Cuvée George de Puygueraud, Côtes de Francs 2007 is no longer available

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Cuvée George de Puygueraud, Côtes de Francs 2007

Red Wine from France - Bordeaux
An unusual claret made with a high percentage of malbec, 45%, which Georges Thienpont, who bought the property, particularly liked. The balance is 35% cabernet franc and 20% merlot.
is no longer available
Code: CS6791

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Malbec/Cot
  • 13.5% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Cork, natural

Bourg, Blaye, 1er Cotes

The best growers in the less-fashionable regions of the satellite appellations Blaye, Bourg, and the old Premières Côtes have to work that bit harder to get their wines known and the quality is often exceedingly high while the prices remain sensible.

Blaye is the northernmost of these satellites, named after the town of Blaye (pronounced ‘Bly’), which sits on the varied soils of the right-hand shore of the great Gironde estuary. Merlot dominates and the majority of the wines are soft and easy-drinking, balanced and flavourful, but without the dominance of new oak. The wines are usually ready to drink much sooner than those of neighbouring Bourg.

Côtes de Bourg is a smaller region south of Blaye, where the Dordogne joins the Garonne to become the Gironde. The soils here are more homogenously clay with limestone and the wines, though still generally merlot dominated, are more robust with delectable tannins, and they benefit from a little more time in bottle as a result. They can...
The best growers in the less-fashionable regions of the satellite appellations Blaye, Bourg, and the old Premières Côtes have to work that bit harder to get their wines known and the quality is often exceedingly high while the prices remain sensible.

Blaye is the northernmost of these satellites, named after the town of Blaye (pronounced ‘Bly’), which sits on the varied soils of the right-hand shore of the great Gironde estuary. Merlot dominates and the majority of the wines are soft and easy-drinking, balanced and flavourful, but without the dominance of new oak. The wines are usually ready to drink much sooner than those of neighbouring Bourg.

Côtes de Bourg is a smaller region south of Blaye, where the Dordogne joins the Garonne to become the Gironde. The soils here are more homogenously clay with limestone and the wines, though still generally merlot dominated, are more robust with delectable tannins, and they benefit from a little more time in bottle as a result. They can develop extremely well with short to mid-term cellaring.

Before the draining of the marshes of the Médoc in the 17th century it was these areas that provided a good deal of the wine exported to Britain.

Castillon adjoins Saint-Emilion to the east along the Dordogne and inland to the north. It is developing a good reputation for its wines and several prestigious producers from neighbouring appellations have invested a good deal to make wine here and too very good effect alongside a number of excellent locals such as Château de Pitray. Merlot again dominates on a mixture of soils from clay to sand and gravel, though cabernet sauvignon is also has a presence.

A wider umbrella appellation controlee called simply Côtes de Bordeaux identifies special terroirs, which includes Blaye and Castillon with one or two others on the banks of the two rivers Garonne and Dordogne. The vast majority of production is red, made mostly from merlot, and there are many excellent producers here, such as Denis Dubourdieu.
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Château Puygueraud

Though the Côtes de Francs appellation didn’t exist until 1976, Georges Thienpont purchased this property in 1946. The vineyards had been devastated by the two World Wars, so for many years he used the property to grow cereal and keep cattle, but in 1979 he judged the estate ready for replanting. In 1983 he was assisted in producing the first vintage by his son, Nicolas Thienpont, a highly respected winemaker who is now responsible not only for Puygueraud but also top Saint-Emilion properties like Berliquet and Larcis Ducasse.

This property accounts for 35 of the 450 hectares in the Côtes de Francs appellation. With relatively cool clay soil, Puygueraud succeeds best in hot years when it delivers rich fruit and retains freshness. Since 2005 most of the cabernet sauvignon vines have been replaced with cabernet franc as it better suits this terroir.

Puygueraud is a blend of 70% merlot, 25% cabernet franc and 5% malbec which is aged for 16 months in oak, 40% of which is new. It is a wine of great depth, flavour and character at a modest price.

The estate also produces another wine, Cuvée George, as a tribute to George Thienpont. He was always a champion of malbec-cabernet blends, and so – very unusually for this region – Cuvée George always contains 35% each of malbec and cabernet franc.

Bordeaux Vintage 2007

2007 is a claret vintage for wine drinkers rather than wine investors and is an outstanding vintage for dry and sweet whites. There are some disappointing red wines but there are many fine wines of elegance and charm that are already giving pure uncomplicated pleasure. Tannins are gentle and mild, and the acidity levels are generally low making the wines rounded and easy to enjoy. They are mostly ready and good to drink now, though some of the great names may need more time.

Undoubtedly, in a year when there was not enough summer sunshine for a ‘great’ vintage, 2007 succeeded best in the most favoured vineyards of Bordeaux. The outstanding châteaux were rigorous in coaxing the best from their vines with pruning and crop thinning, and then selection in the cellar.

The year got off to a good start with a brilliant April, but then most of the summer was cool and disappointing and the vintage was saved by three beautiful weeks in September. It was no accident that our list was dominated...
2007 is a claret vintage for wine drinkers rather than wine investors and is an outstanding vintage for dry and sweet whites. There are some disappointing red wines but there are many fine wines of elegance and charm that are already giving pure uncomplicated pleasure. Tannins are gentle and mild, and the acidity levels are generally low making the wines rounded and easy to enjoy. They are mostly ready and good to drink now, though some of the great names may need more time.

Undoubtedly, in a year when there was not enough summer sunshine for a ‘great’ vintage, 2007 succeeded best in the most favoured vineyards of Bordeaux. The outstanding châteaux were rigorous in coaxing the best from their vines with pruning and crop thinning, and then selection in the cellar.

The year got off to a good start with a brilliant April, but then most of the summer was cool and disappointing and the vintage was saved by three beautiful weeks in September. It was no accident that our list was dominated by the great vineyards of Saint-Julien, Pauillac, Margaux, the gravel plateau of Pomerol and the heart of Pessac-Léognan, where the best exposure to sunshine and excellent drainage go hand in hand.

The conditions that made life tricky for claret proved ideal for white wines, whose delicate aromas are blunted by too much sun, and for the great Sauternes and Barsacs, which enjoyed exceptional conditions in the autumn. Sauternes and Barsacs are a huge success in 2007, comparable to 2001. Dry white wines from the best estates will benefit from ageing.
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2007 vintage reviews

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