Domaine Antoine et François Jobard Meursault en la Barre 2014 is no longer available

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Domaine Antoine et François Jobard Meursault en la Barre 2014

White Wine from France - Burgundy
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The outstanding 2014 white Burgundies are beginning to hit their stride now. The Jobard house style - firm, with good tension and grip - is evident here.
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Code: BU62331

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • 2 - Dry
  • Chardonnay
  • 75cl
  • Drinking now
  • 13% Alcohol
  • oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Cork, natural

Côte de Beaune

The Côte de Beaune runs from Ladoix-Serrigny in the north to Cheilly lè Maranges in the south, on the southern escarpment of the Côte d’Or. Beaune is the town at its heart. The most famous wines of the area are white, but many excellent reds are produced.

The soils of the area are predominantly mixtures of clay and limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The hillsides here, split and riven by streams and side-valleys, provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as various aspects ranging from east-facing to south and south-west facing. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle. Soils with more limestone suit chardonnay more than pinot, hence the number of famous white burgundies produced...
The Côte de Beaune runs from Ladoix-Serrigny in the north to Cheilly lè Maranges in the south, on the southern escarpment of the Côte d’Or. Beaune is the town at its heart. The most famous wines of the area are white, but many excellent reds are produced.

The soils of the area are predominantly mixtures of clay and limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The hillsides here, split and riven by streams and side-valleys, provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as various aspects ranging from east-facing to south and south-west facing. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle. Soils with more limestone suit chardonnay more than pinot, hence the number of famous white burgundies produced here.

The climate here is semi-continental, though northerly winds can temper a hot summer while warmer winds from the south can bring warmth. Westerly winds that ultimately originate in the Atlantic can bring rain but at its worst may deliver devastating hail in incredibly localised storms. There is a degree of unpredictability about vintages in Burgundy.

Pinot noir and chardonnay are the two permitted grapes of any significance, though Aligoté is grown occasionally for crisp, mouth-watering whites that are often used to make kir, and some generic Bourgogne or Crémant can be made with pinot blanc, pinot gris and beurrot can be made.

The appellations to be found in the Côte de Beaune are as follows: Ladoix, Pernand-Vergelesses, Aloxe-Corton , Corton, Corton-Charlemagne, Chorey-lès-Beaune, Savigny-lès Beaune, Beaune, Pommard, Volnay, Monthélie, Auxey-Duresses, Saint-Romain, Meursault, Saint-Aubin, Puligny-Montrachet, Chassagne-Montrachet, Santenay and Maranges

Côte de Beaune-Villages and Bourgogne-Hautes Côtes de Beaune are also made. The former is solely for red wines and the latter includes some whites as well. Both are mostly from vineyards on the top of the escarpment and some represent good value for early drinking Burgundy.

Côte de Beaune wines are generally lighter than those from the Côte de Nuits. Beaunes are soft and round, Volnays fine and silky. Pommards are the exception: due to more clay in the soil, they can be notably tannic and in need of considerable bottle age. The greatest of all white Burgundies, Le Montrachet, is made here between Chassagne and Puligny.
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Burgundy Vintage 2014

2014 White Burgundy is the best white vintage I have tasted since I began tasting from barrel with the 1995 vintage. It is ripe and concentrated but doesn’t taste heavy. Virtually everything is good from Chablis to the Mâconnais. It will be delicious young and old. We suggest you buy all you can of this year.

The red wine scenario is a little more complicated. The Côte de Nuits has produced a delicious crop of ripe and friendly wines with soft tannins. After a serious of low yielding vintages, the vines had something in reserve and yields were a little high for great quality. They are better than the 2011s but do not appear to be as good as the 2012s or 2013s.

The Côte de Beaune again got hailed, this year on the 28 June which affected about 3000 ha of vineyards destroying between 10 and 90% of the crop. Volnay, Pommard, Beaune, Savigny and Corton all got hit by the storm. These one has to judge wine by wine. Where the vines lost more crop than leaves the grapes concentrated and made...
2014 White Burgundy is the best white vintage I have tasted since I began tasting from barrel with the 1995 vintage. It is ripe and concentrated but doesn’t taste heavy. Virtually everything is good from Chablis to the Mâconnais. It will be delicious young and old. We suggest you buy all you can of this year.

The red wine scenario is a little more complicated. The Côte de Nuits has produced a delicious crop of ripe and friendly wines with soft tannins. After a serious of low yielding vintages, the vines had something in reserve and yields were a little high for great quality. They are better than the 2011s but do not appear to be as good as the 2012s or 2013s.

The Côte de Beaune again got hailed, this year on the 28 June which affected about 3000 ha of vineyards destroying between 10 and 90% of the crop. Volnay, Pommard, Beaune, Savigny and Corton all got hit by the storm. These one has to judge wine by wine. Where the vines lost more crop than leaves the grapes concentrated and made ripe and rich wines. In the opposite scenario the wines can be a little tough. Between these two poles there are a multitude of styles.
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