy’s has overseen the purchase of the company’s first vineyards: although, as is the norm, most of its grapes come from selected growers across the island, the company now has a few select plots of its own.

The wine is all made at the company’s winery in Mercês, where the team also have a cooperage to make all its own casks. Winemaking is overseen by the award-winning Francisco Albequerque, who expertly manages to produce each of the four leading brands in their respective individual styles.

When it comes to maturation, the company ages a large portion of its oldest wines using the traditional canteiro system, whereby wines are gently warmed in the lofts of the winery. Although this natural method isn’t suitable for younger wines, such as The Society’s Full Rich Madeira, it is perhaps a testament to how dearly the company holds its rich and long heritage.
Read more

Cambridge News

Almost extinct now,terrantez is the 'pinot noir' of Madeira grapes, making elegant, elusive wines.Deep amber colour with wonderfully intense aromas of muts, spice and driedfruit and a lingering,...
Almost extinct now,terrantez is the 'pinot noir' of Madeira grapes, making elegant, elusive wines.Deep amber colour with wonderfully intense aromas of muts, spice and driedfruit and a lingering, concentrated, dry aftertaste.
Read more

- Tom Lewis

JancisRobinson.com

Hooray for Blandy'sunder Chris Blandy who is working so hard to put the company back on the map.Last year saw the launch of 1998 Verdelho and Sercial Colheitas. This year'srabbit pulled from a hat ...
Hooray for Blandy'sunder Chris Blandy who is working so hard to put the company back on the map.Last year saw the launch of 1998 Verdelho and Sercial Colheitas. This year'srabbit pulled from a hat on the Atlantic island is this bottling of analmost-extinct grape variety, originally designed to commemorate Blandy'sbicentenary in 2011. Pale reddish tawny ('topaz' according to Blandy's notes).Smells just slightly sweaty/cheesy. But on the palate there is all the grip,intensity and acidity of fine madeira with some extra smokiness. It starts richbut definitely finishes dry. This should make it extra versatile. Really cleanand fresh. I will definitely be looking for a revitalising glass of this atvarious points over Christmas. This is ready to enjoy now. Considering therarity and the age, this is relatively good value.
Read more

18/20 Jancis Robinson

Financial Times

£45 may seem quiteexpensive but the Terrantez grape is exceptionally rare. Good for Chris Blandyfor giving us all the chance to try this smoky, grippy rarity. It would begreat with cheese.

- Jancis Robinson

The Mail on Sunday

This orangey, vibrantand tangy Madeira is a delicious treat with a mince pie for Santa.

- Olly Smith

Recommended for you

Back to top