Domaine William Fèvre, Chablis Grand Cru Bougros 2016 is no longer available

This is a carousel with zoom. Use the thumbnails to navigate, or jump to a slide. Use the zoom button to zoom into a image.

Out of stock

Domaine William Fèvre, Chablis Grand Cru Bougros 2016

White Wine from France - Burgundy
Although not the best-known Chablis cru, this really is a great success: a 50% barrel-fermented wine with attractive white-peach aromas and hallmark grand cru structure and weight on the palate. We encourage you to try it!
is no longer available
Code: BU67691

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • Dry
  • Chardonnay
  • 13% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Now to 2026
  • 75cl
  • Cork, diam

Chablis

Though it is nominally a region of Burgundy there are several factors that make Chablis a quite distinct wine style from its southerly neighbours. The first is distance, the vineyards here being more than sixty miles north of Beaune and separated from the rest of Burgundy by the Morvan Hills. The second is the soil which defines the amphitheatre of hills upon which the best sites lie. The Kimmeridgian clay, which the French call argilo-calcaire, is packed with marine fossils, which in this area sits atop limestone. Finally, and crucially, the climate is considered semi-continental, with no real maritime influence, and where winters are hard and very cold and summers generally hot. One of the biggest risks facing Chablis growers is frost which is a regular and damaging visitor. It is one of the key factors in determining how much wine will be made in any given vintage and most growers go to extraordinary lengths to protect their vines every spring, including heaters among the vines and ...
Though it is nominally a region of Burgundy there are several factors that make Chablis a quite distinct wine style from its southerly neighbours. The first is distance, the vineyards here being more than sixty miles north of Beaune and separated from the rest of Burgundy by the Morvan Hills. The second is the soil which defines the amphitheatre of hills upon which the best sites lie. The Kimmeridgian clay, which the French call argilo-calcaire, is packed with marine fossils, which in this area sits atop limestone. Finally, and crucially, the climate is considered semi-continental, with no real maritime influence, and where winters are hard and very cold and summers generally hot. One of the biggest risks facing Chablis growers is frost which is a regular and damaging visitor. It is one of the key factors in determining how much wine will be made in any given vintage and most growers go to extraordinary lengths to protect their vines every spring, including heaters among the vines and a spray system that coats the buds with water. The measures taken have meant that life for a Chablis vigneron is not quite the lottery it used to be, though there is much vintage variation still.

Chardonnay is the only permitted variety, though there are two schools of thought on how to treat it in the winemaking. Some seek the purest expression of the terroir and the fruit, emphasising the steely, mineral qualities, while others believe that a dash of oak after fermentation can add layers of flavour and complexity to the wine. Most producers eschew oak, and those that do use new barrels rarely use it without restraint.

As with the rest of Burgundy, a hierarchy exists to demarcate the best vineyards. Seven Grand Cru vineyards have been registered, all on the south-west facing slopes of the valley of the Serein river. Below this level are 40 Premiers Cru sites. The area that is permitted to produce Chablis AC and some Premiers Crus has expanded in recent decades, as frost damage has been contained, and this has caused some controversy despite arguments that the land newly planted was once Premiers Cru before phylloxera constricted the land under vine.

The local cooperative makes about a third of all Chablis, though more and more growers who were once committed to the co-op are now making wine for themselves, which has also led to a concomitant reduction in the number négociants.
Read more

Domaine William Fèvre

One of the great Chablis domaines, Fèvre commands 12 hectares of premier cru vineyardsand 16 hectares of grand cru sites. It was founded by the eponymous William Fèvre, who built it up from just 7 hectares in 1957 to 47 hectares including smart plantings in great sites which had previously been neglected. William Fèvre was the most vocal of campaigners for the Chablis appellation, staunchly opposing the extension of its boundaries and fighting against the use of the word ‘Chablis’ to describe any wine which did not come from the region itself. This was a particular problem in the United States, where the term had been hijacked to enhance the appeal of any dry white wine. Fèvre was also one of the first to ferment and raise his wines in new oak, which significantly polarised opinion on them.

In 1998 Fèvre retired to pursue other ventures, notably in Chile. He sold the business to Champagne Henriot, which also owns the prominent Burgundy producer Bouchard Père et Fils. Since the takeover, the oak influence has been reduced drastically and the domaine has thrived, successfully combining quality and quantity.

The winemaker is the experienced and talented Didier Séguier who had previously worked for the Bouchard winemaking team in Beaune. Under his direction, all the domaine’s fruit is hand-harvested and selection is rigorous. Most complex and complete of the wines is the grand cruLes Clos which comes from 4 hectares of old vines in the top part of the vineyard. At the other...
One of the great Chablis domaines, Fèvre commands 12 hectares of premier cru vineyardsand 16 hectares of grand cru sites. It was founded by the eponymous William Fèvre, who built it up from just 7 hectares in 1957 to 47 hectares including smart plantings in great sites which had previously been neglected. William Fèvre was the most vocal of campaigners for the Chablis appellation, staunchly opposing the extension of its boundaries and fighting against the use of the word ‘Chablis’ to describe any wine which did not come from the region itself. This was a particular problem in the United States, where the term had been hijacked to enhance the appeal of any dry white wine. Fèvre was also one of the first to ferment and raise his wines in new oak, which significantly polarised opinion on them.

In 1998 Fèvre retired to pursue other ventures, notably in Chile. He sold the business to Champagne Henriot, which also owns the prominent Burgundy producer Bouchard Père et Fils. Since the takeover, the oak influence has been reduced drastically and the domaine has thrived, successfully combining quality and quantity.

The winemaker is the experienced and talented Didier Séguier who had previously worked for the Bouchard winemaking team in Beaune. Under his direction, all the domaine’s fruit is hand-harvested and selection is rigorous. Most complex and complete of the wines is the grand cruLes Clos which comes from 4 hectares of old vines in the top part of the vineyard. At the other end of the scale, Fèvre’s AC Chablisis full-bodied and creamy in style without losing the trademark minerality of the appellation.
Read more

Burgundy Vintage 2016

It is difficult to compare this special vintage with previous ones: the wines have the aromas of a cool year and the palates of a ripe one. Normally, wines with ripe palates will have less intense aromas, while aromatic wines can have excessive acidity or scratchy tannins. In 2016, we have all the benefits and none of the disadvantages. The only big problem is quantity: 2016 produced roughly half a normal crop due to a severe frost. What has been made, however, is exceptional.

Reds are pure, intense and exquisite, especially in the Côte d’Or, which had the best weather. Combine this with deep colour, ripe fruit, sweet tannins and a fresh finish, and one has something very rare. The ripe character and the quality of the tannins are remarkable.

There is some inconsistency in style – the frost damage is very variable, so that leads to great differences in yield and therefore ripeness – but quality is uniformly high, with medium to long-term ageing potential. An exceptional year.

The whites ...
It is difficult to compare this special vintage with previous ones: the wines have the aromas of a cool year and the palates of a ripe one. Normally, wines with ripe palates will have less intense aromas, while aromatic wines can have excessive acidity or scratchy tannins. In 2016, we have all the benefits and none of the disadvantages. The only big problem is quantity: 2016 produced roughly half a normal crop due to a severe frost. What has been made, however, is exceptional.

Reds are pure, intense and exquisite, especially in the Côte d’Or, which had the best weather. Combine this with deep colour, ripe fruit, sweet tannins and a fresh finish, and one has something very rare. The ripe character and the quality of the tannins are remarkable.

There is some inconsistency in style – the frost damage is very variable, so that leads to great differences in yield and therefore ripeness – but quality is uniformly high, with medium to long-term ageing potential. An exceptional year.

The whites have a similar blend of freshness and ripeness – traits that are usually diametrically opposed. To find them in the same wines is very unusual.

There is a little more variation in style and quality than for the reds. The Côte d’Or was the warmest region, while Chablis was distinctly cooler, with a rainy September, making bright, tense and classic wines. The Mâconnais, spared the frost, was successful too, but 1,500ha were damaged by hail in the south of the region.
Read more
2016 vintage reviews

Recommended for you

Back to top