Blind Spot Tasmanian Sauvignon Blanc 2019 is no longer available

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Blind Spot Tasmanian Sauvignon Blanc 2019

White Wine from Australia - Tasmania
3.714290000 star rating 7 Reviews
Serious and scintillating new Australian wine from Tasmania, this sauvignon blanc is a superb example of the variety. The Tasmanian acidity is keeping this wine fresh and vibrant. The nose is delicate and fresh, with green apple, lemon and peach notes and the palate is ripe, delicate and restrained, finishing with pear and gooseberry.
is no longer available
Code: AU23161

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • 2 - Dry
  • Sauvignon Blanc
  • 75cl
  • Drinking now
  • 13% Alcohol
  • no oak influence
  • Screwcap

Tasmania

A place of beautiful landscapes, this quaint island is separated from mainland Australia by the 240km stretch of the Bass Strait, and is a wine lover's and fisherman's dream. Boasting some of the world's finest seafood, its temperate climate makes it Australia's coolest wine producing region. As would be expected, sparkling wine, riesling and chardonnay thrive in Tasmania, but pinot noir can be exceptional, with a delicacy and lift often lacking in wines from the mainland.

The vineyards are in the main part clustered close to the two major urban areas, the state capital Hobart in the south and Launceston in the north, though there are no geographical demarcations within the island and no matter where the grapes come from the wine is labelled ‘Tasmania’.

The west coast of Tasmania is one of the wettest parts of Australia, but the area around Hobart is one of its driest and all the commercial vineyards sit in the east. The Coal River, Huon Valley and Derwent Valley areas embrace Hobart...
A place of beautiful landscapes, this quaint island is separated from mainland Australia by the 240km stretch of the Bass Strait, and is a wine lover's and fisherman's dream. Boasting some of the world's finest seafood, its temperate climate makes it Australia's coolest wine producing region. As would be expected, sparkling wine, riesling and chardonnay thrive in Tasmania, but pinot noir can be exceptional, with a delicacy and lift often lacking in wines from the mainland.

The vineyards are in the main part clustered close to the two major urban areas, the state capital Hobart in the south and Launceston in the north, though there are no geographical demarcations within the island and no matter where the grapes come from the wine is labelled ‘Tasmania’.

The west coast of Tasmania is one of the wettest parts of Australia, but the area around Hobart is one of its driest and all the commercial vineyards sit in the east. The Coal River, Huon Valley and Derwent Valley areas embrace Hobart and are warmer and drier than other vineyard zones, and the Coal River sometimes requires irrigation. Around Launceston in the north the Tamar and Piper’s River areas are cooler, though Tamar is warmer than Piper’s Brook to the extent that it is not considered ideal for pinot noir plantings. The bottom line is that it is not easy to pigeonhole the larger areas of Tasmania and one is required to zoom in to examine districts and even vineyards. The geography and climate is complex and there are bound to be even more improvement as growers, especially those new to the island, get to grips with the variety of terroirs and the wonderful possibilities they offer.
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Blind Spot

The Blind spot range of wines is made exclusively for us by renowned Australian winemaker, Mac Forbes. The way we work with Mac has evolved over time. For the last decade or so Mac had been seeking out parcels of wines from his extensive book of contacts and choosing those that showed delicious potential to bottle for us rather than seeing them disappear into the obscurity of big brand blends. They were far too good for that and the popularity of the range proved time and again that Mac’s judgements were spot on.

Now, the situation has evolved, and we have taken advantage of Mac’s unique position, knowledge on the ground, contacts books, and his undoubted and enviable talents to seek out great grapes for him to make wine from rather than sourcing wines that are already made. We fund the purchase of the grapes, often paying for them more than 12 months in advance of the wine being available, which is a first for The Wine Society and gives Mac the opportunity to be first in line to select fruit from vineyards he is excited about. The advantages are manifold. We get the winemaking of a talented, indeed renowned, winemaker; we have greater involvement in what gets made and how; there is better traceability of the fruit and how it is grown; and the wines can express their terroir when appropriate. It’s a win-win-win, and dare we say it, win, situation!

We have reduced the range size too, giving us greater and clearer focus, and allowing Mac to highlight the...

The Blind spot range of wines is made exclusively for us by renowned Australian winemaker, Mac Forbes. The way we work with Mac has evolved over time. For the last decade or so Mac had been seeking out parcels of wines from his extensive book of contacts and choosing those that showed delicious potential to bottle for us rather than seeing them disappear into the obscurity of big brand blends. They were far too good for that and the popularity of the range proved time and again that Mac’s judgements were spot on.

Now, the situation has evolved, and we have taken advantage of Mac’s unique position, knowledge on the ground, contacts books, and his undoubted and enviable talents to seek out great grapes for him to make wine from rather than sourcing wines that are already made. We fund the purchase of the grapes, often paying for them more than 12 months in advance of the wine being available, which is a first for The Wine Society and gives Mac the opportunity to be first in line to select fruit from vineyards he is excited about. The advantages are manifold. We get the winemaking of a talented, indeed renowned, winemaker; we have greater involvement in what gets made and how; there is better traceability of the fruit and how it is grown; and the wines can express their terroir when appropriate. It’s a win-win-win, and dare we say it, win, situation!

We have reduced the range size too, giving us greater and clearer focus, and allowing Mac to highlight the progressive and innovative approach of the best Australian winemaking as appropriate, while nodding to the heritage of the country and its history of creative blends and classic varieties.

You don’t have to be eagle-eyed to notice, too, that we are taking a fresh, and perhaps ‘funkier’ approach to our labelling of these wines, with the info and story upfront. It’s a striking departure and one that celebrates the future without losing sight of the past. This is a range we’re excited about, one that will offer some deliciously intriguing variety from Down Under.

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Australia Vintage 2019

It’s hard to give a blanket picture of how Australia has done in any particular vintage as, frankly, it’s huge! Regional variation notwithstanding, 2019 generally looks good in most regions after an excellent 2018. Drought, though, continued to be a problem, and rising temperatures in places such as McLaren Vale mean that alcohol levels are only going in one direction.

However, I would urge members not to base their view of the entirety of Australia on what is going on in Barossa or McLaren Vale. 2019 in Margaret River produced some excellent wines and this continues to be a world-class region for elegant, silky and delicious cabernet-based wines. Tasmania, Yarra and Mornington Peninsula have also shone in the 2019 vintage and demonstrate how fantastic Australia is for cooler-climate winemaking. Thanks to Margaret River and Mornington Peninsula’s sea influence (therefore keeping temperatures cooler) and the microclimates of Yarra Valley and Tasmania, these regions are set to become...
It’s hard to give a blanket picture of how Australia has done in any particular vintage as, frankly, it’s huge! Regional variation notwithstanding, 2019 generally looks good in most regions after an excellent 2018. Drought, though, continued to be a problem, and rising temperatures in places such as McLaren Vale mean that alcohol levels are only going in one direction.

However, I would urge members not to base their view of the entirety of Australia on what is going on in Barossa or McLaren Vale. 2019 in Margaret River produced some excellent wines and this continues to be a world-class region for elegant, silky and delicious cabernet-based wines. Tasmania, Yarra and Mornington Peninsula have also shone in the 2019 vintage and demonstrate how fantastic Australia is for cooler-climate winemaking. Thanks to Margaret River and Mornington Peninsula’s sea influence (therefore keeping temperatures cooler) and the microclimates of Yarra Valley and Tasmania, these regions are set to become increasingly important and worth following.
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2019 vintage reviews

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