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Tolpuddle Tasmanian Chardonnay 2013

White Wine from Australia - Tasmania
Shaw and Smith's Tasmanian venture, Tolpuddle, is a fine example of premium cool-climate chardonnay. Produced in tiny quantities, it has a focused and pure nose of green apple and lemon, its generous toasty oak complemented by concentrated citrus fruit on the palate.
is no longer available
Code: AU18631

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • Medium-bodied
  • Chardonnay
  • 12.5% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Screwcap

Tasmania

A place of beautiful landscapes, this quaint island is separated from mainland Australia by the 240km stretch of the Bass Strait, and is a wine lover's and fisherman's dream. Boasting some of the world's finest seafood, its temperate climate makes it Australia's coolest wine producing region. As would be expected, sparkling wine, riesling and chardonnay thrive in Tasmania, but pinot noir can be exceptional, with a delicacy and lift often lacking in wines from the mainland.

The vineyards are in the main part clustered close to the two major urban areas, the state capital Hobart in the south and Launceston in the north, though there are no geographical demarcations within the island and no matter where the grapes come from the wine is labelled ‘Tasmania’.

The west coast of Tasmania is one of the wettest parts of Australia, but the area around Hobart is one of its driest and all the commercial vineyards sit in the east. The Coal River, Huon Valley and Derwent Valley areas embrace Hobart...
A place of beautiful landscapes, this quaint island is separated from mainland Australia by the 240km stretch of the Bass Strait, and is a wine lover's and fisherman's dream. Boasting some of the world's finest seafood, its temperate climate makes it Australia's coolest wine producing region. As would be expected, sparkling wine, riesling and chardonnay thrive in Tasmania, but pinot noir can be exceptional, with a delicacy and lift often lacking in wines from the mainland.

The vineyards are in the main part clustered close to the two major urban areas, the state capital Hobart in the south and Launceston in the north, though there are no geographical demarcations within the island and no matter where the grapes come from the wine is labelled ‘Tasmania’.

The west coast of Tasmania is one of the wettest parts of Australia, but the area around Hobart is one of its driest and all the commercial vineyards sit in the east. The Coal River, Huon Valley and Derwent Valley areas embrace Hobart and are warmer and drier than other vineyard zones, and the Coal River sometimes requires irrigation. Around Launceston in the north the Tamar and Piper’s River areas are cooler, though Tamar is warmer than Piper’s Brook to the extent that it is not considered ideal for pinot noir plantings. The bottom line is that it is not easy to pigeonhole the larger areas of Tasmania and one is required to zoom in to examine districts and even vineyards. The geography and climate is complex and there are bound to be even more improvement as growers, especially those new to the island, get to grips with the variety of terroirs and the wonderful possibilities they offer.
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Shaw & Smith

Cousins Martin Shaw and Michael Hill-Smith decided to make wine together over a long lunch in 1989. Both had already established a fine reputation within the Australian wine industry: Martin worked with the legendary Brian Croser at Petaluma and consults around the globe, while Michael Hill-Smith was the first Australian to pass the rigorous Master of Wine exams in 1988 having grown up as part of the Yalumba clan in the Barossa.

They are based in the rolling Adelaide Hills, part of the Mount Lofty Ranges east of the city of Adelaide, where they own several vineyards in a wine region that is cooler than most in Australia. Up in these hills temperatures are lower on average than many areas of South Australia by about 4 degrees centigrade during the day and 8 degrees at night; music to a winemaker’s ears if trying to make wines of purity and balance.

That sauvignon blanc is one of the grape varieties upon which they have focused much of their attention amply illustrates the kind of wine they are seeking to make in these fresher climes and they have produced what many consider to be Australia’s finest example, leaner and less pungent than , say, Marlborough sauvignon. 'Martin would trade herbaceousness for palate length every day of the week’ said Michael in a Decanter interview a few years ago. Chardonnay, shiraz and pinot noir are the other varieties made in styles that seek to reflect the quality of their Adelaide Hills fruit, all elegance and poise, but without losing sight ...
Cousins Martin Shaw and Michael Hill-Smith decided to make wine together over a long lunch in 1989. Both had already established a fine reputation within the Australian wine industry: Martin worked with the legendary Brian Croser at Petaluma and consults around the globe, while Michael Hill-Smith was the first Australian to pass the rigorous Master of Wine exams in 1988 having grown up as part of the Yalumba clan in the Barossa.

They are based in the rolling Adelaide Hills, part of the Mount Lofty Ranges east of the city of Adelaide, where they own several vineyards in a wine region that is cooler than most in Australia. Up in these hills temperatures are lower on average than many areas of South Australia by about 4 degrees centigrade during the day and 8 degrees at night; music to a winemaker’s ears if trying to make wines of purity and balance.

That sauvignon blanc is one of the grape varieties upon which they have focused much of their attention amply illustrates the kind of wine they are seeking to make in these fresher climes and they have produced what many consider to be Australia’s finest example, leaner and less pungent than , say, Marlborough sauvignon. 'Martin would trade herbaceousness for palate length every day of the week’ said Michael in a Decanter interview a few years ago. Chardonnay, shiraz and pinot noir are the other varieties made in styles that seek to reflect the quality of their Adelaide Hills fruit, all elegance and poise, but without losing sight of intensity.

Martin, with the help of Adam Sadewitz, makes the wines while Michael evangelises about them around the world. They built a state of the art winery, cellars and offices, to a contemporary design, in 2000 and took the opportunity to incorporate the same environmentally aware philosophy they have always employed in the vineyards into the nuts and bolts of the heavily insulated buildings, including reduced water use, collecting rainwater and treating waste from the site, and they are pioneers of a state-wide initiative to monitor greenhouse emissions.

In 2011 they purchased the Tolpuddle Vineyards near Richmond in Tasmania, planted with 20 hectares of mature pinot noir and chardonnay. The vineyard takes its name from the Tolpuddle Martyrs, 19th century pioneers of the trade union movement who were transported to Australia in punishment for their activities. The leader of the Martyrs, George Loveless, served part of his sentence working on land that is now embraced by the vineyards. Light soils and a cool, dry climate produce intensely flavoured grapes with bright acidity, perfect for premium pinot noir and chardonnay production.
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Australia Vintage 2013

A fiercely hot year throughout Australia, with bush-fires causing difficulties of smoke taint in some parts. South Australia, the engine room of production on the continent in terms of quantity, recorded its hottest ever summer. The baking conditions led to a relatively early and condensed vintage in most regions. Areas with a moderating influence such as altitude or the proximity of the sea fared better, with Mornington Peninsula in Victoria and the island state of Tasmania having particularly fine vintages. Old vines in any region were able to overcome the drought stresses with their deep root systems so areas like Barossa made some excellent reds despite their propensity for hot conditions. Margaret River enjoyed yet another great vintage in 2013. The weather leading up to vintage was warm, the fruit produced was well balanced and yields were slightly down. By harvest time, the fruit quality was exceptional.

2013 vintage reviews

The Spectator

If the last time youtried Australian chardonnay was 1994 you will be in for a shock. Australia andespecially Tasmania, where this wine is from, makes some of the leanest mostelegant chardonnays on the the ...
If the last time youtried Australian chardonnay was 1994 you will be in for a shock. Australia andespecially Tasmania, where this wine is from, makes some of the leanest mostelegant chardonnays on the the planet. This wine is steely and lemony with a discretetoastiness, serve it blind to your crustiest uncle and he will swear it’s fromthe Côte D’Or.
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- Henry Jeffreys

The Daily Telegraph

Chardonnay ofinternational calibre. It is effortlessly understated and yet has so much goingon: grapefruit, peach, cream and smoke.

- Hamish Anderson

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