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Domaine Drouhin-Laroze, Latricières-Chambertin Grand Cru 2018

Red Wine from France - Burgundy
Lovely freshness for the year, with lively red-fruit character and impressive length of flavour. This elegant wine comes from a vineyard cooled by air currents from the Combe de Grisard. 25% whole-bunch fermentation.
Price: £105.00 Bottle
Price: £315.00 Case of 3
Low stock
Code: BU74791

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Medium-bodied
  • Pinot Noir
  • 13% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • 2028 to 2036
  • 75cl
  • Cork, natural

Côte de Nuits

Taking its name from the town at its heart, Nuits-St-Georges, the Côte de Nuits is the northern half of the Côte d’Or, the escarpment upon which lie the greatest of Burgundy’s vineyards. Though there are a number of very fine white wines made it is the reds for which the Côte de Nuits is truly famous. Compared with the red wines of the Côte de Beaune the reds from Nuits have more sophisticated tannins, extra body and a more sumptuous texture than their southern counterparts.

The soils of the area are predominantly limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The finest have a happy conjunction of silt and scree over marl with protected and sunny aspects in some of the side-valleys that cut into the escarpment from west to east. These cuts provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as the various aspects. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile...
Taking its name from the town at its heart, Nuits-St-Georges, the Côte de Nuits is the northern half of the Côte d’Or, the escarpment upon which lie the greatest of Burgundy’s vineyards. Though there are a number of very fine white wines made it is the reds for which the Côte de Nuits is truly famous. Compared with the red wines of the Côte de Beaune the reds from Nuits have more sophisticated tannins, extra body and a more sumptuous texture than their southern counterparts.

The soils of the area are predominantly limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The finest have a happy conjunction of silt and scree over marl with protected and sunny aspects in some of the side-valleys that cut into the escarpment from west to east. These cuts provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as the various aspects. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle.

The climate here is semi-continental, though northerly winds can temper a hot summer while warmer winds from the south can bring warmth. Westerly winds that ultimately originate in the Atlantic can bring rain but at its worst may deliver devastating hail in incredibly localised storms. There is a degree of unpredictability about vintages in Burgundy that mean more variation than in any other fine wine region.

The appellations that sit above the generic regional ACs in the hierarchy are Marsannay, Fixin, Gevrey-Chambertin, Morey-St-Denis, Chambolle-Musigny, Vougeot, Vosne-Romanée, Echézaux and Nuits-St-George. Côte de Nuits –Villages is made from grapes grown at either end of the Côte, where the soils and sites are less impressive. Gevrey-Chambertin is a complete and balanced wine, full and harmonious. Wines from Nuits-St-Georges are the most tannic and, like Pommards, need long maturation. For many Vosne-Romanée is the summit. Its wines have beautiful velvety palates: dense and soft, sensuous and tactile. Chambolle-Musigny is the lightest yet one of the most fragrant wines of the Côte de Nuits. It is perhaps Nuits's equivalent of Volnay; a pretty, fine boned wine with exquisite perfume and a silky palate.
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Domaine Drouhin-Laroze

Douhin-Laroze was founded around 1850 and has always been owned by the family. It was begun by a Laroze, before in 1919 Suzanne Laroze married Alexandre Drouhin (who owned vines in Chambolle-Musigny) and gave the domaine the name it retains to this day.

Philippe Drouhin took over from his father Bernard in 2001 and the quality of the wines has since catapulted the domaine into the top flight. Their 11-hectares includes the grands crus of Bonnes Mares (1.49 hectares), a tiny bit of Musigny, 1.47 hectares of Chambertin Clos de Bèze, a fraction over a hectare of Clos de Vougeot and half a hectare or so each of Latricières-Chambertin and Chapelle-Chambertin. In addition, there are also Gevrey premiers crus in Lavaux St Jacques and Clos Prieur and they also make lovely village Gevrey.

The classic style of vinification is much aided by the domaine’s magnificent two-storey cellars which were constructed in 1815 and provide the ideal conditions for the maturation of the wines. After fermentation the wine is run off into barrels in the top cellar, which, being less deep, is subject to useful seasonal temperature variation which is put to use in the maturation of the wine. The cool autumn temperatures in continental Burgundy help naturally to clarify the wine and prevent the start of the malolactic fermentation which Burgundians like to delay. As temperatures rise the following spring the malo begins. The previous year’s wine in the bottom cellar is bottled between February and April ...
Douhin-Laroze was founded around 1850 and has always been owned by the family. It was begun by a Laroze, before in 1919 Suzanne Laroze married Alexandre Drouhin (who owned vines in Chambolle-Musigny) and gave the domaine the name it retains to this day.

Philippe Drouhin took over from his father Bernard in 2001 and the quality of the wines has since catapulted the domaine into the top flight. Their 11-hectares includes the grands crus of Bonnes Mares (1.49 hectares), a tiny bit of Musigny, 1.47 hectares of Chambertin Clos de Bèze, a fraction over a hectare of Clos de Vougeot and half a hectare or so each of Latricières-Chambertin and Chapelle-Chambertin. In addition, there are also Gevrey premiers crus in Lavaux St Jacques and Clos Prieur and they also make lovely village Gevrey.

The classic style of vinification is much aided by the domaine’s magnificent two-storey cellars which were constructed in 1815 and provide the ideal conditions for the maturation of the wines. After fermentation the wine is run off into barrels in the top cellar, which, being less deep, is subject to useful seasonal temperature variation which is put to use in the maturation of the wine. The cool autumn temperatures in continental Burgundy help naturally to clarify the wine and prevent the start of the malolactic fermentation which Burgundians like to delay. As temperatures rise the following spring the malo begins. The previous year’s wine in the bottom cellar is bottled between February and April leaving space for the new wine. After the malo has finished the wines are racked into barrels in the lower cellar whose constant temperature is ideal for a further year’s maturation in barrel, after which the wine is bottled.

Phillipe's son Nicolas is gradually taking over from his father now. He began working in the vineyard limiting the vines to eight bunches per plant. He is now influencing the vinification and adjusting the fine tuning. He has changed extraction methods from a dominance of punching down to what he sees as a more gentle action of pumping over to improve the quality of the tannins. The use of new oak for maturation has been reduced (the premiers crus now get 50% and grands crus have been reduced from 100% to 70%).
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2018 vintage reviews

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