Domaine Jean-Noël Gagnard, Chassagne-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Chaumées 2018 is no longer available

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Domaine Jean-Noël Gagnard, Chassagne-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Chaumées 2018

White Wine from France - Burgundy
5.000000000 star rating 1 Reviews
From the southernmost commune of the Côte d’Or, and a top name hereabouts, now in the hands of Jean-Noël’s daughter Caroline, a white Burgundy with a fine aromatic, floral nose and a firm and taut palate which finishes fresh.
is no longer available
Code: BU74151

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • 2 - Dry
  • Chardonnay
  • 75cl
  • Drinking now
  • 13.5% Alcohol
  • oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Cork, natural

Côte de Beaune

The Côte de Beaune runs from Ladoix-Serrigny in the north to Cheilly lè Maranges in the south, on the southern escarpment of the Côte d’Or. Beaune is the town at its heart. The most famous wines of the area are white, but many excellent reds are produced.

The soils of the area are predominantly mixtures of clay and limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The hillsides here, split and riven by streams and side-valleys, provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as various aspects ranging from east-facing to south and south-west facing. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle. Soils with more limestone suit chardonnay more than pinot, hence the number of famous white burgundies produced...
The Côte de Beaune runs from Ladoix-Serrigny in the north to Cheilly lè Maranges in the south, on the southern escarpment of the Côte d’Or. Beaune is the town at its heart. The most famous wines of the area are white, but many excellent reds are produced.

The soils of the area are predominantly mixtures of clay and limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The hillsides here, split and riven by streams and side-valleys, provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as various aspects ranging from east-facing to south and south-west facing. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle. Soils with more limestone suit chardonnay more than pinot, hence the number of famous white burgundies produced here.

The climate here is semi-continental, though northerly winds can temper a hot summer while warmer winds from the south can bring warmth. Westerly winds that ultimately originate in the Atlantic can bring rain but at its worst may deliver devastating hail in incredibly localised storms. There is a degree of unpredictability about vintages in Burgundy.

Pinot noir and chardonnay are the two permitted grapes of any significance, though Aligoté is grown occasionally for crisp, mouth-watering whites that are often used to make kir, and some generic Bourgogne or Crémant can be made with pinot blanc, pinot gris and beurrot can be made.

The appellations to be found in the Côte de Beaune are as follows: Ladoix, Pernand-Vergelesses, Aloxe-Corton , Corton, Corton-Charlemagne, Chorey-lès-Beaune, Savigny-lès Beaune, Beaune, Pommard, Volnay, Monthélie, Auxey-Duresses, Saint-Romain, Meursault, Saint-Aubin, Puligny-Montrachet, Chassagne-Montrachet, Santenay and Maranges

Côte de Beaune-Villages and Bourgogne-Hautes Côtes de Beaune are also made. The former is solely for red wines and the latter includes some whites as well. Both are mostly from vineyards on the top of the escarpment and some represent good value for early drinking Burgundy.

Côte de Beaune wines are generally lighter than those from the Côte de Nuits. Beaunes are soft and round, Volnays fine and silky. Pommards are the exception: due to more clay in the soil, they can be notably tannic and in need of considerable bottle age. The greatest of all white Burgundies, Le Montrachet, is made here between Chassagne and Puligny.
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Domaine Jean-Noel Gagnard

Since 1989 Jean-Noël Gagnard’s only child, Caroline Lestimé has been making the wines at this top estate in Chassagne-Montrachet. She has had to fight hard to earn her place as a female winemaker in what is still a male-dominated world but greatly enjoys the challenge. Caroline has continued the traditions her father implemented while making some significant adjustments along the way. No chemical fertilisers or herbicides are now used in accordance with Caroline’s utmost respect for the environment and her determination to create a modern, dynamic domaine based on these principles. Bâtonnage is regular but depends on the vintage and style of wines. There are no fewer than nine distinct white premiers crus including Les Caillerets, one of Chassagne’s greatest, which has marvellous fruit purity, beautiful balance and needs time to reveal its full glory. While Jean-Noël still occasionally pops his head into the cellar to see what is going on, recent vintages show this is an estate that is doing very well indeed with his daughter at the helm, consistently producing wines of great richness and finesse.

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