“Jeroboam of Moulin-à-Vent Clos du Grand Carquelin, Château des Jacques 2018 (3 litre)” is out of stock.

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Jeroboam of Moulin-à-Vent Clos du Grand Carquelin, Château des Jacques 2018 (3 litre)

Red Wine from France - Beaujolais
Refined Moulin-à-Vent with velvety texture and a smooth, polished finish. A generous Beaujolais displaying notes of wild cherries and a hint of coffee.
Out of stock
Code: BJ8025

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Full-bodied
  • Gamay
  • 13.5% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • 2022 to 2032
  • 300cl
  • Cork, natural

Beaujolais

At its best, there is little that can match Beaujolais' fragrant, sappy, fruity flavours. Beaujolais tends to be a delight to drink upon release; indeed, extolling the wines' youthful virtues has been hugely successful.

At one time more than half the crop of this region was hurriedly fermented and sold as Beaujolais Nouveau, released on the third Thursday of November and raced to market in as many inventive ways as possible. Its cheap price and fun image made it popular for a while but, inevitably, quality suffered and Nouveau fell out of fashion in the face of new world competition.

Away from Beaujolais Nouveau, another kind of Beaujolais continued to be made, often using very traditional methods of production and reflecting a complexity of terroir that still comes as something of a surprise.

Beaujolais lies between the towns of Mâcon and Lyon with most of the vineyard confusingly coming into the Département du Rhône. The vast majority of the region's 18,500 hectares ...

At its best, there is little that can match Beaujolais' fragrant, sappy, fruity flavours. Beaujolais tends to be a delight to drink upon release; indeed, extolling the wines' youthful virtues has been hugely successful.

At one time more than half the crop of this region was hurriedly fermented and sold as Beaujolais Nouveau, released on the third Thursday of November and raced to market in as many inventive ways as possible. Its cheap price and fun image made it popular for a while but, inevitably, quality suffered and Nouveau fell out of fashion in the face of new world competition.

Away from Beaujolais Nouveau, another kind of Beaujolais continued to be made, often using very traditional methods of production and reflecting a complexity of terroir that still comes as something of a surprise.

Beaujolais lies between the towns of Mâcon and Lyon with most of the vineyard confusingly coming into the Département du Rhône. The vast majority of the region's 18,500 hectares is planted with a single red grape: gamay, or to be more precise, gamay noir à jus blanc. Often densely planted to help control the vines vigour, and therefore yields, trained low and pruned hard, they are need at least a short spell of real heat to ripen properly. In terms of soil, gamay does not do well on sedimentary rock types. Much of Beaujolais is granite with outcrops of schist in part of Morgon or Andesites in the Cote de Brouilly.

A little over 200 hectares is planted with chardonnay, which is growing in popularity because it is easier to sell and can be turned into sparkling Cremant de Bourgogne. White Beaujolais is sold either as Beaujolais blanc or Beaujolais-Villages blanc, and the best comes areas with chalk in the soil.

Below is a list of the appellations, but it is worth mentioning that the most important factor in the wines' quality is the grower.

Beaujolais: Mostly from the south where the soils are often of a limestone called pierres dorées, which makes excellent building material. But there are granites as well and a great many styles of wine possible though a major part of the productions continues to be made as Nouveau.

Beaujolais-Villages: These wines come from the north and are set among the ten crus and planted on the same granitic soils. 38 parishes are allowed to produce Beaujolais-Villages. They offer a midway point between generic Beaujolais and the greater complexity of the crus.

The ten crus, from north to south, are: Saint-Amour, Juliénas, Chénas, Moulin-à-Vent, Fleurie, Chiroubles, Morgon, Regnié, Brouilly and Côte de Brouilly. Each have their own unique variation on the local geology and topography, climatic conditions and character; from the light, fragrant Chiroubles to the richer, more concentrated Moulin-à-Vent with its ability to age and comparison in great years with top Burgundies.

Within these crus are specific vineyards, or climats, with deserved reputations for high-quality, such as Poncié in Fleurie or Côte du Py in Morgon. For a more thorough examination of these crus and their characteristic traits please see our How to Buy Beaujolais guide in the Wine World & News section of our website.

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Château des Jacques

Château des Jacques' motto is 'a great wine is a living wine', and indeed this property's wines are some of the most long-lived in the entire Beaujolais region.

When Louis Jadot purchased the château in 1996, both cellars and vineyard were in sorry state and certainly in need of capital to bring them up to standard. The process has been long in the making and quite rightly has been much more evident in the vineyard.

At first, Château des Jacques was managed by Frédéric Burrier, who eventually left to return to his family estate at Beauregard in Fuissé. His place was then taken an old soldier, Guillaume de Castelnau, descendant of the victors of the first battle of the Marne. The aim was to restore this estate to former glories and in this they have been entirely successful. Part of the vineyard has been replanted and pruning has been shortened in order to minimise yields. Ploughing was brought back to give life to the soils and chemical fertilisers, insecticides and herbicides have been replaced by more natural solutions. The result has seen a dramatic rise in quality.

Though Château des Jacques produces wine from several Beaujolais appellations, it is Moulin-à-Vent which has captured the headlines. The estate is a large landowner here with scattered plots across the appellation. Moulin-à-Vent's geology is complex as though the soil is mostly granite, in fact there are variations with more clay in some, more stones and, uniquely in Beaujolais, greater or lesser amounts of...
Château des Jacques' motto is 'a great wine is a living wine', and indeed this property's wines are some of the most long-lived in the entire Beaujolais region.

When Louis Jadot purchased the château in 1996, both cellars and vineyard were in sorry state and certainly in need of capital to bring them up to standard. The process has been long in the making and quite rightly has been much more evident in the vineyard.

At first, Château des Jacques was managed by Frédéric Burrier, who eventually left to return to his family estate at Beauregard in Fuissé. His place was then taken an old soldier, Guillaume de Castelnau, descendant of the victors of the first battle of the Marne. The aim was to restore this estate to former glories and in this they have been entirely successful. Part of the vineyard has been replanted and pruning has been shortened in order to minimise yields. Ploughing was brought back to give life to the soils and chemical fertilisers, insecticides and herbicides have been replaced by more natural solutions. The result has seen a dramatic rise in quality.

Though Château des Jacques produces wine from several Beaujolais appellations, it is Moulin-à-Vent which has captured the headlines. The estate is a large landowner here with scattered plots across the appellation. Moulin-à-Vent's geology is complex as though the soil is mostly granite, in fact there are variations with more clay in some, more stones and, uniquely in Beaujolais, greater or lesser amounts of manganese. Moreover, exposition is different with some slopes facing fully south, others more south-east and at altitudes that may vary by some 1000 feet.

From the start, the plan for Jadot was to make single-vineyard wines, at least in good vintages and this they have done with Rochegrès at its richest and La Roche maybe at its finest. Jadot also produce a generic blend of the estate's Moulin-à-Vent.

Moulin-à-Vent is the weightiest in style of Beaujolais and the closest in style to Burgundy, because it's made in the same way as a pinot noir from a top vineyard site on the Côte d'Or, with a 20-30 day fermentation followed by partial ageing in French oak. These are wines that invariably get better with ageing. Château des Jacques is now considered among the leaders in Beaujolais and its ambition has had an effect on the rest of the region, encouraging many young growers by showing them what is possible.
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Beaujolais Vintage 2018

As with Bordeaux, we bought Beaujolais heavily in 2018 because the vintage is excellent. The wines have perfume and plenty of vibrant fruit whilst maintaining freshness, as acidity levels were good.

2018 vintage reviews

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