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The Society's French Dry White 2021

White Wine from France - Languedoc - Roussillon
3.833330000 star rating 6 Reviews
Frosts devastated much of the Languedoc in spring so a big change was needed to create the fragrant, fruity and dry 2021 which, if anything, is better than the 2020. Vermentino becomes the major element with an important addition of very fine chardonnay. A final third is made up by sauvignon, grenache and viognier.
Price: £7.50 Bottle
Price: £90.00 Case of 12
In Stock
Code: FC41971

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • 1 - Bone dry
  • Vermentino
  • 75cl
  • Drinking now
  • 12.5% Alcohol
  • no oak influence
  • Screwcap

  • 100ml of this wine contains 77 kcal
  • The bottle contains 9.4 units of alcohol
  • A 125ml glass of this wine contains 96 kcal and 1.6 units of alcohol


The UK Chief Medical Officers recommend adults do not regularly drink more than 14 units per week. For information and support on responsible drinking please see www.drinkaware.co.uk. For more information about how calories in wine are measured, click here.

Domaine du Bosc

Situated in the Hérault department in southern France’s Languedoc region, Domaine du Bosc is not far from the beautiful seaside resort Cap d’Agde. It is a winemaking region steeped in history: Agde has actually been home to vines since the 5th century BC. This long winemaking history has been attributed to Agde’s port, which meant that, unlike those in many areas of France, growers were able to export their wines to various Mediterranean countries from very early on.

Their proximity to the sea provides the vines with a wonderful Mediterranean climate, with hot, dry summers and mild, sometimes wet autumns and winters. This part of the Languedoc sits on ancient lava flows that are very positive for the wines, allowing them to retain a good deal of freshness.

The Besinet family were vine growers for many generations, originally owning vineyards in Montpellier. Pierre Besinet had trained as a chemical engineer and for many years worked in the north of France, far away from any vines. He returned on the death of his father, but very quickly decided to sell up and start somewhere else.

Pierre became attracted to the volcanic soils around Agde and that is where he settled, creating Domaine du Bosc. At the time, the vineyard was planted with all manner of red grapes, and geared up for mass production; however, Pierre had the vision to start from scratch and planted other varieties. Starting with cabernet sauvignon and merlot, he was among the first to plant Bordeaux grapes, and then...
Situated in the Hérault department in southern France’s Languedoc region, Domaine du Bosc is not far from the beautiful seaside resort Cap d’Agde. It is a winemaking region steeped in history: Agde has actually been home to vines since the 5th century BC. This long winemaking history has been attributed to Agde’s port, which meant that, unlike those in many areas of France, growers were able to export their wines to various Mediterranean countries from very early on.

Their proximity to the sea provides the vines with a wonderful Mediterranean climate, with hot, dry summers and mild, sometimes wet autumns and winters. This part of the Languedoc sits on ancient lava flows that are very positive for the wines, allowing them to retain a good deal of freshness.

The Besinet family were vine growers for many generations, originally owning vineyards in Montpellier. Pierre Besinet had trained as a chemical engineer and for many years worked in the north of France, far away from any vines. He returned on the death of his father, but very quickly decided to sell up and start somewhere else.

Pierre became attracted to the volcanic soils around Agde and that is where he settled, creating Domaine du Bosc. At the time, the vineyard was planted with all manner of red grapes, and geared up for mass production; however, Pierre had the vision to start from scratch and planted other varieties. Starting with cabernet sauvignon and merlot, he was among the first to plant Bordeaux grapes, and then also planted grenache blanc. In time, he would add many more varieties, and to this day is still experimenting: recent additions have included petit verdot and petit manseng.

Pierre made his reputation on fresh, clean-tasting, fruity wines. His background helped him make some quite radical changes, especially in the cellar, which was one of the first in the Languedoc to be thermo-regulated. He was also one of the first to adopt night time harvesting, especially for white grapes as a way of preserving fruit flavours and freshness.

Today he is helped by winemaker Jean-Etienne Cros, a good friend of the Wine Society who used to manage his family’s estate in Gaillac. The day to day running of the business is in the hands of Pierre’s daughter Dominique – though Pierre now well into his 80’s, still looks in.
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2020 vintage reviews
2019 vintage reviews

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