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Torbreck The Steading Barossa 2018

Red Wine from Australia - South Australia
Made from vines dating back to before the phylloxera outbreak of the 1880s, in around 45 different plots around the Barossa Valley, this is a first-hand demonstration of what this region does best via one of its truly great names. A beautifully balanced blend of grenache, shiraz and mourvèdre with generous dark bramble fruit, silky texture, rose-petal fragrance and finesse.
is no longer available
Code: AU23001

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Full-bodied
  • Grenache Syrah Mourvedre
  • 75cl
  • Now to 2029
  • 15% Alcohol
  • oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Cork, natural

South Australia

South Australia (SA) is Australia's wine heartland, producing most of the country's wine and boasting some of its oldest vines. The dry, hot climate ripens grapes fully, making bold, dense and concentrated wines.

The Barossa Valley has a rich viticultural history with patches of bush-trained vines, many more than 100 years old. It is first and foremost a red wine region. Shiraz is king but cabernet sauvignon, grenache and mourvèdre play an important part, too.

Close to the Barossa is the Eden Valley, a windswept series of elevated hills producing exceptional shiraz and floral riesling. Just north of the Barossa is the Clare Valley, which represents Australia's pinnacle for riesling, where elevated vineyards temper the intense heat, producing dry whites of immense class and purity. The region's powerful and muscular reds can be outstanding too.

On the coast south of Adelaide is McLaren Vale, which vies with Barossa to be SA's best red-wine region. The climate is warm enough to...

South Australia (SA) is Australia's wine heartland, producing most of the country's wine and boasting some of its oldest vines. The dry, hot climate ripens grapes fully, making bold, dense and concentrated wines.

The Barossa Valley has a rich viticultural history with patches of bush-trained vines, many more than 100 years old. It is first and foremost a red wine region. Shiraz is king but cabernet sauvignon, grenache and mourvèdre play an important part, too.

Close to the Barossa is the Eden Valley, a windswept series of elevated hills producing exceptional shiraz and floral riesling. Just north of the Barossa is the Clare Valley, which represents Australia's pinnacle for riesling, where elevated vineyards temper the intense heat, producing dry whites of immense class and purity. The region's powerful and muscular reds can be outstanding too.

On the coast south of Adelaide is McLaren Vale, which vies with Barossa to be SA's best red-wine region. The climate is warm enough to guarantee lush, chocolatey reds from shiraz, grenache and cabernet, while its strong maritime influence invests elegance in chardonnay, viognier and marsanne. Nearby Langhorne is cooled by the lake and nearby sea, and grows grapes of very good quality at a low cost. These excellent-value wines are marked by a softness and fullness of flavour. The Adelaide Hills area east of the city are cool and provide the perfect ingredients for lemony sauvignon blanc and chardonnay. Coonawarra, further south-east behind the Limestone Coast, is South Australia's leading cabernet region, the unique terra rossa soil and maritime influence producing grapes with intense flavours and fabulous structure.

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Torbreck

The roots of Torbreck first appear in 1992 when David Powell, then working for the noted Rockford Estate in the Barossa Valley, found and began to revive some plots of old and virtually derelict vines. After much hard work the vines were brought back to life and rewarded former lumberjack David with a crop of wonderful grapes. He managed to secure a contract to supply grapes from an ancient vineyard and in earned enough money to begin share-cropping the land, paying a percentage of the income to the owner in return for the right to manage the site as he saw fit. In 1994 he established Torbreck, named for the forest near Inverness, Scotland, where he had once worked and in 1995 he vinified his first wine, a shiraz-viognier blend, released it in 1997 as Run Rig alongside a 1996 blend of grenache, mataro (aka mourvèdre) and shiraz.

Almost as soon as he had released them he found them the centre of a huge amount of attention as critics and wine lover began to laud them. Twenty years later Torbreck makes 19 different cuvées to continued acclaim, sourcing fruit from a number of old, some might say ancient, dry-farmed vines in vineyards that are among the best in the Barossa. Among the sites acquired or leased is the historic and beautiful Hillside estate in Lyndoch with its gnarled vines and famous house.

The ethos here is to show just what the Barossa can do with the grape varieties that initially made its name – shiraz, grenache, mataro together with some marsanne and...
The roots of Torbreck first appear in 1992 when David Powell, then working for the noted Rockford Estate in the Barossa Valley, found and began to revive some plots of old and virtually derelict vines. After much hard work the vines were brought back to life and rewarded former lumberjack David with a crop of wonderful grapes. He managed to secure a contract to supply grapes from an ancient vineyard and in earned enough money to begin share-cropping the land, paying a percentage of the income to the owner in return for the right to manage the site as he saw fit. In 1994 he established Torbreck, named for the forest near Inverness, Scotland, where he had once worked and in 1995 he vinified his first wine, a shiraz-viognier blend, released it in 1997 as Run Rig alongside a 1996 blend of grenache, mataro (aka mourvèdre) and shiraz.

Almost as soon as he had released them he found them the centre of a huge amount of attention as critics and wine lover began to laud them. Twenty years later Torbreck makes 19 different cuvées to continued acclaim, sourcing fruit from a number of old, some might say ancient, dry-farmed vines in vineyards that are among the best in the Barossa. Among the sites acquired or leased is the historic and beautiful Hillside estate in Lyndoch with its gnarled vines and famous house.

The ethos here is to show just what the Barossa can do with the grape varieties that initially made its name – shiraz, grenache, mataro together with some marsanne and roussanne. It will come as no surprise to anyone who has tasted them that David Powell’s wines have been something of a tribute to the great wines of the Rhône Valley while remaining essentially Barossa.

In 2008 Powell was bought out by US entrepreneur Peter Knight, though he stayed on until 2013, and the new owner has retained the services of the company’s winemaker, Gary Isbel.
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