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Relais de Durfort-Vivens, Margaux 2016

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The second wine of classed growth Durfort-Vivens this has deep-purple colour and a scented nose of redcurrants, blueberries and violets. A smooth and highly satisfying Margaux with a sense of place and made using biodynamic practices. 69% cabernet sauvignon, 20% merlot and 1% cabernet franc. This vineyard has been at the cutting edge of good sustainability practice. For example, Durfort-Vivens has been trialling the use of mulch (pruned cane cuttings or sarments, tree bark) between vine rows to help maintain humidity, lower soil temperature and assist with the steady maturation of the grapes.
Price: £33.00 Bottle
Price: £198.00 Case of 6
In Stock
Code: CM27901

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Medium-bodied
  • Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 75cl
  • Now to 2029
  • 13.5% Alcohol
  • oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Cork, natural

Château Durfort-Vivens

Durfort-Vivens is one of the châteaux very successfully owed and run by the Lurton family. In this case, Gonzague, who works alongside his wife, Claire Villars.

History
This second growth Margaux property was greatly esteemed long before the 1855 Classification: it had many fans as early as the 18th century, and Thomas Jefferson – who was minister to France before his US Presidency, and a great wine lover – ranked Durfort-Vivens directly after Latour, Lafite and Margaux. The talented Lucien Lurton bought the property in 1961 and worked hard to restore it to its fullest potential and, since 1992, his son Gonzague has continued his good work.

The wines
The 55 hectares of vines lie on hills of deep, particularly poor gravel which produces early-ripening cabernet sauvignon typical of many great Margaux wines. Grapes are hand picked, and once they reach the winery they are subject to constant tasting and evaluation to determine how to proceed with each stage of the vinification.

Durfort-Vivens is an unusual and original Margaux, which is seldom charming when young, and always needs time in bottle to show the finesse and length of flavour that Gonzague seeks. In lighter years it can remain quite austere, although it always has true Margaux fragrance, but in better years it has real length, flavour and class.

The wine tends to be a blend of 70% cabernet sauvignon, 24% merlot and 6% cabernet franc, aged for between 16 and 20 months in oak, up to 40% of which is new...

Durfort-Vivens is one of the châteaux very successfully owed and run by the Lurton family. In this case, Gonzague, who works alongside his wife, Claire Villars.

History
This second growth Margaux property was greatly esteemed long before the 1855 Classification: it had many fans as early as the 18th century, and Thomas Jefferson – who was minister to France before his US Presidency, and a great wine lover – ranked Durfort-Vivens directly after Latour, Lafite and Margaux. The talented Lucien Lurton bought the property in 1961 and worked hard to restore it to its fullest potential and, since 1992, his son Gonzague has continued his good work.

The wines
The 55 hectares of vines lie on hills of deep, particularly poor gravel which produces early-ripening cabernet sauvignon typical of many great Margaux wines. Grapes are hand picked, and once they reach the winery they are subject to constant tasting and evaluation to determine how to proceed with each stage of the vinification.

Durfort-Vivens is an unusual and original Margaux, which is seldom charming when young, and always needs time in bottle to show the finesse and length of flavour that Gonzague seeks. In lighter years it can remain quite austere, although it always has true Margaux fragrance, but in better years it has real length, flavour and class.

The wine tends to be a blend of 70% cabernet sauvignon, 24% merlot and 6% cabernet franc, aged for between 16 and 20 months in oak, up to 40% of which is new oak. It will keep for between 11 and 25 years

Environmental sustainability
The estate has been dedicated to sustainable farming, having started its transition to organic farming in 2013 and certified biodynamic (Demeter) in 2016. ‘Biodynamics is a question of observation and then a pragmatic approach to problem solving,’ explains technical director Léopold Valentin. Aside from being certified organic and biodynamic, the property has also been HVE (High Environmental Value) and EMS (Environmental Management System) certified since 2019. All Durfort-Vivens wines have also been tested for ‘zero residue’ since 2014.

Apart from regular biodynamic practices, much time and attention has been given to the importance of cover crops and their use in maintaining a living soil. A mix of lupins, cereal crops and pulses have been sown to feed the soil, improve rooting and aeration, and avoid erosion. There’s also the added advantage that this process means that carbon (essential for photosynthesis) can be more readily sequestered from the atmosphere and stored in the soil.

Social sustainability
The Lurton's have 15 members of the family active in wine growing in Bordeaux and hugely value that heritage. Gonzague is a former President of the Margaux producers’ group. 

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