Pinot Noir, Ostoros 2016 is no longer available

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Pinot Noir, Ostoros 2016

Red Wine from Hungary
Excellent pinot noir at a daringly low price. What a find! Pinot noir grown in Hungary is often blended away, but this gem is packed with juicy red-fruit flavours and refreshing acidity, offering simply world-class value. Especially good served lightly chilled.
is no longer available
Code: HU1301

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Light to medium-bodied
  • Pinot Noir
  • 13.5% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Screwcap

Hungary

The Romans cultivated vines in Pannonia from the second century AD and despite a period of Ottoman Muslim rule in parts of Hungary during the 16th and 17th centuries and the dead hand of state control in the second half of the 20th Hungary has adapted well to the demands of a modern free market, and particularly an export driven one. Since the fall of communism in the late 1980s the Hungarian wine industry has garnered foreign and local investment and adopted modern technological and viticultural practises to improve the quality of the wines.

The principal wine growing regions sit between 45o and 50o latitude, similar to Burgundy to the west. The continental climate of landlocked Hungary is one of extremely cold winters and long, hot summers followed by prolonged, usually sunny autumns. Lake Balaton, Europe’s largest lake, provides a moderating effect on winter and summer temperatures, as does the Tisza River that glides past the Tokaji region, the Neusiedlersee that the border...
The Romans cultivated vines in Pannonia from the second century AD and despite a period of Ottoman Muslim rule in parts of Hungary during the 16th and 17th centuries and the dead hand of state control in the second half of the 20th Hungary has adapted well to the demands of a modern free market, and particularly an export driven one. Since the fall of communism in the late 1980s the Hungarian wine industry has garnered foreign and local investment and adopted modern technological and viticultural practises to improve the quality of the wines.

The principal wine growing regions sit between 45o and 50o latitude, similar to Burgundy to the west. The continental climate of landlocked Hungary is one of extremely cold winters and long, hot summers followed by prolonged, usually sunny autumns. Lake Balaton, Europe’s largest lake, provides a moderating effect on winter and summer temperatures, as does the Tisza River that glides past the Tokaji region, the Neusiedlersee that the border region of Sopron shares with Austria, and the Danube for the winemaking areas of the north such as Transdanubia.
The vineyards are spread all over the country so soil types are not homogenous over such a large area, but one common theme is the volcanic nature of many. The Great Plain area where much of Hungary’s more generic offerings originate is mostly sand and loess.

Tokaji is Hungary’s most famous wine. Recent investment has paid dividends in re-establishing a reputation for greatness that was forged in medieval times and diluted during Communist rule when all wines were exported through a monopoly little interested in providing quality and these great sweet wines might even be pasteurised. The confluence of the river Tisza and a smaller, cooler tributary provides the conditions for the creation of the ‘Breath of God’, or morning mists, in the same way the merging of the Cerons and the Gironde do in Sauternes. This in turn encourages the formation of botrytis cinerea, a fungus that feeds on the moisture in a grape, concentrating the sugars and changing its structure. The result is some of the best and most luscious sweet wines in the world, made from the indigenous furmint, harslevelu, oremus or zeta, and koverszolo varieties, together with muscat.

In the south-west, on the border with Croatia, the Villány-Siklós region is fast developing a reputation for excellent wines, and in the north-east is the Eger region, modern home to the famous and sturdy Bull’s Blood, arguably Hungary’s second most famous wine though not necessarily the origin of the widely exported brand of the last century.

Although many international varieties such as cabernet sauvignon and franc, pinot noir, chardonnay and sauvignon blanc have been planted and are making excellent wines, the Hungarians have retained many native central European vines. Kadarka, kekfrankos (aka blaufränkisch), irsai oliver and the aforementioned furmint and harslevelu have a long history and can make characterful wines.
The Hungarian authorities have developed an appellation system modelled on the French and Austrian versions and 22 regions are currently recognised.
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2016 vintage reviews

Yorkshire Post

From the Eger regionof Hungary this is a light, fresh cherry and strawberry-filled pinot. It goeswell with charcuterie, pâtés and simple pasta dishes.

- Christine Austin

JancisRobinson.com

Pale ruby. Amazinglyinexpensive for a Hungarian wine! Smells of Pannonian-warmed Pinot. Certainlynot burgundy and fully mature. Very slightly syrupy but there is no flab. Whata steal! Polished and sweet...
Pale ruby. Amazinglyinexpensive for a Hungarian wine! Smells of Pannonian-warmed Pinot. Certainlynot burgundy and fully mature. Very slightly syrupy but there is no flab. Whata steal! Polished and sweet but still refreshing. Very good value.
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16/20

Olive

Pinot noir is aclassically good match with turkey andsits happily alongside many other things too – it’sgreat for a Boxing Day cold cuts buffet, or whenyou’re catering for picky eaters...
Pinot noir is aclassically good match with turkey andsits happily alongside many other things too – it’sgreat for a Boxing Day cold cuts buffet, or whenyou’re catering for picky eaters with different tastes.[This wine]  is astonishing value at £6.75 ... would be good servedslightly chilled to freshen jaded palates.
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- Kate Hawkings

The Observer

Pinot noir’s elusiveforest floor earthiness and juicy red berry fruits are both in evidence in asmart Hungarian bargain that is a good-value choice for those who favour alighter red with the turkey...
Pinot noir’s elusiveforest floor earthiness and juicy red berry fruits are both in evidence in asmart Hungarian bargain that is a good-value choice for those who favour alighter red with the turkey and trimmings.
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- David Williams

The Daily Telegraph

New to The WineSociety, this Hungarian pinot noir is all bright redcurrants, red cherries andcool lines – seriously impressive at the price, and a joy to drink slightlychilled.

- Victoria Moore

JancisRobinson.com

Delightfullyinexpensive wine that really does taste (a bit) like Pinot. Spicy and only veryslightly syrupy.

- Jancis Robinson

joannasimon.com

Astonishing to findsomething that tastes of pinot noir at this price – light and soft texturedwith fresh, sweet berry fruit and pinot's delicate stemmy earthiness. Hats offto the Society's...
Astonishing to findsomething that tastes of pinot noir at this price – light and soft texturedwith fresh, sweet berry fruit and pinot's delicate stemmy earthiness. Hats offto the Society's Eastern Europe buyer.
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- Joanna Simon

Reader's Digest

British lamb roastsare often accompanied by a big red, but pick something lighter for … lambsalad. [This wine] has fruity cherry and redcurrant notes which work reallywell …

Rachel Walker

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