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Condrieu Clos Boucher, Delas Frères 2008

White Wine from France - Rhone
Extravagant, weighty viognier from Delas family holdings just north of Château-Grillet.
is no longer available
Code: RH25581

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • 3 - Dry, rich
  • Viognier
  • 13% Alcohol
  • bouquet/flavour marked by oak
  • Cork, natural

Northern Rhône

A narrow, funnel-shaped vineyard extends on both sides of the Rhône from Vienne in the north to Valance in the south. The scenery is often dramatic with many of the vineyards perched precariously on the steep valley sides. The wines match the scenery: deeply coloured, fine, spicy reds made from the syrah grape and rich, full-bodied whites made from marsanne and roussanne grapes, or the more aromatic viognier up in Condrieu. Granite, sandy silica and clay soils predominate though small traces of limestone may also be found in Hermitage, Crozes and Cornas.

Production here is relatively small, accounting for less than 3% of the total for the Rhône Valley. Most of the wines are sold by appellation with three being white only, two red only and three others where both red and white can be made. The appellation Côtes-du-Rhône is rarely seen in the north and may well disappear altogether. On the other hand, full use is made of the vin de pays/vin de France category which allows producers to...
A narrow, funnel-shaped vineyard extends on both sides of the Rhône from Vienne in the north to Valance in the south. The scenery is often dramatic with many of the vineyards perched precariously on the steep valley sides. The wines match the scenery: deeply coloured, fine, spicy reds made from the syrah grape and rich, full-bodied whites made from marsanne and roussanne grapes, or the more aromatic viognier up in Condrieu. Granite, sandy silica and clay soils predominate though small traces of limestone may also be found in Hermitage, Crozes and Cornas.

Production here is relatively small, accounting for less than 3% of the total for the Rhône Valley. Most of the wines are sold by appellation with three being white only, two red only and three others where both red and white can be made. The appellation Côtes-du-Rhône is rarely seen in the north and may well disappear altogether. On the other hand, full use is made of the vin de pays/vin de France category which allows producers to make slightly simpler wines from young vines or from vines that for one reason or another were not included in any appellation.

Seyssuel
There is no appellation Seyssuel. These steep vineyards on the left bank close to Vienne were once famous but fell into obscurity after phylloxera wiped them out in the 19th century. Since the late 1990s, however, there has been a move to reclaim this valuable land for the vine. Many growers are involved here and the results are extremely good. The wines are broadly similar to Côte-Rôtie in style but maybe riper and more dramatic, the vines, after all, face the evening sun and there is more heat here than in Côte-Rôtie. Full appellation status is probably just a few years away after the efforts of Ogier, Villard and Villa have done so much to put it on the map.

Côte-Rôtie
Red only. The “roasted slope”, only half an hour’s drive south of Beaujolais, this northernmost outpost of the syrah grape produces wines that at times can match Burgundy for delicacy and charm. The vineyard is very steep with an incline of as much as 60 degrees. Guigal is the most important producer attracting the highest prices, but there are dozens of smallholders making interesting wines. Guigal has made new oak very fashionable and many growers use it sometimes to excess.

Condrieu
White only from the viognier grape. The scent of apricot in a good example of Condrieu is almost intoxicating. Rapid expansion of vineyards means that there are lots of young vines and therefore wines that lack substance, so there is good reason to get to know the better growers, such as André Perret, François Villard and Christophe Pichon, and follow them..

Saint-Joseph
Reds from syrah and whites from marsanne and roussanne; reds are more exciting. The best Saint-Josephs have class and can be good value. Some of the best slopes are only now being replanted after years of neglect, so huge potential. Many top producers have started to bring out single-vineyard Saint-Josephs. All can be brilliant and though pricey, offer better value than top-end Côte-Rôties for example. Look for the grower’s name.

Crozes-Hermitage
Reds are made from syrah and whites from marsanne and roussanne. Crozes-Hermitage accounts for more than half of the northern Rhône and its wines are plentiful and accessible. Reds are better than whites. Crozes-Hermitage comes in two parts. The largest is on the flat, close to the river and what would have been a river bed. It produces deeply coloured reds that are soft and fruity and without question a perfect introduction to the syrah of the north. The other part is behind the hill of Hermitage, sometimes on granite but mostly on white clay and limestone. This is the historic heart of Crozes producing wines of interest and substance and the whites from here can be outstanding too.


Hermitage
Syrah for reds, marsanne with a little roussanne for whites. This amazing southfacing slope has the greatest pedigree of any wine in the Rhône Valley. Its complex geology ensures added interest and complexity and in good years, Hermitage may sit at the highest tables. The downside is that the quality and reputation of Hermitage wines from the best producers means that there is a very limited supply of the best wines, and prices are set to rise.


Cornas
Red only from syrah. It is a small appellation nestling in a half amphitheatre of mostly granite, all facing fully south. The climate here is significantly warmer so Cornas is often among the first to harvest. Wines are black, thick and often tannic in their youth. Style is changing and quality is on the up, almost matching Hermitage. Cornas remains an uncompromising wine and rewards good food. Always decant.

Saint-Péray
White only made from marsanne and roussanne. The granite of Cornas gives way to limestone. The wines have more acidity and keep well. For some unaccountable reason, historically, most of the wine was sparkling but mercifully things are changing. There is big potential for fine whites. Producer’s name is essential.

The Drôme Valley
This is a major tributary of the Rhône that rises in the Alps and joins up with the Rhône to the south of Valence. At the western end there are a few vineyards, mostly of syrah and sold as Côtes-du- Rhône Brézème. This is rare, very little known and amazingly good-value source for Crozes-like reds. Further east, the landscape becomes more mountainous and the grapes mostly white, clairette and muscat and wines are mostly sparkling. Clairette de Die is light and sweet, a bit like Italian Asti, while Crémant de Die is dry and full-flavoured.
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Delas Frères

Delas Frères is one of the smaller Rhône négociants. Founded in the 19th century, it maintained its independence until 1978, when it was purchased by the Champagne house, Deutz, now part of Louis Roederer. Its declining reputation was turned around by winemaker Jacques Grange, of Burgundian roots, who came on board in 1997 and was extremely instrumental in improving quality and revitalising an underperforming range. The 1999 vintage in particular was significant as the Delas wines caught the attention of American critic Robert Parker.

Both reds and whites are excellent here. All are very expressive of the terroir, as is Jacques Grange’s aim. Traditionally Delas have been strong in Saint-Joseph where they have marketed reds from the famous Côte Sainte Epine above the cellars at Saint Jean de Muzols. A point of interest here for railway buffs and gourmets alike is an old train line, open during summer, which goes from Tournon up through the gorge of the river Doux to the hill town of Lamastre. Buyer Marcel Orford-Williams says, “I’ve never done it but it looks fun and there is an especially fine one star Michelin restaurant when you get there.”

Delas owns some vineyard sites on Hermitage but the majority is rented from the Marquis de la Tourette, an Ardechois aristocrat. Other holdings still owned by the Delas family include a sizeable plot of Bessards in Hermitage, along with some Côte- Rôtie, Condrieu and, of course, Crozes-Hermitage.

Rhône Vintage 2008

Several formidable opponents faced the vignerons of the Rhône during 2008, and it required all their skill to overcome the rain, rot and mildew that threatened the vintage. It was the Mistral wind in September that swept through the valley, changing the weather and averting certain catastrophe.

The challenging conditions meant that only the most conscientious growers, who carefully manage their vineyards and whose yields were voluntarily low, produced the ripe and healthy grapes necessary for successful, balanced wines in 2008. It also required determination and the ability to employ far more pickers for the vintage.

Northern Rhône

An already small crop was reduced further by mildew during flowering. August was cold and September began with storms, but luckily the grapes were not yet ripe and they caught up once the fine weather came in mid-September. From then on conditions were perfect and grapes were picked in excellent conditions. Nonetheless, vigilance was necessary in selection to...
Several formidable opponents faced the vignerons of the Rhône during 2008, and it required all their skill to overcome the rain, rot and mildew that threatened the vintage. It was the Mistral wind in September that swept through the valley, changing the weather and averting certain catastrophe.

The challenging conditions meant that only the most conscientious growers, who carefully manage their vineyards and whose yields were voluntarily low, produced the ripe and healthy grapes necessary for successful, balanced wines in 2008. It also required determination and the ability to employ far more pickers for the vintage.

Northern Rhône

An already small crop was reduced further by mildew during flowering. August was cold and September began with storms, but luckily the grapes were not yet ripe and they caught up once the fine weather came in mid-September. From then on conditions were perfect and grapes were picked in excellent conditions. Nonetheless, vigilance was necessary in selection to remove rot-affected berries. By and large there is much to applaud in all appellations but Cornas and Saint-Joseph stood out. Most are for short to mid-term drinking. Many of the wines now show real merit with fine, elegant lines and certain delicacy. All are now ready for drinking

Southern Rhône

There was more variability in the south. Gigondas, traditionally picked late, benefited most from the late summer. Otherwise the wines are fruity, lighter in style than either 2007 or 2009 and best drunk now.

A good vintage for white wines. They have fruit, freshness and often structure.
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