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Half bottle of Stanton and Killeen Rutherglen Muscat, 12 Years Old

Other Fortified from Australia - Victoria
For the third consecutive year this treacly Aussie treat soared from the glass and into our Championship line-up for 2020. Very sweet but never cloying, rich but finely balanced and full of deep, complex raisin flavours.
Price: £17.50 Half Bottle
Price: £210.00 Case of 12
In Stock
Code: AU10522

Wine characteristics

  • Other Fortified
  • Intensely sweet
  • Muscat
  • 18% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • 37.5cl (Half bottle)
  • Cork, natural

Victoria

Victoria is the southernmost state on the Australian mainland and contains within its borders a diverse collection of terroirs, perhaps the most varied within Australia. This diversity has helped the state to earn an enviable reputation for the quality of its wines, the areas that they hail from and its wineries.

It has a long history since the first settlers in the region planted vines, but the catalyst for expansion was the gold rush of the mid-19th century which saw many a vineyard established. This promising start was stalled dramatically by the arrival of phylloxera in the 1870’s and to this day the Victoria produce less than half the amount produced in neighbouring South Australia despite having many more vineyards.

Despite its small size (it is the smallest state other than Tasmania) it has an amazing diversity of terroirs, from the dry, torrid north-east where fortified wines are king, to the positively chilly by comparison Mornington Peninsula due south of Melbourne on the...
Victoria is the southernmost state on the Australian mainland and contains within its borders a diverse collection of terroirs, perhaps the most varied within Australia. This diversity has helped the state to earn an enviable reputation for the quality of its wines, the areas that they hail from and its wineries.

It has a long history since the first settlers in the region planted vines, but the catalyst for expansion was the gold rush of the mid-19th century which saw many a vineyard established. This promising start was stalled dramatically by the arrival of phylloxera in the 1870’s and to this day the Victoria produce less than half the amount produced in neighbouring South Australia despite having many more vineyards.

Despite its small size (it is the smallest state other than Tasmania) it has an amazing diversity of terroirs, from the dry, torrid north-east where fortified wines are king, to the positively chilly by comparison Mornington Peninsula due south of Melbourne on the coast. It also embraces a fair chunk of the Murray Darling region where irrigation makes the vast expanses of vineyard a possibility and from where three quarters of the state’s grape yield derives.

The Yarra Valley is a short car ride to the north of Melbourne, and has a wide selection of tourist diversions to prove it. It also has an array of excellent estates and vineyards at various elevations and in a variety of soils, from clay and sand to volcanic. Rediscovered in the 1960s and prized for its cool nights and warm, sunny days, it has become synonymous with excellent pinot noirs and elegant, intense chardonnays that are doing much to reclaim Australia’s reputation for the variety. Shiraz has also proved a success in a more restrained style.

To the south of Melbourne, and benefiting fully from an unrelenting oceanic influence on its doorstep is the Mornington Peninsula. Surrounded by the Southern Ocean and Port Phillip Bay on three sides, and moderated by the breezes these expanses of water generate the summer climate on the peninsula is for the most part temperate. This is a region of small estates producing some of the most elegant and refined pinot noirs in the new world let alone Australia. The soils vary from volcanic deposits to sandy clay and after pinot noir there is fine chardonnay and an increasing volume of pinot gris. Close to Melbourne the area of Geelong enjoys a windy, maritime climate but is slightly warmer, making plump pinot and some delicious shiraz and chardonnay.

In the north-east lies one of the great wine regions of Australia, though it is not shiraz, or chardonnay nor riesling for which it is famed, but rather the muscat grape, made into a fortified treasure that is unique to the area and which is one of Australia’s great vinous jewels. Rutherglen Liqueur Muscats, and Muscadelles, can hold their head up in the company of any great port, sherry or Madeira for their rich, complex, silky and concentrated character. The summers here are torrid, the landscape arid and the grapes full of sugar. And the red table wines made are dense, brooding examples that are improving all the time. But it is the joyous fortifieds that steal the show.
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Stanton & Killeen

North-east Victoria in Australia is famous for fortified wines and one of the family firms at the forefront of production there is Stanton & Killeen. The Stanton family are originally from Suffolk and had their beginnings in the wine trade, like many others, during the gold rush of the mid-18th century. In 1864 Timothy Stanton established a business supplying victuals to the miners and in 1875 sold the first vintage of his fortified wine. They have been producing their vinous gold ever since, through seven generations, and 2015 sees their 150th anniversary as winemakers.

In 1925 Jack Stanton built a new winery, in true pioneering spirit employing re-used materials, and in 1948 the Killeens joined the family when Norman Killeen married Joan Stanton. Until the 1960s the family produced nothing but fortified wines. That decade saw a brief pull back from wine as wool prices soared around the world and some of the vines were grubbed up, but the 1970s saw a renewed optimism in the Australian wine industry and the family were not slow to recognise it. These days red wines are also made but it is the fortifieds, which represent 70% of Stanton & Killeen's production, which are the flagship wines, and they are increasingly prized around the world.

Grapes come from some 86 hectares divided between eight vineyards, and the oldest vines are nearing a hundred years of age, basking in the hot continental climate of this region. In the area around the town of Rutherglen it is easy to ...
North-east Victoria in Australia is famous for fortified wines and one of the family firms at the forefront of production there is Stanton & Killeen. The Stanton family are originally from Suffolk and had their beginnings in the wine trade, like many others, during the gold rush of the mid-18th century. In 1864 Timothy Stanton established a business supplying victuals to the miners and in 1875 sold the first vintage of his fortified wine. They have been producing their vinous gold ever since, through seven generations, and 2015 sees their 150th anniversary as winemakers.

In 1925 Jack Stanton built a new winery, in true pioneering spirit employing re-used materials, and in 1948 the Killeens joined the family when Norman Killeen married Joan Stanton. Until the 1960s the family produced nothing but fortified wines. That decade saw a brief pull back from wine as wool prices soared around the world and some of the vines were grubbed up, but the 1970s saw a renewed optimism in the Australian wine industry and the family were not slow to recognise it. These days red wines are also made but it is the fortifieds, which represent 70% of Stanton & Killeen's production, which are the flagship wines, and they are increasingly prized around the world.

Grapes come from some 86 hectares divided between eight vineyards, and the oldest vines are nearing a hundred years of age, basking in the hot continental climate of this region. In the area around the town of Rutherglen it is easy to partly raisin the grapes on the vine, intensifying the sugars and flavours. To make their wonderful Liqueur Muscat, aromatic muscat blanc à petits grain grapes (known in Australia, with characteristic bluntness, as 'brown muscat') are harvested, crushed and fermented on the skins for just a day before the fermentation is stopped in its tracks with pure grape spirit. After clarification the wines spend two or three years in large old oak barrels until the best parcels are selected to spend a considerably longer time in smaller oak barrels until the desired style of wine is achieved. The process shares some similarities with madeira production in that heat plays a part in the maturation process by helping to concentrate the wines, and the Spanish solera system whereby older wines are blended with younger versions.

These rich, sweet and silky wines are unique to Australia, indeed to this corner of Australia, and they are one of the wine world's great treasures.
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Wine-pages.com

This is a gloriousMuscat made from an average of 12-year-old wines, with delicious lift andlightness aromatically, quite different from their neighbours, Campbells, withits leafier notes, but fabulous...
This is a gloriousMuscat made from an average of 12-year-old wines, with delicious lift andlightness aromatically, quite different from their neighbours, Campbells, withits leafier notes, but fabulous full richness (over 270g/l of residual sugar).Viscous and filled with sweet, dark and chocolaty flavours with that raisinlusciousness and good supporting acidity, this will take Christmas pud in itsstride.
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93/100 - Tom Cannavan

Kent & Sussex Courier

A magnificentlycomplex dessert fortified wine… liquid fruitcake… There is a cornucopia ofaromas and flavours here, including liqueured raisings, melted toffee andtinges of honeysuckle, dried ...
A magnificentlycomplex dessert fortified wine… liquid fruitcake… There is a cornucopia ofaromas and flavours here, including liqueured raisings, melted toffee andtinges of honeysuckle, dried fruit cake, marmalade and treacle. The strata offlavours are myriad, truly something that all winelovers should experience atleast once in their lives, with distinctive rancio and cut to the protractedfinish. Very sweet, crisp, rich and viscous, it's a spectacular sticky delightand one of Australia's wine treasures. Scrumptious served lightly chilled withRoquefort, rich chocolate tarts and dark and milk chocolate, half a bottle ofthis ingenious and super-concentrated wine really goes a long way.
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- James Viner

Scottish Field

No one does'stickies' like the Australians. This fortified wine is chock full of treacle,coffee and dried fruit flavours, making it an ideal match for either Christmaspudding or Christmas cake if...
No one does'stickies' like the Australians. This fortified wine is chock full of treacle,coffee and dried fruit flavours, making it an ideal match for either Christmaspudding or Christmas cake if you're looking for sweetness with the volumeturned up.
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- Peter Ranscombe

Scottish Field

'Unique' is a wordthat's overused in the drinks industry, but there's no other wine likeRutherglen Muscat. The grapes are left on the vine to shrivel up, concentratingthe remaining sugars. ...
'Unique' is a wordthat's overused in the drinks industry, but there's no other wine likeRutherglen Muscat. The grapes are left on the vine to shrivel up, concentratingthe remaining sugars. A very short fermentation leaves tons of sweetness,before the wines are left in oak barrels to mature in the Australian heat. Theresult is an ideal match for a sticky toffee pudding, with rich syrupy treacle,cinder toffee and caramel flavours.
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- Peter Ranscombe

Decanter

Decanter Gold 2017:Complex nose of roasted coffee, hazelnut, candied peel and macerated cherries.The sweetness is very prominent but in attractive balance with the appealingsavoury-sweet caramel flavours.

IWSC

Christmas pud? Mincepies?  Look no further than this glorious Muscat made from an average of12-year-old wines, with delicious lightness aromatically, with leafy notes butfabulous full richness (over...
Christmas pud? Mincepies?  Look no further than this glorious Muscat made from an average of12-year-old wines, with delicious lightness aromatically, with leafy notes butfabulous full richness (over 270g/l of residual sugar) on the palate. Viscousand filled with sweet, dark and chocolaty flavours with that raisinlusciousness and good supporting acidity, this will take all sweet thingsChristmassy in its stride.
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- Tom Cannavan

The Evening Standard

This is Christmas ina glass – full of sweet spice, raisin, fruit, coffee and nut flavours, allwrapped up in brown sugar. What’s not to like?

midweekwines.co.uk

Dessert wines can beone dimensional unless they include mitigating acidity. Happily, thisAustralian example does so yet still offers a density reminiscent perhaps of PXsherry.Enjoy, though, the deep, dark ...
Dessert wines can beone dimensional unless they include mitigating acidity. Happily, thisAustralian example does so yet still offers a density reminiscent perhaps of PXsherry.Enjoy, though, the deep, dark (yet perfumed) richness of [this wine] reflectednicely in its very sweet date and fig flavours and the suggestions of mocha andhoney that accompany them.
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- Brian Elliott

The Scotsman

At average 12 years, this older Classic style has rose petal notes, treacly, luscious, decadent sweetness; deep, long raisiny finish; well-priced Classic.

- Rose Murray Brown

Scottish Field

Stanton & Killeen’s 12 year old has chocolatey notes on the nose, with a luscious texture, and more dark chocolate wrapping around the peach and demerara sugar on the palate. These...
Stanton & Killeen’s 12 year old has chocolatey notes on the nose, with a luscious texture, and more dark chocolate wrapping around the peach and demerara sugar on the palate. These “Classic” Rutherglen muscats are now often being served with spicier dishes too; their sweetness lends itself to balancing hotter dishes. A great accompaniment to chocolate or toffee desserts too.
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- Peter Ranscombe

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