Jurançon Geyser, Domaine Cauhapé 2019 is no longer available

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Jurançon Geyser, Domaine Cauhapé 2019

White Wine from France - SW France (excl. Bordeaux)
Henri Ramonteu’s Béarnais blend of gros and petit manseng with camaralet, courbu and lauzet grapes is a bone-dry, full-bodied white with a zesty, grapefruit fragrance that works well with strong hard cheese or fish pie.
is no longer available
Code: FC39501

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • Bone dry
  • Petit Manseng
  • 14.5% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Now to 2025
  • 75cl
  • Cork, plastic

South-West France (ex Bordeaux)

Most of the wine regions representing the south-west of France are linked by river to Bordeaux and were once rivals of the Bordelais for trade. It was certainly not unknown for some of these wines to be brought to Bordeaux in order to stiffen the sinews of some of the thinner clarets in days gone by. However, there is more to the region than those appellations and the Vins de pays/ IGPs up-river of their erstwhile rival.

The south-west can be roughly compartmentalised in to four categories, as follows:

Bergeracois: running along both banks of the Dordogne River and including Bergerac, Monbazillac and other ACs where Bordeaux varieties proliferate, ably and interestingly supported by some local varieties.

Garonne: running along both banks of the River Garonne as far as Agen and featuring Côtes-de-Duras, Côtes-du-Marmandais, Buzet.

Haut-Pays: the area north and north-west of Toulouse including Gaillac, Cahors and the Côtes-du-Frontonnais.

Pyrenees: in the area between Adour and the Pyrenees. ...
Most of the wine regions representing the south-west of France are linked by river to Bordeaux and were once rivals of the Bordelais for trade. It was certainly not unknown for some of these wines to be brought to Bordeaux in order to stiffen the sinews of some of the thinner clarets in days gone by. However, there is more to the region than those appellations and the Vins de pays/ IGPs up-river of their erstwhile rival.

The south-west can be roughly compartmentalised in to four categories, as follows:

Bergeracois: running along both banks of the Dordogne River and including Bergerac, Monbazillac and other ACs where Bordeaux varieties proliferate, ably and interestingly supported by some local varieties.

Garonne: running along both banks of the River Garonne as far as Agen and featuring Côtes-de-Duras, Côtes-du-Marmandais, Buzet.

Haut-Pays: the area north and north-west of Toulouse including Gaillac, Cahors and the Côtes-du-Frontonnais.

Pyrenees: in the area between Adour and the Pyrenees. Here you will find Côtes de Gascogne, Madiran, Jurançon, Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh and Irouléguy, the latter of which is in real Basque country in the foothills of the Pyrennes, close to the Bay of Biscay.

The influence of the Atlantic Ocean is surprisingly strong even this deep inland and it merges with continental and alpine elements across such a large area to provide moist spring weather and wet winters counterbalanced by hot summers and long, sunny autumns just as the grapes are ripening. Naturally, the area is great enough in size for the soils to be incredibly varied across it. Alluvial and marine soils, often gravel and limestone respectively, are common factors in many areas, the former often on rising terraces above rivers or ancient watercourses.

In many appellations and IGPs it has taken the dynamism of forward thinking, passionate cooperatives and visionaries to save the vineyards and indigenous grape varieties of these regions from serious neglect or even extinction. The devastation of phylloxera around the end of the 19th century was particularly bad in these areas and it was not really until the 1970s, and even later in some cases, that a turnaround in fortunes occurred. The roll call of local varieites is impressive and promising – abouriou, arrufiac, baroque, duras, fer servadou, jurançon noir, len de l’el, petit manseng, gros manseng, mauzac, négrette, tannat and peiti courbu. It is a region that should make a curious wine lover’s mouth water.
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Domaine Cauhapé

The 40 hectare estate of Domaine Cauhapé is the leading light of the appellation of Jurançon in South West France. Jurançon lies in the foothills of the Pyrenees and although the area looks large on a map, the area under vine is in fact tiny, and this is one of the most sizeable domaines here. The grape varieties that dominate here are the two local manseng grapes: gros and petit.

Cauhapé’s owner is Henri Ramonteu. Henri came into the estate unexpectedly when his elder brother was killed in a road accident, but he soon proved to be a capable and forward-thinking vigneron. He was one of the first to create the dry style of Jurançon which now dominates production and from the start set out to make clean, aromatic and fruity wines. He also introduced new oak, which was unheard of...

Harvesting takes place here in stages throughout the Autumn and even through to January of the following year, and in some vintages as many as four sweet whites are made, depending on when the petit manseng grapes were picked and their degree of ripeness and sweetness. It is primarily these luscious, concentrated wines that make this domaine shine. Dry Jurançon is traditionally based on gros manseng, but more reccently Henri has pioneered a more complex interpretation, rich in petit manseng, and part-vinified in new oak.

Overall the quality here is remarkable. The wines possess an inherent poise and balance that set Domaine Cauhapé apart. Henri is active in ensuring that his wines are distributed...
The 40 hectare estate of Domaine Cauhapé is the leading light of the appellation of Jurançon in South West France. Jurançon lies in the foothills of the Pyrenees and although the area looks large on a map, the area under vine is in fact tiny, and this is one of the most sizeable domaines here. The grape varieties that dominate here are the two local manseng grapes: gros and petit.

Cauhapé’s owner is Henri Ramonteu. Henri came into the estate unexpectedly when his elder brother was killed in a road accident, but he soon proved to be a capable and forward-thinking vigneron. He was one of the first to create the dry style of Jurançon which now dominates production and from the start set out to make clean, aromatic and fruity wines. He also introduced new oak, which was unheard of...

Harvesting takes place here in stages throughout the Autumn and even through to January of the following year, and in some vintages as many as four sweet whites are made, depending on when the petit manseng grapes were picked and their degree of ripeness and sweetness. It is primarily these luscious, concentrated wines that make this domaine shine. Dry Jurançon is traditionally based on gros manseng, but more reccently Henri has pioneered a more complex interpretation, rich in petit manseng, and part-vinified in new oak.

Overall the quality here is remarkable. The wines possess an inherent poise and balance that set Domaine Cauhapé apart. Henri is active in ensuring that his wines are distributed in prestigious restaurants, and also works closely with other local vignerons to raise the wine profile of the South West.
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2019 vintage reviews

Shropshire Star

The nose is veryfresh, complex with aromas of exotic fruits, citrus flavours with floral,peppery and anise notes given by the camaralet and lauzet grapes. On the palateGeyser if full of flavour and...
The nose is veryfresh, complex with aromas of exotic fruits, citrus flavours with floral,peppery and anise notes given by the camaralet and lauzet grapes. On the palateGeyser if full of flavour and beautifully structured due to the petit mansenggrape. Fresh and well-balanced, the palate has fine flavours of white peaches,citrus with a streak of minerality and a long, spicy, complex finish. Drink asan aperitif, or with oysters, shellfish and seafood, asparagus, delicate fishdishes.
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- Sharon Walters

Portsmouth News

<div>Jurançon is a small region in south west France in the foothills of the Pyrenees and produces both dry and sweet wines from a number of grape varieties, which are seldom found...
<div>Jurançon is a small region in south west France in the foothills of the Pyrenees and produces both dry and sweet wines from a number of grape varieties, which are seldom found elsewhere.</div><div>This dry white wine is a blend of five different varieties including gross manseng, petit manseng and the very rare camaralet from one of the region’s best known producers.</div><div>It really is quite an exotic wine with aromas of grapefruit, peaches, herbs and honeysuckle.</div><div>The palate is beautifully textured with more exotic fruits and a touch of spice and a long, juicy finish.</div><div>This is a really delicious and different wine.</div><div>It makes a great aperitif, but would also work with some fresh seafood. - </div>
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Alistair Gibson

The Daily Telegraph

Jurançon is known forluscious sweet wines, but the dry (sec) wines are a bargain. This is all exoticspice, lime curd and peach. Ideal with food, but with enough precision to haveas an aperitif.

- Hamish Anderson

Manchester Evening News

I'm a big fan of thebreezy, vibrant wines from south west France and this one is one of theultimate expressions and at a very affordable price.Not a fashionable choice, but if you like Kiwi sauvignon...
I'm a big fan of thebreezy, vibrant wines from south west France and this one is one of theultimate expressions and at a very affordable price.Not a fashionable choice, but if you like Kiwi sauvignon blanc this may hit thesame spot. It's a blend of grapes most people will never have heard of: grosmanseng, petit manseng, camaralet, courbu and lauzet.While the nose carries a big grapefruit fragrance spiked with fennel seed, thepalate really packs a punch with peach and more spice cut with citrussyacidity.There's plenty of food matches here, but The Wine Society's suggestion of fishpie is perhaps the most appealing.
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- Andy Cronshaw

Rotherham and South Yorkshire Advertiser

Bone dry, weighty,fresh and aromatic, with notes of grapefruit and peach. On the palate, citrusnotes along with white fleshy stone fruit.

- David Clay

JancisRobinson.com

Look at all those local grape varieties! Glowing transparent copper colour. Really intense green-fruit nose and massive extract on the palate. Surprisingly accessible already. Odd that they are still ...
Look at all those local grape varieties! Glowing transparent copper colour. Really intense green-fruit nose and massive extract on the palate. Surprisingly accessible already. Odd that they are still using synthetic corks. Crunchy fruit and masses of character. Super-tangy and with real, admirable grip on the end. You could have a lot of fun trying different foods for this. Creamy pâté? Anything in a creamy sauce.
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16/20

decanter.com

The second wine of Domaine Cauhapé, this is made from grapes that will be unfamiliar to some wine lovers: Gros and Petit Manseng, Camaralet, Lauzet and Courbu. It's quite a rich,...
The second wine of Domaine Cauhapé, this is made from grapes that will be unfamiliar to some wine lovers: Gros and Petit Manseng, Camaralet, Lauzet and Courbu. It's quite a rich, full-bodied, unoaked style, with a marked fragrance of grapefruit, and a lingering zestiness on the finish. Almost exotic in character, this would happily withstand quite robust flavours, even some spice. Try it with strong hard cheese, or fresh river fish.
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90/100 Amy Wislocki

Yorkshire Post

This estate in the foothills of the Pyrenees is one of the most highly regarded in south-west France. Made from a handful of local grapes it has aromas honeysuckle, citrus and a dash of herbs with a...
This estate in the foothills of the Pyrenees is one of the most highly regarded in south-west France. Made from a handful of local grapes it has aromas honeysuckle, citrus and a dash of herbs with a rounded, yet racy palate.
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- Christine Austin

The Times

The Times 50 Top Whites: Sip something different with this gorgeous, zesty, clementine and pink grapefruit fragrant, full-bodied, bone-dry white from Jurançon, deep in southwest France. It’s...
The Times 50 Top Whites: Sip something different with this gorgeous, zesty, clementine and pink grapefruit fragrant, full-bodied, bone-dry white from Jurançon, deep in southwest France. It’s an unusual mix of petit and gros manseng, with a hotchpotch of other local grapes.
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- Jane MacQuitty

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