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Blind Spot Touriga Nacional 2020

Red Wine from Australia - South Australia
With fruit from both McLaren Vale and Langhorne Creek, this is a fascinating Australian wine. The nose is constantly evolving, with blueberry, plum and cinnamon notes, which intensifies on the palate. The finish is impressive and the fruit is joined by a hint of spice. Decant for 30 minutes or so.
Price: £10.50 Bottle
Price: £126.00 Case of 12
In Stock
Code: AU23191

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Full-bodied
  • Touriga Nacional
  • 13% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Now to 2025
  • 75cl
  • Screwcap

South Australia

South Australia (SA) is Australia’s wine heartland, producing most of the country's wine and boasting some of its oldest vines. The dry, hot climate ripens grapes fully, making bold, dense and concentrated wines.

The Barossa Valley has a rich viticultural history with patches of bush-trained vines, many more than 100 years old. It is first and foremost a red wine region. Shiraz is king but cabernet sauvignon, grenache and mourvèdre play an important part, too.

Close to the Barossa is the Eden Valley, a windswept series of elevated hills producing exceptional shiraz and floral riesling. Just north of the Barossa is the Clare Valley, which represents Australia's pinnacle for riesling, where elevated vineyards temper the intense heat, producing dry whites of immense class and purity. The region’s powerful and muscular reds can be outstanding too.

On the coast south of Adelaide is McLaren Vale, which vies with Barossa to be SA's best red-wine region. The climate is warm enough to...
South Australia (SA) is Australia’s wine heartland, producing most of the country's wine and boasting some of its oldest vines. The dry, hot climate ripens grapes fully, making bold, dense and concentrated wines.

The Barossa Valley has a rich viticultural history with patches of bush-trained vines, many more than 100 years old. It is first and foremost a red wine region. Shiraz is king but cabernet sauvignon, grenache and mourvèdre play an important part, too.

Close to the Barossa is the Eden Valley, a windswept series of elevated hills producing exceptional shiraz and floral riesling. Just north of the Barossa is the Clare Valley, which represents Australia's pinnacle for riesling, where elevated vineyards temper the intense heat, producing dry whites of immense class and purity. The region’s powerful and muscular reds can be outstanding too.

On the coast south of Adelaide is McLaren Vale, which vies with Barossa to be SA's best red-wine region. The climate is warm enough to guarantee lush, chocolatey reds from shiraz, grenache and cabernet, while its strong maritime influence invests elegance in chardonnay, viognier and marsanne. Nearby Langhorne is cooled by the lake and nearby sea, and grows grapes of very good quality at a low cost. These excellent-value wines are marked by a softness and fullness of flavour. The Adelaide Hills area east of the city are cool and provide the perfect ingredients for lemony sauvignon blanc and chardonnay. Coonawarra, further south-east behind the Limestone Coast, is South Australia's leading cabernet region, the unique terra rossa soil and maritime influence producing grapes with intense flavours and fabulous structure.
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Blind Spot

The Society’s exclusive range of Blind Spot wines is one of our most exciting ventures in recent years and helps our members to get the best of Australian vineyards at what many leading wine critics agree is incredible value. It was developed because our Australia Buyer Pierre Mansour realised we were missing out on opportunities to sample some of the country’s most interesting treasures: the tiny parcels of exquisite grapes that are often swallowed up in large-scale Australian blends.

Although most of The Society’s Australian producers are small-scale winemakers making top quality wine, the industry is still dominated by much larger companies who have access to fruit from a huge and diverse range of vineyard sites. Some of these are hidden gems, doomed to remain in the collective “blind spot”.

It’s impossible for us to find them by ourselves, so we needed to find a man who could, to act as our eyes, ears and palate when it comes to grabbing these excellent but limited opportunities. Mac Forbes was the obvious candidate for this role: not only is he a fantastic winemaker in his own right, but his extensive experience working for big Australian wineries means he knows exactly where to look for these intriguing parcels of grapes. He sends The Society samples of the most promising selections, and we then carefully streamline his suggestions, choosing only the ones that best suit our members’ tastes. Mac even bottles the wines for us, and this - combined with the fact that his...
The Society’s exclusive range of Blind Spot wines is one of our most exciting ventures in recent years and helps our members to get the best of Australian vineyards at what many leading wine critics agree is incredible value. It was developed because our Australia Buyer Pierre Mansour realised we were missing out on opportunities to sample some of the country’s most interesting treasures: the tiny parcels of exquisite grapes that are often swallowed up in large-scale Australian blends.

Although most of The Society’s Australian producers are small-scale winemakers making top quality wine, the industry is still dominated by much larger companies who have access to fruit from a huge and diverse range of vineyard sites. Some of these are hidden gems, doomed to remain in the collective “blind spot”.

It’s impossible for us to find them by ourselves, so we needed to find a man who could, to act as our eyes, ears and palate when it comes to grabbing these excellent but limited opportunities. Mac Forbes was the obvious candidate for this role: not only is he a fantastic winemaker in his own right, but his extensive experience working for big Australian wineries means he knows exactly where to look for these intriguing parcels of grapes. He sends The Society samples of the most promising selections, and we then carefully streamline his suggestions, choosing only the ones that best suit our members’ tastes. Mac even bottles the wines for us, and this - combined with the fact that his expertise allows us to buy in bulk with confidence - is exactly why we can offer them at such a competitive price. One of the most interesting features of the Blind Spot range is its opportunism: because we rely on one-off discoveries, we may not be able to replicate future vintages of many of the wines in our range, but the wines we do feature will always be something special.

For instance, we may have exhausted our supplies of the popular Sangiovese we sold the year we launched the range, but the following year we managed to find a benchmark example of a Clare Valley riesling and sell it at a price accessible to all members. That’s the beauty of Blind Spot: it’s a moveable feast, constantly evolving and bringing us new discoveries to enjoy each year.
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2020 vintage reviews

joannasimon.com

Wine of the Week: This is one of a trio of interesting reds that The Wine Society has just added to its Blind Spot Australian range (the others are a Montepulciano and a Carignan). I’ve...
Wine of the Week: This is one of a trio of interesting reds that The Wine Society has just added to its Blind Spot Australian range (the others are a Montepulciano and a Carignan). I’ve written about the thinking behind the range before  but, in a nutshell, they’re wines made from small parcels of top-quality grapes, ferreted out before they disappear into big-company blends. The Society chooses from samples sent by its man down under, winemaker Mac Forbes, and he makes and bottles the wine. They’re usually very good value. The Touriga Nacional, a Langhorne Creek/McLaren Vale blend, is darkly fruity with ripe black berries and violets, smoky mineral notes and a splash of spice, vanilla oak and dark chocolate. It’s really quite sumptuous, but not heavy on alcohol and with a savoury freshness that the celebrated port grape has on its home turf in the Douro. It’s ready now but will happily evolve over the next four or five years. If Touriga isn’t a variety you associate with Australia, it’s long been there on a small scale, originally planted for fortified wines, like most varieties. It’s attracting attention now for table wines (as it has been for the last 20–30 years in the Douro), appreciated not just for its undisputed quality potential but its heat tolerance. It goes very well with venison (I had it with haunch steaks flavoured with juniper, rosemary and orange zest and deglazed with tawny port, a spot of redcurrant jelly and crème fraiche) and would also suit lamb, barbary duck, meaty sausages, casseroles or black bean dishes.
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- Joanna Simon

The Times

Smoky, wild sloe-scented, top red Douro grape rerouted to Langhorne Creek and McLaren Vale. - Jane MacQuitty

Wine-pages.com

Portugal's great grape transported to South Australia, and this really emphasises floral, violet and old roses perfume of the touriga nacional, some buoyant red fruits and a little cinnamon spice ...
Portugal's great grape transported to South Australia, and this really emphasises floral, violet and old roses perfume of the touriga nacional, some buoyant red fruits and a little cinnamon spice too. In the mouth substantial and creamy, lots of ripeness and juiciness, but a black fruit gloss and weight. My favourite wine of this small sample, with some substance without weight, and the balance of sweet and supple fruit, tannin and acid is excellent.
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- Tom Cannavan

Sunday Express

This is a famous Portuguese variety, and here it's been used to fashion a vivid, fresh and intense red wine. Fruity with a hint of pepper spice.

- Jamie Goode

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