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The Society's Grüner Veltliner 2020

White Wine from Austria
The grü-v grape was a big success story at this this year's Wine Champions blind tastings, with Austria’s Stadt Krems securing a double victory. The first was the grüner they make for us, which showed just why we are so delighted to put our name to this wine: it really stood out with its succulent pear and nectarine flavours, refreshing spritz and gentle peppery twist.
Price: £8.25 Bottle
Price: £49.50 Case of 6
In Stock
Code: AA3211

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • Dry
  • Gruner Veltliner
  • 12% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Now to 2023
  • 75cl
  • Screwcap
Play Video
The Society's Grüner Veltliner 2020 in a nutshell by buyer for Austria, Freddy Bulmer.

Austria

Austria has a long history of making fine wines, but with the country’s wines undergoing a renaissance in recent years, now is arguably the best time to get to know the diverse and delicious bottles on offer.

There is evidence that vines were being cultivated in Austria for the production of wine by the Celts, even before the Romans. Austria was, rather surprisingly, the third-largest producer of wine globally in the 1920s, mainly producing and exporting simple light white wines. In more recent times the country has had to deal with the infamous ‘anti-freeze’ scandal of the 1980s when a handful of bulk producers were found to have adulterated their wines with ethylene glycol to sweeten their wines.

The problems of the 1980s hit the country’s industry hard, but also had the effect of initiating the most wide-ranging quality control measures being implemented to ensure that this sort of disaster could never happen again. The industry was further reinvigorated as larger and less...
Austria has a long history of making fine wines, but with the country’s wines undergoing a renaissance in recent years, now is arguably the best time to get to know the diverse and delicious bottles on offer.

There is evidence that vines were being cultivated in Austria for the production of wine by the Celts, even before the Romans. Austria was, rather surprisingly, the third-largest producer of wine globally in the 1920s, mainly producing and exporting simple light white wines. In more recent times the country has had to deal with the infamous ‘anti-freeze’ scandal of the 1980s when a handful of bulk producers were found to have adulterated their wines with ethylene glycol to sweeten their wines.

The problems of the 1980s hit the country’s industry hard, but also had the effect of initiating the most wide-ranging quality control measures being implemented to ensure that this sort of disaster could never happen again. The industry was further reinvigorated as larger and less quality-oriented producers went out of business, leaving old sites available for a new generation of winemakers and the original fine winefamily producers.

Austria's wine regions are confined to the east of the country where the Alps settle into the great Pannonian Plain, running north to south along the many borders from the Czech Republic in the north to Slovenia in the south. The climate here is continental, characterised by cold winters, hot dry summers, and often a large diurnal temperature flux with hot days, and cold nights. This is perfect for ripening a large range of grape varieties and retaining acidity and fresh aromas in white wines.

Broadly there are three major regions: Niederösterreich in the north, Burgenland and Steiermark to the south. Within these regions are a further 16 smaller DACs (Districtus Austriae Controllatus).

Niederösterreich (27,128ha) is known for high-quality white wine production, and most of the vineyards are focused along the banks of the Danube and its tributaries. Nearly half of all vines in this large area are grüner veltliner although world-class rieslings are also produced. Sub regions to look out for here include Kamptal, Kremstal, Wachau, Wagram and Weinviertel.

Burgenland (13,840ha) is the area of vineyards focused around Lake Neusiedl – Central Europe's second-largest lake which straddles the Austrian-Hungarian border. Full-bodied and rich red wines are produced under the influence of the hot continental climate. The complex soil structure throughout the hills surrounding the lake, the various aspects available and large diurnal temperature change allows fine mineral-driven reds to be made. The reds produced use local grape varieties which are suited to the terroir - look out for blaufränkisch, zweigelt and St Laurent. The natural humidity caused by the lake can also lead to high levels of botrytis making this an excellent source of high-quality dessert wines.

Steiermark (Styria) (4,240h) the smallest Austrian area is developing a great reputation for its steely sauvignons and fresh aromatic white wines. Although many of the best wines are made in such small quantities that they are never exported, this is a region to watch.

In terms of grapes, grüner veltliner, native to Austria and Central Europe, is the king of the whites in terms of volume. It is turned into everything from light, thirst-quenching wines to complex barrel-aged stars. It is a great food wine and is finding its way on to many more restaurant wine lists around the world.

Riesling is less widely planted, at only 5% of Austria’s production, but makes some of the country’s finest wines, particularly on the steep slopes of the Wachau Valley along the banks of the Danube. Riesling's common style in Austria is bone-dry, elegant and steely with fresh citrus flavours.

Chardonnay (sometimes locally called morillon) and sauvignon blanc are increasingly planted and are already showing themselves to be hugely promising. The highly aromatic scheurebe, a German import, has a foothold in Steiermark making peach and blackcurrant-leaf-scented wines that marry well with spicy foods.

Reds make up about a third of Austrian plantings. 13 varieties are permitted, including both the dominant indigenous varieties and those more recently introduced such as cabernet and pinot noir. Zweigelt is the most commonly planted, making up 15% of Austria’s red vines, and is a 1920s cross between blaufränkisch and St Laurent. It makes relatively light reds generally, with sour-cherry and redcurrant flavours supported by fine tannins and a spicy linear finish.

Blaufränkisch (pronounced blaou-FREN-kish) is a late-ripening indigenous variety can create wines with dense tannins, high acidity and concentration that can age well for many years. Generally the wines have notes of blackberries, ripe cherries or plums. St Laurent wines are often confused with pinot noir as they can have a similar profile: red-berry perfume, light elegant and crisp. However, St Laurent is often used to add elegance to a blend.
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Weingut Stadt Krems

Weingut Stadt Krems is a winery in the Kremstal region of Austria, owned and run by the local municipality. For years an old-fashioned, highly conservative organisation, it has been given a new lease of life by a more outward-looking and highly trained generation now firmly at the helm. Wine quality has improved dramatically as a result.

There are around 30 more winery-owned hectares of vineyards on terraced sites to the east and west of the city of Krems, planted predominantly to the varieties of grüner veltliner and riesling. No grapes have ever been bought in from outside vineyards for the wines produced here. The Society has recently been following one of the flagship wines, the Lössterrassen Grüner Veltliner, for its fresh, zesty qualities.

Austria Vintage 2020

The 2020 vintage in Austria will go down as a vintage which produced wines with a particularly impressive ageing potential. It was a long and cool vintage, resulting in wines with an incredible freshness, focus and structure.
2020 vintage reviews

Belfast Newsletter

... ripe, zesty and fulsome ... This award-winning Austrian white has pronounced pear, peach and nectarine flavours which mingle most pleasingly with subtle spices on a delightfully tangy palate in...
... ripe, zesty and fulsome ... This award-winning Austrian white has pronounced pear, peach and nectarine flavours which mingle most pleasingly with subtle spices on a delightfully tangy palate in this elegant, voluptuously perfumed drop which seems a natural match to mildly spiced Asian cuisine.
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- Raymond Gleug

Lynn News

This is an absolute joy. It starts out as a delicate pear and apple blossom tinted affair, but as the air gets to it so melon, peach stones and minerals get in on the act. And something clean and...
This is an absolute joy. It starts out as a delicate pear and apple blossom tinted affair, but as the air gets to it so melon, peach stones and minerals get in on the act. And something clean and simple becomes something complex and mysterious. Amazing value.
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- Giles Luckett

JancisRobinson.com

Just a little paint on the nose but excellent pure, satisfying fruit on the palate. A fair introduction to the grape variety?

15.5/20

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