This is a carousel with zoom. Use the thumbnails to navigate, or jump to a slide. Use the zoom button to zoom into a image.

Cruz de Piedra Garnacha, Calatayud 2019

Red Wine from Spain
This year our buyers agreed with the many members who buy this popular, punchy and plump Spanish garnacha. Juicy, generous and satisfying, its hint of pepper spice made it stand out in a strong line-up at our Wine Champions tastings.
Price: £6.75 Bottle
Price: £40.50 Case of 6
In Stock
Code: SP16261

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Full-bodied
  • Grenache/Garnacha
  • 14.5% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Now to 2022
  • 75cl
  • Screwcap
Play Video
Director of Wine and buyer for Spain, Pierre Mansour, puts Cruz de Piedra Garnacha, Calatayud 2019 through its paces.

Virgen de la Sierra

Formed in 1954, Bodega Virgen de la Sierra was one of the first co-operatives in the Aragón region, situated towards the north-east of Spain. The co-op is located within the Calatayud appellation, around 100km south-east of Rioja, on the outskirts of the village of Villaroya de la Sierra.

Many of the company’s vineyards can be found high in the hills above this village, at an altitude of between 700-1100m. The bodega’s name is a nod to its location in the Sierra de la Virgen mountain range, which in turn gets its name from a shrine to the Virgin Mary that can be found around 22km north of the village. The path of pilgrimage to this shrine runs through the vineyards, and is marked with stone crosses. It is for this region the bodega named its main wine range Cruz de Piedra: this phrase means ‘stone crosses’ in Spanish.

The soils in this area are stony, loose and very poor in nutrients, so the vine roots must dig deep to find the water and nutrients they desire during the hot, dry summers. Most of the bodega’s vines are grown on red clay with a high iron content, giving wines that are full of flavour.

These conditions have proven ideal for garnacha. One of the main reasons this bodega creates such excellent-value wines is because of the age of their vines: 80% of its garnacha is between 50 and 100 years old, whereas the other main grape variety they cultivate, macabeo, is grown on vines with an average age of 60 years. After experimentation with various varieties, the co-op now ...
Formed in 1954, Bodega Virgen de la Sierra was one of the first co-operatives in the Aragón region, situated towards the north-east of Spain. The co-op is located within the Calatayud appellation, around 100km south-east of Rioja, on the outskirts of the village of Villaroya de la Sierra.

Many of the company’s vineyards can be found high in the hills above this village, at an altitude of between 700-1100m. The bodega’s name is a nod to its location in the Sierra de la Virgen mountain range, which in turn gets its name from a shrine to the Virgin Mary that can be found around 22km north of the village. The path of pilgrimage to this shrine runs through the vineyards, and is marked with stone crosses. It is for this region the bodega named its main wine range Cruz de Piedra: this phrase means ‘stone crosses’ in Spanish.

The soils in this area are stony, loose and very poor in nutrients, so the vine roots must dig deep to find the water and nutrients they desire during the hot, dry summers. Most of the bodega’s vines are grown on red clay with a high iron content, giving wines that are full of flavour.

These conditions have proven ideal for garnacha. One of the main reasons this bodega creates such excellent-value wines is because of the age of their vines: 80% of its garnacha is between 50 and 100 years old, whereas the other main grape variety they cultivate, macabeo, is grown on vines with an average age of 60 years. After experimentation with various varieties, the co-op now also grows small amounts of tempranillo and syrah, which also work well in these conditions.

Once harvested, the grapes are transported to the cellars, which have been managed by winemaker Manuel Castro since 2004. These cellars can hold 3.9 million litres, but the co-op also has separate buildings for bottling and storage. The winery is kitted out with modern technology and concrete tanks, and the Cruz de Piedra wines are cool-fermented and don’t see any oak in order to preserve the grapes’ lip-smacking fruit character.
Read more
2019 vintage reviews
2018 vintage reviews
2017 vintage reviews

Recommended for you

Back to top