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Vin de France 'Résilience' Chenin Blanc, Alexandre Cady 2020

White Wine from France - Loire
A wine born of friendship and determination, when the Cady family's vineyards and winery were hit by the tragic double whammy of a devastating fire and damaging spring frost, this is a precise young chenin, crisp, dry and refreshing. Cady's wines have been certified organic for some time now but, in a year when wine was in short supply locally, he was unable to find sufficient volume of organically certified wine for this blend. Nevertheless, it shows Alex’s deft touch for this most versatile of grapes.
Price: £9.95 Bottle
Price: £119.00 Case of 12
In Stock
Code: LO16731

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • Bone dry
  • Chenin Blanc
  • 12.5% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Now to 2023
  • 75cl
  • Cork, diam

Loire

The Loire is the longest river in France, stretching some 1,000km from its source in the south to the Atlantic coast a little west of Nantes. At times majestic, never more so than when overlooked by one of the many spectacular châteaux that lie close to its banks, it was in the past a vital trade waterway. Today, it is better known as a tourist destination. Throughout, the river has been a key factor in the production of wine, whether as a transport route, as a supply of water, for its cooling effects on the surrounding land, or for the mist that often lingers along parts of the valley and helps in the production of many of the fine sweet wines that the Loire Valley is famous for.

The geology and climate - the terroir - varies dramatically along the length of the Loire, and, as a result, so too does the choice of grapes planted and the style of wines produced.

Red wines are in the minority but a combination of vastly improved husbandry over the last few years coupled with what looks...
The Loire is the longest river in France, stretching some 1,000km from its source in the south to the Atlantic coast a little west of Nantes. At times majestic, never more so than when overlooked by one of the many spectacular châteaux that lie close to its banks, it was in the past a vital trade waterway. Today, it is better known as a tourist destination. Throughout, the river has been a key factor in the production of wine, whether as a transport route, as a supply of water, for its cooling effects on the surrounding land, or for the mist that often lingers along parts of the valley and helps in the production of many of the fine sweet wines that the Loire Valley is famous for.

The geology and climate - the terroir - varies dramatically along the length of the Loire, and, as a result, so too does the choice of grapes planted and the style of wines produced.

Red wines are in the minority but a combination of vastly improved husbandry over the last few years coupled with what looks increasingly to be the effects of climate change have made these wines more and more attractive. The main varieties are:

Gamay produces wines akin to Beaujolais in the south; in the Touraine, gamay generally has less overt fruit and a slightly earthy character which is not unattractive with food but some will find an acquired taste.

Cabernet franc, one of Bordeaux’s grapes, is normally grown here as a single varietal. At its best it has a lovely fragrance and freshness with a good, gentle tannin structure, making it the ideal lunchtime red.

Pinot noir is the most delicate of the Loire’s red grapes, producing excellent rosé as well as fine reds that can rival good village Burgundy (more Côte de Beaune than Côte de Nuits in style).

Whites are made principally from three single grape varieties. Muscadet, or melon de Bourgogne as it is still sometimes called in France, dominates in the far west, producing fresh, dry, sappy wines that are at their best with seafood.

Chenin blanc covers much of the vineyard land around and between Angers and Tours, and is responsible for the Loire’s sweet wines as well as some excellent - and quite varied - dry ones. Many develop greater finesse and complexity with age, but chenin is a grape that requires patience and understanding as, more than any other variety, it can pass through a rather ungenerous "closed" phase, only to blossom again later. Something Noël Pinguet of Domaine Huet likens to the unresponsive teenage years of our children.

Sauvignon blanc offers important volumes of good, everyday drinking in the Touraine region but produces its best examples in the Central Vineyards of Sancerre and Pouilly and its near neighbours Menetou-Salon, Reuilly, and Quincy. Loire sauvignon is rarely oaked and is normally fresh, grassy, bone dry and lightly aromatic, making it the perfect wine to serve with fish.


Other than the grape, two other key factors should influence your choice of Loire wines. Far and away the most important is the name of the producer. Buy from a trusted, ideally tried and tested source and you will not be disappointed in quality terms.

The other major influence in the Loire is the style and quality of the vintage. As one of France’s most northerly wine producing regions, and even with the apparent effects of climate change, the Loire does suffer from the vagaries of the weather, which means that the quality and even more the style of the harvest can vary quite significantly.

As a very rough rule of thumb, if we have poor spring and summer weather in the UK then chances are there will have been similarly poor weather in the Loire. On these occasions it is all the more important to stick to growers you trust, read whatever information you have easy access to in order to better inform your choice, and be prepared to adapt to sometimes significant shifts in style. 2005 and 2006 were warm, healthy vintages with ripe fruit and lower acidity, producing more approachable wines. 2007 and 2008 mark a return to much more typical, classically styled Loire vintages with wines that are lighter in body (and alcohol) and with much fresher acidity. If you are lucky you will enjoy both, but many will have a strong preference for one style over another.
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Domaine Cady

Since 1927, four generations of the Cady family have run this estate, with Alexandre Cady most recently taking over from his father, Philippe.

Situated in the hills of Coteaux du Layon, an appellation by the Layon River in the Loire’s Anjou region, there are 22 hectares under vine. The majority of these are chenin blanc, planted on some of the finest schist, quartz and Varennes stone slopes of Saint-Aubin and Chaume, as well as a chunk of cabernet franc and small amounts of gamay, chardonnay and grolleau.

Grapes are harvested by hand, with the chenin blanc for the Coteaux du Layon undergoing several pickings to select only the ones affected by the right level of noble rot.

In the winery, the grapes are vinified in temperature-controlled glass-lined underground vats for freshness, after which the wine matures on its lees, adding richness and a concentrated creamy texture to the fruity, honeyed character.
2020 vintage reviews

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