Magnum of Muscadet Sèvre-et-Maine sur Lie 'Grand Mouton', Louis Métaireau 2016 is no longer available

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Magnum of Muscadet Sèvre-et-Maine sur Lie 'Grand Mouton', Louis Métaireau 2016

White Wine from France - Loire
Treat your seafood menu to this superior Muscadet from a fine producer in a top vintage. A selection from older vines and premium lots in the cellar, which brings extra body and flavour, freshness and length.
is no longer available
Code: LO13734

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • Dry
  • Muscadet
  • 12% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Now to 2026
  • 150cl (Magnum)
  • Cork, natural

Louis Metaireau

The man who gave this domaine his name, Louis Métaireau, was an innovative maker of, and a proselytiser for, the wines of Muscadet in the middle of the last century, who gathered about him a group of fellow winemakers – his band of vignerons d’art as he liked to call them – who were like-minded in their determination to restore the good name of the region. It was Louis, for example, who pioneered the leaving of wines on their fine lees over winter, the ‘sur-lie’ seen on the labels of the best Muscadets ever since, to add complexity to the wines. Louis’ daughter Marie-Luce and her husband Jean-François Guilbaud took up the reins and worked hard for many years to maintain and improve upon his legacy.

Over time they acquired as much of the land formerly worked by the ‘band of vignerons d’art’ as they could to comprise one of the very best sites in the region, the 23 hectare Grand Mouton vineyard in the heart of the Muscadet de Sèvre-et-Maine appellation, on a slope overlooking the commune of Saint-Fiacre and its ancient church. Lying between the two rivers that give the appellation its name, the vineyard contains some of the oldest vines of the domaine, indeed in the region, which are nurtured organically, though not certified as such. They are also hand-harvested to ensure quality, a very unusual thing where machine harvesting is the norm these days. From these vines come the fruit that makes the best cuvées, including Petit Mouton and Grand Mouton, the latter harvested a...
The man who gave this domaine his name, Louis Métaireau, was an innovative maker of, and a proselytiser for, the wines of Muscadet in the middle of the last century, who gathered about him a group of fellow winemakers – his band of vignerons d’art as he liked to call them – who were like-minded in their determination to restore the good name of the region. It was Louis, for example, who pioneered the leaving of wines on their fine lees over winter, the ‘sur-lie’ seen on the labels of the best Muscadets ever since, to add complexity to the wines. Louis’ daughter Marie-Luce and her husband Jean-François Guilbaud took up the reins and worked hard for many years to maintain and improve upon his legacy.

Over time they acquired as much of the land formerly worked by the ‘band of vignerons d’art’ as they could to comprise one of the very best sites in the region, the 23 hectare Grand Mouton vineyard in the heart of the Muscadet de Sèvre-et-Maine appellation, on a slope overlooking the commune of Saint-Fiacre and its ancient church. Lying between the two rivers that give the appellation its name, the vineyard contains some of the oldest vines of the domaine, indeed in the region, which are nurtured organically, though not certified as such. They are also hand-harvested to ensure quality, a very unusual thing where machine harvesting is the norm these days. From these vines come the fruit that makes the best cuvées, including Petit Mouton and Grand Mouton, the latter harvested a little later for more richness. They also own vineyards in the communes of La Haye-Fouassière and Maisdon-sur-Sèvre, from which they make cuvée MLM (named for Marie-Luce) and cuvée Carte Noire respectively. The youngest vines in any of the vineyards are more than 30 years old.

The wines spend the winter on their lees and are then tasted parcel by parcel to decide on which cuvée they will go into. Bottling is carried out in the spring, gently and without filtration. The care and attention paid to every aspect of the viticulture and the winemaking shows clearly in the quality in the bottle.

In 2019 the domaine opened a new chapter, following the acquisition of the property by Julien and Laure Rossignol, who took over in November 2019, having worked the harvest with the Métaireaus who remain on hand to support the transition to the next phase for this lovely property. Originally from Grenoble and Toulouse respectively, after twenty years working in Paris they decided to move to a new life and passion.
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Loire Valley Vintage 2016 Muscadet

Perhaps more than any year in recent memory, the Loire was hit with pretty much everything in 2016; a wet early season, early spring frosts and cool temperatures at flowering affecting quantities in places. But luckily a fine end to a challenging season brought huge sighs of relief to growers who managed each new threat with vigilance and patience. Early tastings have shown good, clean fruit in an appealing style which should provide plenty of pleasure in the short to mid term.

The 2016 growing season was one of the most complicated in living memory. Loire vignerons are made of stern stuff and rose to the challenge, despite widespread despondency at the end of August after a heatwave with exceptionally high temperatures that felt like the last straw. Spring was very wet, many appellations were hit by severe frost in April, and it was cool around the critical flowering period, by which time many were already looking at a reduced crop. Severe drought followed and vines – and growers –...
Perhaps more than any year in recent memory, the Loire was hit with pretty much everything in 2016; a wet early season, early spring frosts and cool temperatures at flowering affecting quantities in places. But luckily a fine end to a challenging season brought huge sighs of relief to growers who managed each new threat with vigilance and patience. Early tastings have shown good, clean fruit in an appealing style which should provide plenty of pleasure in the short to mid term.

The 2016 growing season was one of the most complicated in living memory. Loire vignerons are made of stern stuff and rose to the challenge, despite widespread despondency at the end of August after a heatwave with exceptionally high temperatures that felt like the last straw. Spring was very wet, many appellations were hit by severe frost in April, and it was cool around the critical flowering period, by which time many were already looking at a reduced crop. Severe drought followed and vines – and growers – were ready to give up, when miraculously, a sprinkling of reviving rain arrived, accompanied by fine weather with cooler evenings, and then a little more rain to help to ripen the grapes and boost the size of the crop.
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2016 vintage reviews
2014 vintage reviews
2012 vintage reviews

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