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Crémant d’Alsace Cuvée Julien Dopff au Moulin NV

Sparkling Wine from France - Alsace
A Wine Champion in 2021 offering ‘real value at this level’ (Joanna Locke MW), this well-aged traditional Alsace fizz from the historic Dopff au Moulin estate turned heads with its delicate yellow-plum and apple fruit flavours. A lively and lovely blend featuring pinot blanc and auxerrois.
Price: £13.95 Bottle
Price: £83.50 Case of 6
Low stock
Code: SG321

Wine characteristics

  • Sparkling Wine
  • Dry
  • Pinot Blanc
  • 12% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • 75cl
  • Champagne cork

Alsace

The region of Alsace lies in the rain shadow of the Vosge mountains in north-eastern France, divided from Germany by the mighty Rhine River. With the Vosge peaks protecting it from prevailing, rain laden westerlies it is one of the driest and sunniest parts of France outside of the far south and is a wonderful place to grow grapes.

However, the wines of Alsace are sadly still often misunderstood. Their Germanic names, flute-shaped bottles, reminiscent of their Rhine and Mosel counterparts, and diversity of styles have all caused confusion and doubt in the minds of those consumers unfamiliar with them. Furthermore the pursuit of quality through lower yields and later harvests has come with higher levels of sweetness in many wines, though most are dry and eminently suitable for drinking with food.

In contrast to many French regions, Alsace labels are relatively easy to read for many a modern wine drinker, showing as they do the grape variety clearly. There are some multi-grape blends too, ...
The region of Alsace lies in the rain shadow of the Vosge mountains in north-eastern France, divided from Germany by the mighty Rhine River. With the Vosge peaks protecting it from prevailing, rain laden westerlies it is one of the driest and sunniest parts of France outside of the far south and is a wonderful place to grow grapes.

However, the wines of Alsace are sadly still often misunderstood. Their Germanic names, flute-shaped bottles, reminiscent of their Rhine and Mosel counterparts, and diversity of styles have all caused confusion and doubt in the minds of those consumers unfamiliar with them. Furthermore the pursuit of quality through lower yields and later harvests has come with higher levels of sweetness in many wines, though most are dry and eminently suitable for drinking with food.

In contrast to many French regions, Alsace labels are relatively easy to read for many a modern wine drinker, showing as they do the grape variety clearly. There are some multi-grape blends too, and give or take some pinot noir production almost all the wines are white. The hierarchy of appellations is simple to understand too, with AC Vin d’Alsace, Alsace Grand Cru and AC Cremant d’Alsace for sparkling wines being all you need to know.

Vendange Tardive and Sélection des Grains Nobles are two further designations within those classifications for wines made from later-harvested grapes that are higher in sugar and wines made from grapes affected by botrytis (aka noble rot) respectively.

Grand cru wines must be made with grapes from a named vineyard site of that designation harvested at lower yields than those permitted for AC Vin d’Alsace wines. Though they are not all equal in terms of quality and many were granted such status to satisfy local political demands, many of these sites are producing some of the greatest wines of the region. There are about 50 such grand cru sites in Alsace and wines from these sites can only be made from four noble varieties – riesling, muscat, pinot gris and gewurztraminer – though the grand cru vineyards themselves can be planted with any permitted variety.

Curiously, though, it is often the producer name and brand that is considered of higher importance than cru, and some producers do not use the name of a grand cru vineyard on the labels of wines made from those sites. Different producers are known for their house styles and it is often this, and the trusted quality of their ‘brands’, that attracts the savvy drinker.

The grape varieties are varied. Gewurztraminer is a grape that divides people into those who love it and those who hate it. Highly aromatic, with scents of lychee, rose petals and spice (gewürz is the German word for spice), sometimes very dry and sometimes richly sweet, gewurztraminer from Alsace can accommodate many difficult food pairings. They include Thai and other aromatic Asian foods, ginger-infused foods, and washed rind cheeses such as Munster.

Muscat, so often made to be sweet in other regions, is nearly always bone dry in Alsace. Perfumed and grapy, muscat makes an excellent aperitif and partner to asparagus.

Pinot blanc is an excellent everyday wine, not so aromatic, clean and round and often blended with auxerrois with which it share a similarly clean scent and flavour profile.

Pinot gris produces full, rich wines, less spicy than gewurztraminer and capable of long ageing. It can be a superb match for food, particularly roast goose, smoked fish, Oriental dishes and a varied cheeseboard.

Sylvaner is now an endangered species, being superseded by other varieties. It makes lively, refreshing whites with good acidity that in the best examples can age surprisingly gracefully. It is often drunk with food in Alsace restaurants, particularly onion tart, ham, bacon and pork.

Riesling is, for many cognoscenti, the region’s greatest wine. Here it produces dry, fuller-bodied styles with more rounded acidity. Like its lighter, often sweeter German counterparts, it develops great complexity with age, taking on its distinctive petrol aroma.

The red pinot noir grape ripens easily in Alsace and more and more wines are being made, with more substance, colour and aroma than their historical forbears. Some from the best producers are showing the ability to age well.

Please see our How to Buy Alsace Guide in the Wine World & News section of our website for a more detailed feature on the Alsace region.
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Dopff au Moulin

The history of making sparkling wine in Alsace is relatively short. It was Julien Dopff who became intrigued by the possibilities of making sparkling wines after seeing a demonstration of the Champenois method of production at the Paris Universal Exhibition in 1900, and he pioneered the first Crémant d’Alsace a couple of years later. It was a great idea and one that took root. It has since become an important part of the Alsace wine industry, and largely thanks to the Dopff family.

The Dopffs have been in Riquewihr since the 17th century, first as coopers and then as winemakers from the middle of the 19th century when Jean Dopff took up that profession. Since that time the family have built up their domaine in and around the impossibly attractive Alsace village of Riquewihr.

It is now Etienne-Arnaud Dopff who, with his wife Marlene, is working hard at the domaine to enhance the reputation earned by their forbears. They own 70 hectares of vines, mostly around Riquewihr itself, on south facing slopes on the Schoenenbourg where riesling is king. They also hold land in Hunawihr, Mittelwihr, the Hardt of Colmar and Brand at Turckheim. As well as making wine from their own vines they are one of the largest négociant businesses in Alsace, buying grapes from over 600 growers.

Pinot blanc is the mainstay of sparkling wine production here, supported by pinot auxerrois, pinot noir and chardonnay, and whole, hand-picked bunches are gently pressed. Only the free run juice is used, and the ...
The history of making sparkling wine in Alsace is relatively short. It was Julien Dopff who became intrigued by the possibilities of making sparkling wines after seeing a demonstration of the Champenois method of production at the Paris Universal Exhibition in 1900, and he pioneered the first Crémant d’Alsace a couple of years later. It was a great idea and one that took root. It has since become an important part of the Alsace wine industry, and largely thanks to the Dopff family.

The Dopffs have been in Riquewihr since the 17th century, first as coopers and then as winemakers from the middle of the 19th century when Jean Dopff took up that profession. Since that time the family have built up their domaine in and around the impossibly attractive Alsace village of Riquewihr.

It is now Etienne-Arnaud Dopff who, with his wife Marlene, is working hard at the domaine to enhance the reputation earned by their forbears. They own 70 hectares of vines, mostly around Riquewihr itself, on south facing slopes on the Schoenenbourg where riesling is king. They also hold land in Hunawihr, Mittelwihr, the Hardt of Colmar and Brand at Turckheim. As well as making wine from their own vines they are one of the largest négociant businesses in Alsace, buying grapes from over 600 growers.

Pinot blanc is the mainstay of sparkling wine production here, supported by pinot auxerrois, pinot noir and chardonnay, and whole, hand-picked bunches are gently pressed. Only the free run juice is used, and the initial fermentation is in stainless steel before the wine is fermented a second time in bottle, the so called méthode traditionnelle. The bottles are stored for a further 14 to 24 months before disgorgement, after which they have another period in the cellars before they are ready to leave. The Cuvée Julien, familiar to members of The Society, is generally a blend of 50% pinot blanc and 50% auxerrois.
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Decanter

Behind this unpromising label you will find a rather delicious wine. Floral aromas give way to ripe peach and pear fruit, along with a bready note and a long tangy finish in this attractive French...
Behind this unpromising label you will find a rather delicious wine. Floral aromas give way to ripe peach and pear fruit, along with a bready note and a long tangy finish in this attractive French fizz. 
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- Susie Barrie MW

Newcastle Journal

For a taste of whatAlsace can do [in sparkling wine, this] is an excellent starting point… themethod of production is exactly the same as Champagne. The difference? Apartfrom the fact that this is...
For a taste of whatAlsace can do [in sparkling wine, this] is an excellent starting point… themethod of production is exactly the same as Champagne. The difference? Apartfrom the fact that this is much cheaper, it's a bit fruitier in a peachy sortof way with rather softer acidity. And it's lovely.
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- Helen Savage

The Field

Deliciously drinkablefrom the ever-brilliant Wine Society.

- Jonathan Ray

Sunday Express

Alsace makes somedelightful sparkling wines, and this one is crisp, focused and linear with nicepear and citrus fruit. It's fruity and delicious with a hint of seriousness.

- Jamie Goode

The Daily Mail

I am becoming moreand more impressed with Alsatian sparklers and they are a viable alternative todreary Prosecco and soapy Cava!  This one is a beauty, made from PinotBlanc and Auxerrois and it has a ...
I am becoming moreand more impressed with Alsatian sparklers and they are a viable alternative todreary Prosecco and soapy Cava!  This one is a beauty, made from PinotBlanc and Auxerrois and it has a suave, creamy palate and ultra-fine bubbles. It’s a great price, too, so load up for elegant sparkling joy.
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- Matthew Jukes

Decanter

A blend of pinotblanc and auxerrois from the pioneers of sparkling wine in Alsace. A finebalance of sweet/sharp flavours. A well-made crowd pleaser.

- Sue Style

The Sunday Times

Head beyond Champagneinto Alsace and you will find fresh, crisp, zesty sparkling wine that’s greatto serve at summer parties. This is one such delightfully drinkable example.

- Will Lyons

The Independent

[A] typical andterrific buy… a blend of auxerrois and pinot blanc and very typical of therefreshing and utterly irresistible crémant style; for celebrations and partiesof all kinds.

- Terry Kirby

The Independent

Crémant – alongsidefantastic rieslings and pinot noirs – is a speciality of tucked away Alsace, inthe northeast of France and produces lovely wines such as [this], made frompinot blanc...
Crémant – alongsidefantastic rieslings and pinot noirs – is a speciality of tucked away Alsace, inthe northeast of France and produces lovely wines such as [this], made frompinot blanc and the local auxerrois grape and given a little complexity fromlees aging. It’s also perfectly priced between cheapo prosecco and the cheaperchampagnes. A great all-purpose summer sparkler.
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- Terry Kirby

Decanter

Recommended: Poised, elegant and expressive. Nicemousse and a touch of stone fruit on the palate. Decent.

- Panel tasting

The Spectator

<span style='font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB;...
<span style='font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA;'><font color="#000000">I used to drinkbuckets of this but for some reason hadn't seen it in a while. More fool me forone sip proved it's better than ever and superb value. A champagne method blendof pinot blanc and auxerrois, it spends two years on the lees and is deeply enticing.Fresh, crisp, clean, with a teasing underlying creaminess, it's surely the bestfizz around for the money. - </font></span>
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Jonathan Ray

Decanter

A 50/50 blend of pinot blanc and auxerrois, this traditional-method fizz spends at least 24 months on lees. Fresh and floral with hints of pear. Dopff au Moulin pioneered Crémant d'Alsace in the...
A 50/50 blend of pinot blanc and auxerrois, this traditional-method fizz spends at least 24 months on lees. Fresh and floral with hints of pear. Dopff au Moulin pioneered Crémant d'Alsace in the early 20th century, and has it down to a fine art. -
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Amy Wislocki

Decanter

The flagship bottle from this Crémant d'Alsace pioneer. An equal blend of pinot blanc and auxerrois has lemon, brioche and almond notes on the nose, the palate lively with a crisp apple bite...
The flagship bottle from this Crémant d'Alsace pioneer. An equal blend of pinot blanc and auxerrois has lemon, brioche and almond notes on the nose, the palate lively with a crisp apple bite making a nice impact. Some creamy flavours come in on the mid-palate, giving another level of complexity and interest. Lot's to like, great value. -
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Georgina Hindle

Club Oenologique

‘I recommend [this wine]. I’m from Alsace and miss not being able to travel to my place to see my family and friends, who are still waiting for me. Plus, bubbles are always welcome for any...
‘I recommend [this wine]. I’m from Alsace and miss not being able to travel to my place to see my family and friends, who are still waiting for me. Plus, bubbles are always welcome for any celebration.’
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- Eric Zweibel MS

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