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Domaine Bruno Clair, Savigny-lès-Beaune Premier Cru La Dominode 2013

Red Wine from France - Burgundy
A substantial parcel of the original 1902 planting has now been replaced, so the average age of the vines is about 30 years. The younger vines have sweeter tannins than the old and so this is more succulent, more typical Savigny than before. Only 15hl-ha were produced due to hail.
Original price: £48.00 Sale price: £39.00 Bottle
Original price: £288.00 Sale price: £234.00 Case of 6
Low stock
Code: BU58461

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Medium-bodied
  • Pinot Noir
  • 13% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Now to 2024
  • 75cl
  • Cork, natural

Côte de Beaune

The Côte de Beaune runs from Ladoix-Serrigny in the north to Cheilly lè Maranges in the south, on the southern escarpment of the Côte d’Or. Beaune is the town at its heart. The most famous wines of the area are white, but many excellent reds are produced.

The soils of the area are predominantly mixtures of clay and limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The hillsides here, split and riven by streams and side-valleys, provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as various aspects ranging from east-facing to south and south-west facing. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle. Soils with more limestone suit chardonnay more than pinot, hence the number of famous white burgundies produced...
The Côte de Beaune runs from Ladoix-Serrigny in the north to Cheilly lè Maranges in the south, on the southern escarpment of the Côte d’Or. Beaune is the town at its heart. The most famous wines of the area are white, but many excellent reds are produced.

The soils of the area are predominantly mixtures of clay and limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The hillsides here, split and riven by streams and side-valleys, provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as various aspects ranging from east-facing to south and south-west facing. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle. Soils with more limestone suit chardonnay more than pinot, hence the number of famous white burgundies produced here.

The climate here is semi-continental, though northerly winds can temper a hot summer while warmer winds from the south can bring warmth. Westerly winds that ultimately originate in the Atlantic can bring rain but at its worst may deliver devastating hail in incredibly localised storms. There is a degree of unpredictability about vintages in Burgundy.

Pinot noir and chardonnay are the two permitted grapes of any significance, though Aligoté is grown occasionally for crisp, mouth-watering whites that are often used to make kir, and some generic Bourgogne or Crémant can be made with pinot blanc, pinot gris and beurrot can be made.

The appellations to be found in the Côte de Beaune are as follows: Ladoix, Pernand-Vergelesses, Aloxe-Corton , Corton, Corton-Charlemagne, Chorey-lès-Beaune, Savigny-lès Beaune, Beaune, Pommard, Volnay, Monthélie, Auxey-Duresses, Saint-Romain, Meursault, Saint-Aubin, Puligny-Montrachet, Chassagne-Montrachet, Santenay and Maranges

Côte de Beaune-Villages and Bourgogne-Hautes Côtes de Beaune are also made. The former is solely for red wines and the latter includes some whites as well. Both are mostly from vineyards on the top of the escarpment and some represent good value for early drinking Burgundy.

Côte de Beaune wines are generally lighter than those from the Côte de Nuits. Beaunes are soft and round, Volnays fine and silky. Pommards are the exception: due to more clay in the soil, they can be notably tannic and in need of considerable bottle age. The greatest of all white Burgundies, Le Montrachet, is made here between Chassagne and Puligny.
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Domaine Bruno Clair

Bruno Clair began on his own in 1979 when his father's famous Domaine Clair-Dau was fragmented as a result of family disagreements and France’s Napoleonic inheritance laws. Bruno began with plots in Marsannay and Fixin, a small parcel in Savigny-Les-Beaune and a fallow plot that needed replanting in Morey-Saint-Denis, upon which he established an excellent reputation. By 1985 the parts of the old estates which had been retained by his family were in disarray and the various members asked Bruno to take control which he gladly did, adding vines in Clos de Bèze, Cazetiers, Clos-Saint-Jacques, Vosne-Romanée, Clos de Fonteny and Chambolle-Musigny to the portfolio. During the 1990s purchases of land in Corton-Charlemagne, Pernand-Vergelesses, Aloxe-Corton, and Gevrey-Chambertin Petite Chapelle further enhanced the holdings under his command and brought the total area to 23 hectares.

Not only does Domaine Bruno Clair have a prestigious portfolio but it also has an enviable selection of clones, pioneered by his father and developed by Bruno during careful observation in the vineyards. In his work he is aided by his close friend and valued colleague Philippe Brun, who has been with him from the very beginning.

The viticulture throughout is built on organic principles though without seeking certification in order that any particularly difficult vintages can be treated as a last resort. However, yields are kept low through painstaking work and everything is hand-harvested and sorted in ...
Bruno Clair began on his own in 1979 when his father's famous Domaine Clair-Dau was fragmented as a result of family disagreements and France’s Napoleonic inheritance laws. Bruno began with plots in Marsannay and Fixin, a small parcel in Savigny-Les-Beaune and a fallow plot that needed replanting in Morey-Saint-Denis, upon which he established an excellent reputation. By 1985 the parts of the old estates which had been retained by his family were in disarray and the various members asked Bruno to take control which he gladly did, adding vines in Clos de Bèze, Cazetiers, Clos-Saint-Jacques, Vosne-Romanée, Clos de Fonteny and Chambolle-Musigny to the portfolio. During the 1990s purchases of land in Corton-Charlemagne, Pernand-Vergelesses, Aloxe-Corton, and Gevrey-Chambertin Petite Chapelle further enhanced the holdings under his command and brought the total area to 23 hectares.

Not only does Domaine Bruno Clair have a prestigious portfolio but it also has an enviable selection of clones, pioneered by his father and developed by Bruno during careful observation in the vineyards. In his work he is aided by his close friend and valued colleague Philippe Brun, who has been with him from the very beginning.

The viticulture throughout is built on organic principles though without seeking certification in order that any particularly difficult vintages can be treated as a last resort. However, yields are kept low through painstaking work and everything is hand-harvested and sorted in the vineyards. Reds are partially destemmed prior to fermentation through the action of natural yeasts in open wooden vats for up to three weeks before seeing time in oak. The amount of new oak each wine sees depend on its designation within the hierarchy.

White grapes are gently pressed and the juice fermented again through the use of natural yeasts in oak barrels with batonnage. Thee whites then spend between 16 and 20 months in 20-50% new oak. The domaine also produces rosé in Marsannay as well as aligoté.
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Burgundy Vintage 2013

While there is much to enjoy in 2013, there was considerable weather variation and generalisations are difficult so sub regions are treated separately below.

In the Côte de Nuits succulent, fresh and lifted red wines were made with sweet but unobtrusive tannins and modest alcohol levels. There is enough structure here for mid to long-term maturation thanks to the small size of the crop and the protracted ripening time that the vines enjoyed. Also significant was the preponderance of millerandage, when berries remain small after flowering, which means there is a higher ratio of skin to pulp and few if any pips.

The Côte de Beaune was variable due to hail. As with the Côte de Nuits poor flowering also affected the crop, but it was the hail that caused devastation on 23rd July, in a swathe from Ladoix to Meursault. It has led to losses between 40-100% but overall has meant a halving of the crop. However, there was enough time for some leaves to grow and there was time for damaged grapes...
While there is much to enjoy in 2013, there was considerable weather variation and generalisations are difficult so sub regions are treated separately below.

In the Côte de Nuits succulent, fresh and lifted red wines were made with sweet but unobtrusive tannins and modest alcohol levels. There is enough structure here for mid to long-term maturation thanks to the small size of the crop and the protracted ripening time that the vines enjoyed. Also significant was the preponderance of millerandage, when berries remain small after flowering, which means there is a higher ratio of skin to pulp and few if any pips.

The Côte de Beaune was variable due to hail. As with the Côte de Nuits poor flowering also affected the crop, but it was the hail that caused devastation on 23rd July, in a swathe from Ladoix to Meursault. It has led to losses between 40-100% but overall has meant a halving of the crop. However, there was enough time for some leaves to grow and there was time for damaged grapes to drop and wounds on the vine to heal and still allow time for the fruit remaining to ripen. Reds are fresh and vibrant, and this is a vintage to trade up to premier cru for the greater ripeness that such sites can achieve. Whites in the Côte de Beaune can be lovely, with moderate alcohols and a fresh mineral style. Saint-Aubin, Chassagne, Puligny and Meursault all performed well.

In Chablis the best wines were made from grapes picked before the storm of 5th and 6th October. Those that picked thus have made taut, firm and mineral wines that are classic Chablis. Some who picked after the storm suffered from attacks of botrytis and though a little of such an infection can add a honeyed nuance to the wines too much, can override the subtleties and minerality that one looks for in good Chablis.

Mâcon performed very well in 2013. There were fewer problems of flowering, no hail and only a small amount of botrytis after the storms. There are well-balanced, ripe but fresh whites.
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2013 vintage reviews

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