This is a carousel with zoom. Use the thumbnails to navigate, or jump to a slide. Use the zoom button to zoom into a image.

The Society's Exhibition Saint-Aubin Blanc 2018

White Wine from France - Burgundy
The cool and narrow Saint-Aubin valley has benefitted from global warming. It used to struggle to ripeness. Now it is ripe yet fresh. Matured in oak for about a year, this lovely white Burgundy is made from Le Ban vineyard fruit.
Price: £18.50 Bottle
Price: £222.00 Case of 12
In Stock
Code: BU74421

Wine characteristics

  • White Wine
  • Dry
  • Chardonnay
  • 13% Alcohol
  • Oak used but not v. noticeable
  • Now to 2022
  • 75cl
  • Cork, diam

Côte de Beaune

The Côte de Beaune runs from Ladoix-Serrigny in the north to Cheilly lè Maranges in the south, on the southern escarpment of the Côte d’Or. Beaune is the town at its heart. The most famous wines of the area are white, but many excellent reds are produced.

The soils of the area are predominantly mixtures of clay and limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The hillsides here, split and riven by streams and side-valleys, provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as various aspects ranging from east-facing to south and south-west facing. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle. Soils with more limestone suit chardonnay more than pinot, hence the number of famous white burgundies produced...
The Côte de Beaune runs from Ladoix-Serrigny in the north to Cheilly lè Maranges in the south, on the southern escarpment of the Côte d’Or. Beaune is the town at its heart. The most famous wines of the area are white, but many excellent reds are produced.

The soils of the area are predominantly mixtures of clay and limestone of various types, which is excellent for drainage but also retention of water. The hillsides here, split and riven by streams and side-valleys, provide a number of meso- and microclimates as well as various aspects ranging from east-facing to south and south-west facing. The best sites are neither at the top or the bottom of these slopes where the soils are too impoverished or too fertile respectively. More generic wines are produced at the top and bottom of these slopes, with the Premiers Crus and Grand Crus in a band running along the upper middle. Soils with more limestone suit chardonnay more than pinot, hence the number of famous white burgundies produced here.

The climate here is semi-continental, though northerly winds can temper a hot summer while warmer winds from the south can bring warmth. Westerly winds that ultimately originate in the Atlantic can bring rain but at its worst may deliver devastating hail in incredibly localised storms. There is a degree of unpredictability about vintages in Burgundy.

Pinot noir and chardonnay are the two permitted grapes of any significance, though Aligoté is grown occasionally for crisp, mouth-watering whites that are often used to make kir, and some generic Bourgogne or Crémant can be made with pinot blanc, pinot gris and beurrot can be made.

The appellations to be found in the Côte de Beaune are as follows: Ladoix, Pernand-Vergelesses, Aloxe-Corton , Corton, Corton-Charlemagne, Chorey-lès-Beaune, Savigny-lès Beaune, Beaune, Pommard, Volnay, Monthélie, Auxey-Duresses, Saint-Romain, Meursault, Saint-Aubin, Puligny-Montrachet, Chassagne-Montrachet, Santenay and Maranges

Côte de Beaune-Villages and Bourgogne-Hautes Côtes de Beaune are also made. The former is solely for red wines and the latter includes some whites as well. Both are mostly from vineyards on the top of the escarpment and some represent good value for early drinking Burgundy.

Côte de Beaune wines are generally lighter than those from the Côte de Nuits. Beaunes are soft and round, Volnays fine and silky. Pommards are the exception: due to more clay in the soil, they can be notably tannic and in need of considerable bottle age. The greatest of all white Burgundies, Le Montrachet, is made here between Chassagne and Puligny.
Read more

Domaine Henri Prudhon

The Prudhons have deep wine roots in the tiny community of Saint-Aubin, a well-situated village behind Le Montrachet and becoming increasingly recognised for the quality of its wines. Their 14 hectare estate, named after the current generation’s grandfather, Henri and planted with 60% pinot noir and 40% chardonnay, is one of the best of the commune. It is an extremely reliable source of both reds and whites, and unlike many Saint-Aubin domaines, the Prudhons have no plans to convert more to white - they enjoy making the reds so much. Both The Society’s Exhibition red and white Saint-Aubin come from the Prudhon stable. The white is a pretty chardonnay, part-fermented and matured in lightly toasted barrels which infuse it with just the right amount of oak. Like its white counterpart the red from the village of Gamay, but made from pinot noir, displays the charm and drinkability characteristic of the commune. Of the red premiers crus, Le Sentier du Clou has the most depth and tannin. Of the 8 white premiers crus Murgers des Dents de Chien, Chatenière and Remilly are particularly fine which is not surprising given their proximity to Puligny-Montrachet. In Puligny itself is Les Enseignères which is one of the best vineyards for village Puligny sited just below Bâtard-Montrachet. At the very top of the slope, premier cru La Garenne produces taut and mineral wines which relax after a few years in bottle.
2018 vintage reviews
2017 vintage reviews
2016 vintage reviews

Recommended for you

Back to top