Domaine Sylvain Pataille, Marsannay Rosé Fleur de Pinot 2019 is no longer available

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Domaine Sylvain Pataille, Marsannay Rosé Fleur de Pinot 2019

Rose Wine from France - Burgundy
A serious rosé from Burgundy kept for 12 to 16 months in 500-litre barrels before bottling. It has aromas of strawberries and cherries and a fine and structured palate. It also keeps well.
is no longer available
Code: BU78641

Wine characteristics

  • Rose Wine
  • Dry
  • Pinot Noir
  • 0% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • 2022 to 2027
  • 75cl
  • Cork, natural

Côte de Nuits

Taking its name from the town at its heart, Nuits-St-Georges, the Côte de Nuits is the northern half of the Côte d’Or, the escarpment upon which lie the greatest of Burgundy’s vineyards. Though there are a number of very fine white wines made it is the reds for which the Côte de Nuits is truly famous. Compared with the red wines of the Côte de Beaune the reds from Nuits have more sophisticated tannins, extra body and a more sumptuous texture than their southern counterparts.

The soils of the area are predominantly limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The finest have a happy conjunction of silt and scree over marl with protected and sunny aspects in some of the side-valleys that cut into the escarpment from west to east. These cuts provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as the various aspects. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile...
Taking its name from the town at its heart, Nuits-St-Georges, the Côte de Nuits is the northern half of the Côte d’Or, the escarpment upon which lie the greatest of Burgundy’s vineyards. Though there are a number of very fine white wines made it is the reds for which the Côte de Nuits is truly famous. Compared with the red wines of the Côte de Beaune the reds from Nuits have more sophisticated tannins, extra body and a more sumptuous texture than their southern counterparts.

The soils of the area are predominantly limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The finest have a happy conjunction of silt and scree over marl with protected and sunny aspects in some of the side-valleys that cut into the escarpment from west to east. These cuts provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as the various aspects. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle.

The climate here is semi-continental, though northerly winds can temper a hot summer while warmer winds from the south can bring warmth. Westerly winds that ultimately originate in the Atlantic can bring rain but at its worst may deliver devastating hail in incredibly localised storms. There is a degree of unpredictability about vintages in Burgundy that mean more variation than in any other fine wine region.

The appellations that sit above the generic regional ACs in the hierarchy are Marsannay, Fixin, Gevrey-Chambertin, Morey-St-Denis, Chambolle-Musigny, Vougeot, Vosne-Romanée, Echézaux and Nuits-St-George. Côte de Nuits –Villages is made from grapes grown at either end of the Côte, where the soils and sites are less impressive. Gevrey-Chambertin is a complete and balanced wine, full and harmonious. Wines from Nuits-St-Georges are the most tannic and, like Pommards, need long maturation. For many Vosne-Romanée is the summit. Its wines have beautiful velvety palates: dense and soft, sensuous and tactile. Chambolle-Musigny is the lightest yet one of the most fragrant wines of the Côte de Nuits. It is perhaps Nuits's equivalent of Volnay; a pretty, fine boned wine with exquisite perfume and a silky palate.
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Domaine Sylvain Pataille

Sylvain Pataille is an exciting young grower in Marsannay. He trained as an oenologist in Bordeaux, and still consults to 15 or so domaines in Burgundy. His family had 4ha of vines in 1905, but lost them during difficult financial times. He began in 2001 with 4ha and now has 14ha mainly en fermage, on 25 year rental agreements, which are undergoing conversion to biodynamic cultivation. He makes white from aligoté and a selection of chardonnay rosé, whose skin turns pink when ripe, as well as rosé and red. He aims for very low yields in the reds of 35hl/ha.

Burgundy Vintage 2019

The defining character of the 2019 Burgundies is their extraordinary concentration and balance. Made from very low yields (approximately half a crop for whites, and 70% of a normal crop for reds), their density and intensity of flavour are seldom seen. The vintage is superb in both colours. Geographically and hierarchically there is widespread success.

Although this was statistically a very warm year, the flavours are within the normal Burgundian register. Some mitigating factors, outlined later, attempt to explain this.

The character of each terroir is preserved. Like all vintages of high maturity, the lesser vineyards which struggle to ripen in a cool year have done proportionately better, but not to the extent that the quality hierarchy is upset. There are some exceptional village wines this year. However, to be clear, these are very good but are not better than premiers crus. Some of the wines will be approachable young but will keep very well. However, I think these wines are...
The defining character of the 2019 Burgundies is their extraordinary concentration and balance. Made from very low yields (approximately half a crop for whites, and 70% of a normal crop for reds), their density and intensity of flavour are seldom seen. The vintage is superb in both colours. Geographically and hierarchically there is widespread success.

Although this was statistically a very warm year, the flavours are within the normal Burgundian register. Some mitigating factors, outlined later, attempt to explain this.

The character of each terroir is preserved. Like all vintages of high maturity, the lesser vineyards which struggle to ripen in a cool year have done proportionately better, but not to the extent that the quality hierarchy is upset. There are some exceptional village wines this year. However, to be clear, these are very good but are not better than premiers crus. Some of the wines will be approachable young but will keep very well. However, I think these wines are worth keeping in order to develop their full potential.

The only character that shows this is a year of high maturity is the alcohol levels, which are a little higher than usual. There are commonly between 13.5 and 14% and there are rare cases of wines at 14.5%. However, there is so much fruit concentration that one is virtually never aware of it.

I really like the 2019 vintage. These are dense and powerful wines, yet they have a certain tension. I think all Burgundy lovers, and especially those beginning their Burgundy journey, will enjoy them. Their concentrated flavours make them very approachable. Burgundy can make wines like this with controlled power, or more delicate wines in cooler years. The joy is to be found in the variety and uniqueness of each vintage. However, if you like very austere and delicate wines, these wines may not be for you.


White wines
It is difficult to go wrong in 2019. The whites are mineral and appley, and occasionally they reach into the white peach register. Only a few wines show very ripe characters and virtually never are they in the exotic, honeyed spectrum. The perceived acidity is fresh due to the relatively low pHs for this level of maturity. Again, it’s the concentration which is exceptional. I think the Chablis grands crus are remarkably good this year. All the grands crus are situated together on a hillside particularly rich in Kimmeridgian clay, which retains water, beneficial in a warm year, and gives structure to the wines which supports the concentrated fruit.

Value for money: the Mậconnais, Chalonnais wines like Montagny and entry-level Chablis remain good value. In terms of growers, look to Prudhon and Jean-Marc Vincent.


Red wines
These are uniformly good too. The quality of tannins in remarkably good. They are soft and suave in character. They wines have a mix of red and black fruit with no jamminess or raisiny flavours. The perceived acidity is fresh due to the relatively low pHs for this level of maturity.

I think it’s a very good year for village wines, and villages with clay soils. Village Nuits-Saint-Georges from Domaine de Bellene and Jean Chauvenet are exceptionally rich and dense with sweet tannins. Village Gevrey-Chambertins from Maume, Tawse and Mortet are outstanding and new supplier Lécheneaut have a very successful line-up of village wines. Cooler vineyards like Pernand-Vergelesses, or appellations with clay soils like Nuits and Pommard are also very successful.

Value for money: I think Marsannay, from both Sylvain Pataille and Château de Marsannay, offers great value for money, along with the lesser wines from Domaine de Bellene and Jadot, and the wines of Jean-Marc Vincent.


The weather
A frost on 5th April and a few hailstorms reduced the crop severely. Some poor weather at flowering further reduced the crop and caused millerandage (‘hens and chickens’) and coulure (shot berries). Apart from that, it is was generally an easy vintage for the growers with little disease. The small crop and warm weather produced the concentrated grapes which characterise the year.


A paradoxically well-balanced year: mitigating factors

Heat and drought
2019 was a year of variable temperatures, some heatwaves and some lows and some very dry spells. The timing of the heat was important as some of it did not directly translate into ripeness. Warm weather before véraison (grape colour change) has only a small effect on flavour ripeness. So the hot weather in February and March, before the vines had even flowered, advanced the cycle but did not directly affect the ripening of the grapes.

Heatwaves occurred in June and July where the temperature reached 40°C. But above about 30°C the vine goes into survival mode and shuts down. Because water is evaporating faster from its leaves than it can pump water from its reserves, it closes its leaf stomata to preserve its water and help it survive. Ripening
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2019 vintage reviews
2017 vintage reviews
2016 vintage reviews

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