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Fleurie Origines, Domaine Grégoire Hoppenot 2020

Red Wine from France - Beaujolais
3.000000000 star rating 2 Reviews
An appealingly floral wine from well-located vines in the heart of Fleurie. In 2021, Grégoire Hoppenot was voted France's newcomer of the year by the influential Revue du Vin de France and this wine offers bags of pleasure for drinking now and over the next two to three years.
Out of stock
Code: BJ9091

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Medium-bodied
  • Gamay
  • 75cl
  • Now to 2023
  • 13% Alcohol
  • no oak influence
  • Cork, natural

Grégoire Hoppenot

Having spent some time on the senior team at renowned Beaujolais négociants Trenel, Grégoire Hoppenot has now stepped into the spotlight with his own excellent domaine at Les Roches in Fleurie, with his debut vintage coming in 2018. After years traversing the Beaujolais region in his previous role it was time to find his feet in his own vineyards, getting a real sense of place and expressing it in the wines that he makes. He says that his job is to convey the purest expression of a wine’s origin, its terroir, and the vintage and he works hard among the vines to achieve that.

His domaine embraces two slopes with very different characteristics, and between those slopes there is much diversity too, variations in geology, aspects and exposures, and altitudes. He has five distinct ‘climats’ across the two slopes, where he farms on organic lines (he is converting but has yet to be certified). Les Garants is truly typical of Fleurie, poor granite soils with quartz quite visible, overlooking the village itself with a south-south-west aspect and densely planted vines that can be up to 60 years old. At Les Moriers, just under a kilometre shy of Moulin-à-Vent, just under three hectares are granite too, but with a sandy element that deepens as the slope descends from 340 metres, and the vines look north-east. Here the vines can be up to 90 years old. Clos de l'Amandier is a monopole of the estate, in the south-eastern part of Poncié, one of the finest of Fleurie climats. Its steep...
Having spent some time on the senior team at renowned Beaujolais négociants Trenel, Grégoire Hoppenot has now stepped into the spotlight with his own excellent domaine at Les Roches in Fleurie, with his debut vintage coming in 2018. After years traversing the Beaujolais region in his previous role it was time to find his feet in his own vineyards, getting a real sense of place and expressing it in the wines that he makes. He says that his job is to convey the purest expression of a wine’s origin, its terroir, and the vintage and he works hard among the vines to achieve that.

His domaine embraces two slopes with very different characteristics, and between those slopes there is much diversity too, variations in geology, aspects and exposures, and altitudes. He has five distinct ‘climats’ across the two slopes, where he farms on organic lines (he is converting but has yet to be certified). Les Garants is truly typical of Fleurie, poor granite soils with quartz quite visible, overlooking the village itself with a south-south-west aspect and densely planted vines that can be up to 60 years old. At Les Moriers, just under a kilometre shy of Moulin-à-Vent, just under three hectares are granite too, but with a sandy element that deepens as the slope descends from 340 metres, and the vines look north-east. Here the vines can be up to 90 years old. Clos de l'Amandier is a monopole of the estate, in the south-eastern part of Poncié, one of the finest of Fleurie climats. Its steep slopes face south to south-west, soaking up the sun all day. Corcelette is a virtual wall of stony soil, its granite soils very shallow to the point that the bedrock breaks through in places, as if it weren’t hard enough to farm. And, last but not least, his vines at Les Roches itself are up to 50 years old, planted in nutrient poor, shallow granite and sand dominated soils spread over a plateau between 260 and 330 metres above sea level.

Harvesting at all the sites is manual, for very practical reasons as well as for reasons of quality. Yields are, as one might expect for such an assiduous vigneron, low for the region. Grapes are fermented in whole clusters employing only indigenous yeasts, with maceration times varying with each site and in each vintage, depending on the conditions. Extractions are gentle with the cap of skins kept submerged during fermentation, and temperatures kept below 30°C. Once the fermentation is complete, the wines are matured in a variety of casks and barrels plus some concrete vats, with times varying depending on the site and vintage. Clos de l’Amandier, Les Moriers and Corcelette are bottled under their own name, with two blends, Indigène and Origines pulling together the fruit from Les Roches and Les Garants.
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The Observer

Another fine source of chillable, crunchy, sappy red wines for cooling off on summer evenings is the Beaujolais region north of Lyon. Those from the Fleurie appellation within Beaujolais generally have a...
Another fine source of chillable, crunchy, sappy red wines for cooling off on summer evenings is the Beaujolais region north of Lyon. Those from the Fleurie appellation within Beaujolais generally have a kind of floral prettiness that is suggested by, but coincidental to, the name: the slinky, finely succulent Fleurie Origines from rising-star winemaker Grégoire Hoppenot certainly has that violet-like dimension.
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David Williams

JancisRobinson.com

Transparent garnet. Correct, lovely, approachable cru Beaujolais with real grip and no shortage of fruit. Absolute bullseye of a wine with everything in its place. Long too. Definitely under-priced. Very...
Transparent garnet. Correct, lovely, approachable cru Beaujolais with real grip and no shortage of fruit. Absolute bullseye of a wine with everything in its place. Long too. Definitely under-priced. Very good value. 16.5/20
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Jancis Robinson

JancisRobinson.com

Wine of the Week: What could be more perfect on an early summer evening than a perfect cru Beaujolais made for relatively early drinking. Ladies and gentlemen, I offer you perfection in this wine. I...
Wine of the Week: What could be more perfect on an early summer evening than a perfect cru Beaujolais made for relatively early drinking. Ladies and gentlemen, I offer you perfection in this wine. I marked it VGV for very good value (I know you can find Fleuries cheaper than this but surely not one as perfect as this). I gave it 16.5/20 and suggested a drinking window of 2021–2025. That grip suggests it will last well, but it’s clearly not one of those crus Beaujolais made to be drunk only after quite a few years in bottle (which to my mind are less useful than this silky, fruity specimen).
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Jancis Robinson

wine-pages.com

Cru Beaujolais made with whole-bunch fermentation and aged in cement tanks, this is fresh, and delicately cherry and floral scented. Loads of juicy, light- to medium-bodied fruit, like biting into a ripe...
Cru Beaujolais made with whole-bunch fermentation and aged in cement tanks, this is fresh, and delicately cherry and floral scented. Loads of juicy, light- to medium-bodied fruit, like biting into a ripe plum crossed with a peach, plenty of sparky acidity and enough tannin to deliver a lovely mouthful of wine. 89/100
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Tom Cannavan

2020 vintage reviews
2019 vintage reviews

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