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The Society's Exhibition Vacqueyras 2019

Red Wine from France - Rhone
Vacqueyras is a key appellation in the southern Rhône, here made from a blend of grenache with around a quarter of syrah. The result is a dark, brooding red with plum, spice and a dash of pepper. Perfect with grilled meats.
Price: £12.50 Bottle
Price: £150.00 Case of 12
In Stock
Code: RH60221

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Full-bodied
  • Grenache Syrah
  • 14.5% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Now to 2026
  • 75cl
  • Cork, natural

Southern Rhône (excluding Chateauneuf)

Producing over 3.5m hl (hectolitres), this is the second biggest region for production of appellation contrôlée wine in France after Bordeaux. Most is red, though production of both white and pink is growing. Some 20 grape varieties are planted in the south though one in particular, Grenache, gives the region as a whole its identity: generosity, body, weight and a definite tendency to making big wines. More than half of the production is of Côtes-du-Rhône with the best sold as Côtes-du-Rhône Villages. Better still are the so-called crus led by Châteauneuf-du-Pape itself.

Châteauneuf-du-Pape: This large area to the north of Avignon makes the best wines of the south. Reds tend to be grenache based with syrah, mourvèdre and counoise also used. Few wines combine immense strength with perfect elegance quite so convincingly. Word of caution: Châteauneuf produces as much wine as the whole of the northern Rhône put together. A third is very good, a third acceptable and the last third,...
Producing over 3.5m hl (hectolitres), this is the second biggest region for production of appellation contrôlée wine in France after Bordeaux. Most is red, though production of both white and pink is growing. Some 20 grape varieties are planted in the south though one in particular, Grenache, gives the region as a whole its identity: generosity, body, weight and a definite tendency to making big wines. More than half of the production is of Côtes-du-Rhône with the best sold as Côtes-du-Rhône Villages. Better still are the so-called crus led by Châteauneuf-du-Pape itself.

Châteauneuf-du-Pape: This large area to the north of Avignon makes the best wines of the south. Reds tend to be grenache based with syrah, mourvèdre and counoise also used. Few wines combine immense strength with perfect elegance quite so convincingly. Word of caution: Châteauneuf produces as much wine as the whole of the northern Rhône put together. A third is very good, a third acceptable and the last third, undrinkable.

Right bank: Villages include Tavel (rosé only) Lirac, Saint-Gervais and Laudun. There is more rain here but it is also hot and grapes are therefore early ripening. Most of the area lies in the département of the Gard and stretches from the river westwards towards Nîmes where at some ill-defined line in the soil, the Rhône becomes the Languedoc. This is an area that has much improved over the years and has become a valuable source for very fine, concentrated syrah wines in particular.

A little further on are the Costieres de Nimes, a large area of upland plateau, south-east of Nîmes. For the moment the Costières produces good everyday wines of good quality but there is potential to do much more.

Northern hills: There are fresh sub-alpine breezes at work here and as a result the wines often have a distinct freshness too. Just north of Orange is the largely wooded and isolated Massif d'Uchaux. Many of its star producers here are able to farm organically.

The three 'Vs' : Valréas, Visan and Vinsobres: These are three top neighbouring villages (with a 4th, Saint-Maurice broadly similar to Vinsobres). Vinsobres has full cru status and makes superb wine. Best names include Perrin, now the largest land owner and Domaine Jaume whose wines have been charming members since the 1979 vintage.

Valréas and Visan are planted on the same hill but tend to look north. Emmanuel Bouchard is one of the top names in Valréas. Adrien Fabre makes both outstanding examples of both Visan and Saint-Maurice.

Tricastin/Grignan-lès-Adhémar - The Tricastin is a much neglected part of the Rhône and coming down from the northern Rhône, these are the first vines one sees. It's a relatively cool area, far too cold for growing mourvèdre successfully, but the whites do very well and so does the syrah grape. The area has seen a name change as Tricastin is also the name of a power station on the river. The new name for the wines (which doesn't exactly trip off the tongue), is Grignan-lès-Adhémar.

Central hills - This includes the villages of Cairanne and Rasteau along with neighbouring Roaix. Big full-bodied wines, grenache dominated. Rasteau is all power and might while Cairanne is more deicate.

Plan de Dieu - Large flat expanse of pudding stones that seem to stretch as far as the eye can see, in the middle of which there is an airfield, (largely built for the Luftwaffe) surrounded by vines. Full-bodied style. Excellent for mourvèdre. Jaboulet are very good here as is the Meffre family.

Eastern fringes - Set against an iconic landscape with Mont Ventoux and the craggy Dentelles de Montmirail as the backdrop, some of these hillsides were first planted by the Romans and include some of the best-known names in the Rhône Valley.

Gigondas: Mountain wine, late harvested, always dramatic and very full-bodied though never coarse or overweight. These are generous reds, capable of long ageing. A little rosé is also made.

Vacqueyras: Next door to Gigondas yet different. Fruitier, a shade less powerful and more obviously charming:

Beaumes de Venise: The red is as full as Gigondas but rounder and less complex and this village is better known for its sweet muscat, a vin doux naturel and perfect for desserts.

Ventoux: At nearly 2000m this is some mountain which scores of cyclists are forced to conquer every year in the Tour de France. Its lower slopes are vineyard country though. Traditionally these were known as Côtes du Ventoux and were made and sold cheaply. Things are changing though with more estates cutting yields and making full and concentrated wine, not dissimilar to and better value than many Châteauneufs.
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Domaine Le Clos Des Cazaux

The Archimbaud-Vache family – owners of Clos des Cazaux – is one of the oldest families in Vacqueyras, with roots dating back to 1791. Even the building containing its tasting cellars dates back to this era, although the family has since expanded across the southern Rhône. The property is currently run by brothers Jean-Michel and Frédéric Vache.

The family began planting vines in the 19th century, but this didn’t become the sole focus of the estate until 1957, when a terrible frost wiped out the olive groves that made up the rest of it.

The estate gets its name from when the property was owned by the Knights Templar. At the time, a cattle grower in this area was called a ‘Chazal’, but this word evolved over the years into ‘Cazaux’. The family began bottling their wine under the name Clos des Cazaux in 1959 and have never looked back.

The scope of the portfolio was extended beyond Vacqueyras in 1936 when a member of the family, Gabriel Archimbaud, was involved in the classification of the term Côtes-du-Rhône. Clos des Cazaux has been making wines under this appellation ever since, and in 1954 began making Gigondas when the family purchased vines in that area.

The Clos des Cazaux vineyards in Vacqueyras are beautiful, well-exposed suntraps, becoming so hot in the summer that the grapes ripen around two weeks earlier than the hilly, cooler Gigondas sites. The soils, mostly clay and limestone, are covered in flat, heat-retaining pebbles.

Vineyards are maintained entirely by hand,...
The Archimbaud-Vache family – owners of Clos des Cazaux – is one of the oldest families in Vacqueyras, with roots dating back to 1791. Even the building containing its tasting cellars dates back to this era, although the family has since expanded across the southern Rhône. The property is currently run by brothers Jean-Michel and Frédéric Vache.

The family began planting vines in the 19th century, but this didn’t become the sole focus of the estate until 1957, when a terrible frost wiped out the olive groves that made up the rest of it.

The estate gets its name from when the property was owned by the Knights Templar. At the time, a cattle grower in this area was called a ‘Chazal’, but this word evolved over the years into ‘Cazaux’. The family began bottling their wine under the name Clos des Cazaux in 1959 and have never looked back.

The scope of the portfolio was extended beyond Vacqueyras in 1936 when a member of the family, Gabriel Archimbaud, was involved in the classification of the term Côtes-du-Rhône. Clos des Cazaux has been making wines under this appellation ever since, and in 1954 began making Gigondas when the family purchased vines in that area.

The Clos des Cazaux vineyards in Vacqueyras are beautiful, well-exposed suntraps, becoming so hot in the summer that the grapes ripen around two weeks earlier than the hilly, cooler Gigondas sites. The soils, mostly clay and limestone, are covered in flat, heat-retaining pebbles.

Vineyards are maintained entirely by hand, including 100% hand harvesting. They also operate a yearly ‘green harvest’ in which they prune away around 20% of the unripe grapes, believing as many other growers do that this improves the quality of the remaining bunches. However, they do not allow the grapes to over-ripen before harvest and they discard any split or unhealthy ones prior to fermentation.

Wines are vinified simply in concrete tanks to retain freshness and fruit flavour, but the hot climate gives Vacqueyras’ typical body and power. The Society’s Exhibition Vacqueyras, made by Clos des Cazaux, remains a benchmark example of the region.
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Rhône Vintage 2019

The 2019 Rhône vintage continued this region’s run of excellent vintages with surely the boldest statement yet. Of past vintages, 1990 springs to mind for the purity of fruit and ripeness of the tannins, but on a much bigger scale.

The climate of course played its part in full and as in previous years, heat and drought were overriding factors that shaped the destiny of this vintage. But that is not the whole story. What is exceptional about the 2019 vintage is that the wines are not lacking in acidity and therefore have freshness. Stranger still, pH values, a good way of assessing a vintage, are often quite low.
So what were the ‘X’ factors that make 2019 so special? For a start, though there were indeed times of drought, ground water was never really lacking. Autumn rainfall had been plentiful enough. Temperatures for the first months of the year remain on the cool side. Then there was much needed rain in April and May, just when the vine needed it most before flowering. For...
The 2019 Rhône vintage continued this region’s run of excellent vintages with surely the boldest statement yet. Of past vintages, 1990 springs to mind for the purity of fruit and ripeness of the tannins, but on a much bigger scale.

The climate of course played its part in full and as in previous years, heat and drought were overriding factors that shaped the destiny of this vintage. But that is not the whole story. What is exceptional about the 2019 vintage is that the wines are not lacking in acidity and therefore have freshness. Stranger still, pH values, a good way of assessing a vintage, are often quite low.
So what were the ‘X’ factors that make 2019 so special? For a start, though there were indeed times of drought, ground water was never really lacking. Autumn rainfall had been plentiful enough. Temperatures for the first months of the year remain on the cool side. Then there was much needed rain in April and May, just when the vine needed it most before flowering. For most, these would be the last rains until the end of August. And then of course was the heat – sometimes excessive with peaks occasionally exceeding 40C – but never constant, and temperatures at night remained relatively cool, allowing the vine to rest. Late summer rains come as a relief and is then followed by a final heatwave in September, setting the harvest in a blaze of sunshine.

Everywhere made exceptional wines. Both the northern and southern Rhône produced brilliant 2019s. The grenache grape knows all about heat, but what was remarkable was the quality of the so-called ‘second-tier’ varieties such as cinsault and counoise. Such conditions are not common in the north, but the vine adapts and there was no water shortage. That said, the syrahs from the north are like nothing before: so dark, brooding and strong. ‘Flamboyance’ is a word that crops up in tasting notes and is a truly apt one in describing these wines. Speaking to a grower with the gift of synaesthesia, the colour red in all its shades, seemed to define this vintage.
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2019 vintage reviews
2018 vintage reviews

Sussex Express

[This] from one of the great appellations of the Southern Rhone valley, comes from Domaine le Clos des Cazaux. Full bodied and fruity, yet remaining light, it is a blend of grenache and syrah and is...
[This] from one of the great appellations of the Southern Rhone valley, comes from Domaine le Clos des Cazaux. Full bodied and fruity, yet remaining light, it is a blend of grenache and syrah and is fabulous value at £12.50. Spicy, plummy, with a hint of black pepper.
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- Richard Esling

Hampstead & Highgate Express

Remarkable value with a long life ahead.

- Liz Sagues

Rotherham and South Yorkshire Advertiser

Grenache with 25% syrah. This is peppery with deep flavours of plum and spice. -

David Clay

Lynn News

This is my red of the year thus far. OK, the Léoville-Barton 1982 is my red of the year, but that's £200 (I wasn't paying) so this is my affordable red of the year. This is...
This is my red of the year thus far. OK, the Léoville-Barton 1982 is my red of the year, but that's £200 (I wasn't paying) so this is my affordable red of the year. This is simply stunning. If you like your reds with plenty of power, to have more fruit than Kent and more power than the Duracell bunny, then this is for you. Prunes, cherries, strawberries, herbs, minerals and a grip like a vice, this is the perfect wine for barbecued red meats. I thought this was around the £18 mark, so when I discovered it was £12.50 I bought two cases.
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- Giles Luckett

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