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Blind Spot Great Southern Cabernet Sauvignon 2019

Red Wine from Australia - Western Australia
Full, grippy and generous cabernet sauvignon, with purple fruit and hallmark cabernet bay leaf character. This is a benchmark Australian cabernet but without being too challenging, this has bags of cassis, plum and red apple notes.
Price: £10.50 Bottle
Price: £126.00 Case of 12
In Stock
Code: AU23231

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Full-bodied
  • Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 14% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Now to 2026
  • 75cl
  • Screwcap

Western Australia

The isolated state of Western Australia is known for its spectacular scenery, golden-sand beaches and giant Karri tree forests. A relatively cool (in Australian terms) Mediterranean climate of warm, breezy summer days and cool nights dominates the wine-producing areas. The resulting wines tend to combine fruit ripeness with freshness – an unusual combination in Australia – which makes the wines particularly appealing.

The Margaret River area was the first to suggest Western Australia’s potential for making premium wines. Elegant, ageworthy cabernet sauvignon originally put the spotlight on Margaret River and is still its trump card. Chardonnay shines here, too, as do the vibrantly fruity, zesty semillon/sauvignon blanc blends.

Further south and west you find the Great Southern sub-region, 400 kilometres from Perth. The vineyards of the Great Southern region provide 37% of all the grapes produced in Western Australia. The five sub-regions – Albany, Denmark, Frankland River,...
The isolated state of Western Australia is known for its spectacular scenery, golden-sand beaches and giant Karri tree forests. A relatively cool (in Australian terms) Mediterranean climate of warm, breezy summer days and cool nights dominates the wine-producing areas. The resulting wines tend to combine fruit ripeness with freshness – an unusual combination in Australia – which makes the wines particularly appealing.

The Margaret River area was the first to suggest Western Australia’s potential for making premium wines. Elegant, ageworthy cabernet sauvignon originally put the spotlight on Margaret River and is still its trump card. Chardonnay shines here, too, as do the vibrantly fruity, zesty semillon/sauvignon blanc blends.

Further south and west you find the Great Southern sub-region, 400 kilometres from Perth. The vineyards of the Great Southern region provide 37% of all the grapes produced in Western Australia. The five sub-regions – Albany, Denmark, Frankland River, Mount Barker and the Porongorups – all have vastly different climatic conditions, but generally Great Southern is the coolest of all of Western Australia. The long growing season, relatively low rainfall, poor soils and low yields result in high-quality wines with excellent fruit intensity. The best wines of the region are riesling (dry, almost austere, with superb definition and purity) and shiraz, though sauvignon blanc is now attracting attention too.

Further north, and closer to Perth, the Swan Valley was the first area of Western Australia to be commercially planted and despite some fierce summer temperatures can make crisp, fresh whites and full-bodied reds.
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Blind Spot

The Society’s exclusive range of Blind Spot wines is one of our most exciting ventures in recent years and helps our members to get the best of Australian vineyards at what many leading wine critics agree is incredible value. It was developed because our Australia Buyer Pierre Mansour realised we were missing out on opportunities to sample some of the country’s most interesting treasures: the tiny parcels of exquisite grapes that are often swallowed up in large-scale Australian blends.

Although most of The Society’s Australian producers are small-scale winemakers making top quality wine, the industry is still dominated by much larger companies who have access to fruit from a huge and diverse range of vineyard sites. Some of these are hidden gems, doomed to remain in the collective “blind spot”.

It’s impossible for us to find them by ourselves, so we needed to find a man who could, to act as our eyes, ears and palate when it comes to grabbing these excellent but limited opportunities. Mac Forbes was the obvious candidate for this role: not only is he a fantastic winemaker in his own right, but his extensive experience working for big Australian wineries means he knows exactly where to look for these intriguing parcels of grapes. He sends The Society samples of the most promising selections, and we then carefully streamline his suggestions, choosing only the ones that best suit our members’ tastes. Mac even bottles the wines for us, and this - combined with the fact that his...
The Society’s exclusive range of Blind Spot wines is one of our most exciting ventures in recent years and helps our members to get the best of Australian vineyards at what many leading wine critics agree is incredible value. It was developed because our Australia Buyer Pierre Mansour realised we were missing out on opportunities to sample some of the country’s most interesting treasures: the tiny parcels of exquisite grapes that are often swallowed up in large-scale Australian blends.

Although most of The Society’s Australian producers are small-scale winemakers making top quality wine, the industry is still dominated by much larger companies who have access to fruit from a huge and diverse range of vineyard sites. Some of these are hidden gems, doomed to remain in the collective “blind spot”.

It’s impossible for us to find them by ourselves, so we needed to find a man who could, to act as our eyes, ears and palate when it comes to grabbing these excellent but limited opportunities. Mac Forbes was the obvious candidate for this role: not only is he a fantastic winemaker in his own right, but his extensive experience working for big Australian wineries means he knows exactly where to look for these intriguing parcels of grapes. He sends The Society samples of the most promising selections, and we then carefully streamline his suggestions, choosing only the ones that best suit our members’ tastes. Mac even bottles the wines for us, and this - combined with the fact that his expertise allows us to buy in bulk with confidence - is exactly why we can offer them at such a competitive price. One of the most interesting features of the Blind Spot range is its opportunism: because we rely on one-off discoveries, we may not be able to replicate future vintages of many of the wines in our range, but the wines we do feature will always be something special.

For instance, we may have exhausted our supplies of the popular Sangiovese we sold the year we launched the range, but the following year we managed to find a benchmark example of a Clare Valley riesling and sell it at a price accessible to all members. That’s the beauty of Blind Spot: it’s a moveable feast, constantly evolving and bringing us new discoveries to enjoy each year.
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Australia Vintage 2019

It’s hard to give a blanket picture of how Australia has done in any particular vintage as, frankly, it’s huge! Regional variation notwithstanding, 2019 generally looks good in most regions after an excellent 2018. Drought, though, continued to be a problem, and rising temperatures in places such as McLaren Vale mean that alcohol levels are only going in one direction.

However, I would urge members not to base their view of the entirety of Australia on what is going on in Barossa or McLaren Vale. 2019 in Margaret River produced some excellent wines and this continues to be a world-class region for elegant, silky and delicious cabernet-based wines. Tasmania, Yarra and Mornington Peninsula have also shone in the 2019 vintage and demonstrate how fantastic Australia is for cooler-climate winemaking. Thanks to Margaret River and Mornington Peninsula’s sea influence (therefore keeping temperatures cooler) and the microclimates of Yarra Valley and Tasmania, these regions are set to...
It’s hard to give a blanket picture of how Australia has done in any particular vintage as, frankly, it’s huge! Regional variation notwithstanding, 2019 generally looks good in most regions after an excellent 2018. Drought, though, continued to be a problem, and rising temperatures in places such as McLaren Vale mean that alcohol levels are only going in one direction.

However, I would urge members not to base their view of the entirety of Australia on what is going on in Barossa or McLaren Vale. 2019 in Margaret River produced some excellent wines and this continues to be a world-class region for elegant, silky and delicious cabernet-based wines. Tasmania, Yarra and Mornington Peninsula have also shone in the 2019 vintage and demonstrate how fantastic Australia is for cooler-climate winemaking. Thanks to Margaret River and Mornington Peninsula’s sea influence (therefore keeping temperatures cooler) and the microclimates of Yarra Valley and Tasmania, these regions are set to become increasingly important and worth following.
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2019 vintage reviews

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