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Trenel, Beaujolais-Villages 2018

Red Wine from France - Beaujolais
Ripe, full-flavoured wine principally from hillside vineyards near Vaux, with a refreshing, moreish palate. From south-east facing vineyards in the Terres Dorées region of southern Beaujolais.
is no longer available
Code: BJ8051

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Light to medium-bodied
  • Gamay
  • 12.5% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Drinking now
  • 75cl
  • Screwcap

Beaujolais

At its best, there is little that can match Beaujolais’ fragrant, sappy, fruity flavours. Beaujolais tends to be a delight to drink upon release; indeed, extolling the wines' youthful virtues has been hugely successful.

At one time more than half the crop of this region was hurriedly fermented and sold as Beaujolais Nouveau, released on the third Thursday of November and raced to market in as many inventive ways as possible. Its cheap price and fun image made it popular for a while but, inevitably, quality suffered and Nouveau fell out of fashion in the face of new world competition.

Away from Beaujolais Nouveau, another kind of Beaujolais continued to be made, often using very traditional methods of production and reflecting a complexity of terroir that still comes as something of a surprise.

Beaujolais lies between the towns of Mâcon and Lyon with most of the vineyard confusingly coming into the Département du Rhône. The vast majority of the region’s 18,500 hectares is planted...
At its best, there is little that can match Beaujolais’ fragrant, sappy, fruity flavours. Beaujolais tends to be a delight to drink upon release; indeed, extolling the wines' youthful virtues has been hugely successful.

At one time more than half the crop of this region was hurriedly fermented and sold as Beaujolais Nouveau, released on the third Thursday of November and raced to market in as many inventive ways as possible. Its cheap price and fun image made it popular for a while but, inevitably, quality suffered and Nouveau fell out of fashion in the face of new world competition.

Away from Beaujolais Nouveau, another kind of Beaujolais continued to be made, often using very traditional methods of production and reflecting a complexity of terroir that still comes as something of a surprise.

Beaujolais lies between the towns of Mâcon and Lyon with most of the vineyard confusingly coming into the Département du Rhône. The vast majority of the region’s 18,500 hectares is planted with a single red grape: gamay, or to be more precise, gamay noir à jus blanc. Often densely planted to help control the vines vigour, and therefore yields, trained low and pruned hard, they are need at least a short spell of real heat to ripen properly. In terms of soil, gamay does not do well on sedimentary rock types. Much of Beaujolais is granite with outcrops of schist in part of Morgon or Andesites in the Cote de Brouilly.

A little over 200 hectares is planted with chardonnay, which is growing in popularity because it is easier to sell and can be turned into sparkling Cremant de Bourgogne. White Beaujolais is sold either as Beaujolais blanc or Beaujolais-Villages blanc, and the best comes areas with chalk in the soil.

Below is a list of the appellations, but it is worth mentioning that the most important factor in the wines’ quality is the grower.

Beaujolais: Mostly from the south where the soils are often of a limestone called pierres dorées, which makes excellent building material. But there are granites as well and a great many styles of wine possible though a major part of the productions continues to be made as Nouveau.

Beaujolais-Villages: These wines come from the north and are set among the ten crus and planted on the same granitic soils. 38 parishes are allowed to produce Beaujolais-Villages. They offer a midway point between generic Beaujolais and the greater complexity of the crus.

The ten crus, from north to south, are: Saint-Amour, Juliénas, Chénas, Moulin-à-Vent, Fleurie, Chiroubles, Morgon, Regnié, Brouilly and Côte de Brouilly. Each have their own unique variation on the local geology and topography, climatic conditions and character; from the light, fragrant Chiroubles to the richer, more concentrated Moulin-à-Vent with its ability to age and comparison in great years with top Burgundies.

Within these crus are specific vineyards, or climats, with deserved reputations for high-quality, such as Poncié in Fleurie or Côte du Py in Morgon. For a more thorough examination of these crus and their characteristic traits please see our How to Buy Beaujolais guide in the Wine World & News section of our website.
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Trenel Fils SA

There are very few independent négociants left in Beaujolais, but the tireless work of the Trenel family means theirs is now one of the best, with long-established relationships with some the most emblematic growers in the region.

Claude-Henri Trenel founded the brand back in 1928, but it was his son André who really worked with passion and determination to establish their reputation, living by the motto ‘we only do well what we know well!’ Trenel still continues the family’s traditions, producing Beaujolais in all of the village crus, though even the vines for their Beaujolais-Villages are 10 to 60 years old.

Although Trenel is no longer family-owned (André’s nephew Bruno Chambe does still assist with estate management), its current owner, the Rhône producer Chapoutier, continues the family’s traditions. Trenel wines are still of a superbly high quality with a unique, smooth, fragrant style.

They are also very well known for their fruit liqueurs such as Crème de Cassis and Crème de Framboise, and these delicious fruit flavours are sometimes even apparent in the aromas of their wines.

Beaujolais Vintage 2018

As with Bordeaux, we bought Beaujolais heavily in 2018 because the vintage is excellent. The wines have perfume and plenty of vibrant fruit whilst maintaining freshness, as acidity levels were good.
2018 vintage reviews
2016 vintage reviews

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