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Marcillac ‘Lo Sang del Pais', Domaine du Cros 2019

Red Wine from France - SW France (excl. Bordeaux)
These steep, iron-rich slopes in south-west France have been good vineyard country for centuries. This is the key estate that has led the present revival. Ruby-coloured, quite full in this exceptional vintage, and rounded with flavours of raspberry and plum.
Price: £9.25 Bottle
Price: £111.00 Case of 12
In Stock
Code: FC40181

Wine characteristics

  • Red Wine
  • Light to medium-bodied
  • Fer
  • 13% Alcohol
  • No oak influence
  • Now to 2024
  • 75cl
  • Cork, natural

South-West France (ex Bordeaux)

Most of the wine regions representing the south-west of France are linked by river to Bordeaux and were once rivals of the Bordelais for trade. It was certainly not unknown for some of these wines to be brought to Bordeaux in order to stiffen the sinews of some of the thinner clarets in days gone by. However, there is more to the region than those appellations and the Vins de pays/ IGPs up-river of their erstwhile rival.

The south-west can be roughly compartmentalised in to four categories, as follows:

Bergeracois: running along both banks of the Dordogne River and including Bergerac, Monbazillac and other ACs where Bordeaux varieties proliferate, ably and interestingly supported by some local varieties.

Garonne: running along both banks of the River Garonne as far as Agen and featuring Côtes-de-Duras, Côtes-du-Marmandais, Buzet.

Haut-Pays: the area north and north-west of Toulouse including Gaillac, Cahors and the Côtes-du-Frontonnais.

Pyrenees: in the area between Adour and the Pyrenees. ...
Most of the wine regions representing the south-west of France are linked by river to Bordeaux and were once rivals of the Bordelais for trade. It was certainly not unknown for some of these wines to be brought to Bordeaux in order to stiffen the sinews of some of the thinner clarets in days gone by. However, there is more to the region than those appellations and the Vins de pays/ IGPs up-river of their erstwhile rival.

The south-west can be roughly compartmentalised in to four categories, as follows:

Bergeracois: running along both banks of the Dordogne River and including Bergerac, Monbazillac and other ACs where Bordeaux varieties proliferate, ably and interestingly supported by some local varieties.

Garonne: running along both banks of the River Garonne as far as Agen and featuring Côtes-de-Duras, Côtes-du-Marmandais, Buzet.

Haut-Pays: the area north and north-west of Toulouse including Gaillac, Cahors and the Côtes-du-Frontonnais.

Pyrenees: in the area between Adour and the Pyrenees. Here you will find Côtes de Gascogne, Madiran, Jurançon, Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh and Irouléguy, the latter of which is in real Basque country in the foothills of the Pyrennes, close to the Bay of Biscay.

The influence of the Atlantic Ocean is surprisingly strong even this deep inland and it merges with continental and alpine elements across such a large area to provide moist spring weather and wet winters counterbalanced by hot summers and long, sunny autumns just as the grapes are ripening. Naturally, the area is great enough in size for the soils to be incredibly varied across it. Alluvial and marine soils, often gravel and limestone respectively, are common factors in many areas, the former often on rising terraces above rivers or ancient watercourses.

In many appellations and IGPs it has taken the dynamism of forward thinking, passionate cooperatives and visionaries to save the vineyards and indigenous grape varieties of these regions from serious neglect or even extinction. The devastation of phylloxera around the end of the 19th century was particularly bad in these areas and it was not really until the 1970s, and even later in some cases, that a turnaround in fortunes occurred. The roll call of local varieites is impressive and promising – abouriou, arrufiac, baroque, duras, fer servadou, jurançon noir, len de l’el, petit manseng, gros manseng, mauzac, négrette, tannat and peiti courbu. It is a region that should make a curious wine lover’s mouth water.
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Domaine du Cros

The story of so many wines of south-west France is intricately tied up with the history of Santiago de Compostela and this is the case with Marcillac. The origins are older of course; the Romans understood the potential of the Douro-like terraces that form the landscape here. But the town of Conques, occupying a pivotal position along the pilgrim’s route saw a blossoming in the vineyards of nearby Marcillac. And then in the XIXth century the steel town of Decazeville saw a staggering expansion of the vineyards there.

But then, fortunes changed. First phylloxera then war saw Marcillac all but destroyed. The Teulier family was one of few to own what was left of this once large vineyard.

And so under the drive and guidance of Philippe Teulier, and others, the fightback began.

It was a slow business to start as Marcillac is not easy to plant with vineyards. The terrain is challenging and at high altitude, as is the climate which is continental. Philippe is today one of the largest land holders, now working with his son, Julien. They make red and white but of course the majority is red. Only one red grape variety is planted and this is locally known as mansois, known in Madiran and Cahors as fer servadou, appropriately enough as the soils here are naturally rich in iron.

Marcillac is a mountain wine, closer in style in some ways to many reds produced in Savoie. The wines tend to be light, bursting with raspberry-like fruit and there is always a tannic presence which gives a...
The story of so many wines of south-west France is intricately tied up with the history of Santiago de Compostela and this is the case with Marcillac. The origins are older of course; the Romans understood the potential of the Douro-like terraces that form the landscape here. But the town of Conques, occupying a pivotal position along the pilgrim’s route saw a blossoming in the vineyards of nearby Marcillac. And then in the XIXth century the steel town of Decazeville saw a staggering expansion of the vineyards there.

But then, fortunes changed. First phylloxera then war saw Marcillac all but destroyed. The Teulier family was one of few to own what was left of this once large vineyard.

And so under the drive and guidance of Philippe Teulier, and others, the fightback began.

It was a slow business to start as Marcillac is not easy to plant with vineyards. The terrain is challenging and at high altitude, as is the climate which is continental. Philippe is today one of the largest land holders, now working with his son, Julien. They make red and white but of course the majority is red. Only one red grape variety is planted and this is locally known as mansois, known in Madiran and Cahors as fer servadou, appropriately enough as the soils here are naturally rich in iron.

Marcillac is a mountain wine, closer in style in some ways to many reds produced in Savoie. The wines tend to be light, bursting with raspberry-like fruit and there is always a tannic presence which gives a rustic feel to the wine.

Unquestionably, Marcillac is a great food wine and one of the partners to such staple fare as bangers and mash. Philippe and Julien Teulier farm some 30 hectares of Marcillac, or nearly 20% of the total. The main wine, colourfully called ‘Lo Sang del Pais’ sees no oak and is bottled after the winter. They also make a more ambitious cuvee of old vines which is aged oak and which we occasionally buy.
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2019 vintage reviews
2018 vintage reviews
2016 vintage reviews

Sunday Telegraph

Best spring wines for £10 and under: A holiday red for me – and I love to drink it at home, too. From Aveyron in south-west France, it’s made from the fer servadou grape and has a...
Best spring wines for £10 and under: A holiday red for me – and I love to drink it at home, too. From Aveyron in south-west France, it’s made from the fer servadou grape and has a bloody tang. Good for bavette-frites or tuna steak.
Read more

- Victoria Moore

wineanorak.com

This is such a characterful wine, and it’s one I’ve been buying for years. It’s still delivering, as this latest release shows. This is a varietal fer servadou from the...
This is such a characterful wine, and it’s one I’ve been buying for years. It’s still delivering, as this latest release shows. This is a varietal fer servadou from the southwest of France. Fresh, juicy and vivid with lovely floral black cherry fruit, some sappy green notes and a bit of raspberry. The palate is juicy and fruity but also has some pepper, and also some meat, spice and iodine notes, as well as some iodine and blood notes adding savoury interest. It’s supple, fresh, juicy and amazingly drinkable. There’s a lovely fruitiness here, but also some seriousness.
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91/100  Jamie Goode

Sunday Telegraph

30 of the best wines to drink this summer: A distinctive, lightest red made in south-west France from the fer servadou grape, this is a red with the bloody tang of iron and it’s superb with...
30 of the best wines to drink this summer: A distinctive, lightest red made in south-west France from the fer servadou grape, this is a red with the bloody tang of iron and it’s superb with lamb kebabs, steak-frites, green salad with a very mustardy dressing or cheesy pasta.
Read more

- Victoria Moore

Sunday Telegraph

30 of the best wines to drink this summer: A distinctive, lightish red made in south-west France from the fer servadou grape, this is a red with the bloody tang of iron and it’s superb with lamb...
30 of the best wines to drink this summer: A distinctive, lightish red made in south-west France from the fer servadou grape, this is a red with the bloody tang of iron and it’s superb with lamb kebabs, steak-frites, green salad with a very mustardy dressing or cheesy pasta.
Read more

- Victoria Moore

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